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    Post #1 - August 2nd, 2006, 9:02 pm
    Post #1 - August 2nd, 2006, 9:02 pm Post #1 - August 2nd, 2006, 9:02 pm
    I am interested in a trip to the Casino in Hammond. I think it is the Horseshoe. Has anyone eaten there? What restaurant do you recommend?
  • Post #2 - August 2nd, 2006, 10:24 pm
    Post #2 - August 2nd, 2006, 10:24 pm Post #2 - August 2nd, 2006, 10:24 pm
    For dining, I recommend leaving the casino, heading down Indianapolis Blvd to Calumet Ave, and going to Phil Smidt's (turn left on Calumet) or Keith's (turn right on Calumet). Or stay on Indianapolis Blvd, and just past Calumet on the left is Arnie's, the most famous hot dog stand in Northwest Indiana. (Note I said most famous, the best is Madvek's, about a half-mile north of 80/94 on Calumet Ave.)
    Last edited by Guest on August 4th, 2006, 8:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #3 - August 3rd, 2006, 5:47 am
    Post #3 - August 3rd, 2006, 5:47 am Post #3 - August 3rd, 2006, 5:47 am
    I second the suggestion for Phil Smidts! All you can eat frog legs or lake perch. Great classic place. I think they still bring out a relish tray!
    http://www.froglegs.com/
  • Post #4 - August 3rd, 2006, 11:27 am
    Post #4 - August 3rd, 2006, 11:27 am Post #4 - August 3rd, 2006, 11:27 am
    I agree on Phil Smidt's as well. I went there for Easter and it was very good. I hadn't been there since I was a kid. The meal starts with dishes of pickled beets, coleslaw, cottage cheese, and three bean salad served family style. They are famous for their fried perch and it was excellent. I ordered the smaller portion and it was quite large. It's a very "old school" place--don't be put off when you enter the lobby area. I recommend sitting in the rose room instead of the mirror room--the atmosphere is nicer in my opinion. They have gooseberry pie on the dessert menu--I'd never seen it before anywhere and tried it warm with ice cream. It was really good!
  • Post #5 - August 4th, 2006, 8:21 am
    Post #5 - August 4th, 2006, 8:21 am Post #5 - August 4th, 2006, 8:21 am
    Just watch out for the sniper! He shot another car window out yesterday down that way...
  • Post #6 - August 4th, 2006, 8:44 am
    Post #6 - August 4th, 2006, 8:44 am Post #6 - August 4th, 2006, 8:44 am
    The "sniper" incidents (most appear to be someone throwing rocks at cars) are several miles from the area we're talking about, which is within walking distance of the Chicago city limits.

    Hmm...why is this thread here and not in the Chicagoland forum?
  • Post #7 - August 4th, 2006, 9:44 am
    Post #7 - August 4th, 2006, 9:44 am Post #7 - August 4th, 2006, 9:44 am
    Well, if by "several miles' away you mean 4 or 5, then yes I guess you're right....

    .but as the map in today's Sun Times shows, incidents have been reported over quite a large distance in nothern Indiana....so apparently snipers have access to cars for transportation as well

    First I've heard of the "Rock Throwing" theory..especially when witnesses/victims have heard shots/seen a guy in a trenchcoat with a rifle..

    www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-sniper04.html
  • Post #8 - August 4th, 2006, 12:57 pm
    Post #8 - August 4th, 2006, 12:57 pm Post #8 - August 4th, 2006, 12:57 pm
    Those who saw a guy in a trenchcoat with a rifle also said he was on a grassy knoll...why do I have an urge to view the Zapruder film?
  • Post #9 - August 4th, 2006, 1:04 pm
    Post #9 - August 4th, 2006, 1:04 pm Post #9 - August 4th, 2006, 1:04 pm
    As I drove through that area last Friday, I saw an abundance of police cars, supposedly looking for the sniper. I also spotted a guy in Camo with binoculars hiding in the weeds who was just "looking around".
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #10 - August 4th, 2006, 1:42 pm
    Post #10 - August 4th, 2006, 1:42 pm Post #10 - August 4th, 2006, 1:42 pm
    All this aside and back to food....If anything might be worth the risk of getting shot for, it's Phil Shmidt's perch in butter....mmmmmmm

    Well, almost...
  • Post #11 - February 5th, 2007, 9:26 pm
    Post #11 - February 5th, 2007, 9:26 pm Post #11 - February 5th, 2007, 9:26 pm
    Turning this post back around to the original focus, I thought I would add some data points about dining at the Hammond Horseshoe casino itself. No, they do not have frog legs or smelts, but they do have a rather nicely appointed steakhouse, Jack Binion's -- a place with a multitude of faults and charms.

    For those who don't like to read to the end, I'll state up front that Binion's is not a destination restaurant; in fact, it is barely competent by Chicago steakhouse standards, with the exception of the steaks themselves, which honestly are fantastic. It's on everything else that they fall down.

    OK, not everything. First of all, the bar has rapidly become one of my favorite hangs in the Chicagoland area. Gambler's widowers, lushes, cigar-chompers, extended family ... it's all on a first name basis here. Yet elegant, and with two grandmother mixologists keeping it real. Plus $5.00 for a Maker's Mark Manhattan and a water back ... one drink alone pays the Skyway toll.

    Second, the restaurant itself is very well appointed, if you can ignore the splashy, 6-foot tall portrait of the rather unaesthetic mug of Mr. Binion on the restaurant wall. But, presuming you get your chair faced out over the lake, the rest of the room is very pleasant, in a clubby sort of way.

    OK, now for the flaws. They are significant; be forewarned. First flaw, the sides, the desserts ... basically anything other than the protein course ... will be mediocre or worse. And oriented toward quantity over quality. Case in point, this Saturday night, I had a rather delicious piece of broiled salmon, perfectly moist inside and crisp outside, but the "wild rice" side dish consisted of a half washtub of brown rice with a small handful of actual wild rice tossed in for color. I expected (perhaps foolishly) a small pile of actual wild rice, and nothing but wild rice, on my plate; but Binion's panders to the hungry, uneducated palate. And so, a bunch of competently cooked brown rice that would provide enough starch for a triathlon attempt. Ah, well.

    Second complaint, the "educational" service. OK, given the setting I guess they may get a few unsophisticated diners, but they provide play-by-play commentary on every aspect of the restaurant dining experience in a way that borders on patronizing ("You will be served by Phillipe, who will take your food orders and bring you your food.") A minor annoyance, but still.

    Third, they have a very decent wine list, but nobody there really understands or has anything to do with the selections. Somebody at Harrah's corporate set them up with a wine list that (deservedly) has won a Wine Spectator award or two. In particular, for many of the higher end wines, they offer multiple vintages, at varying price points that reflect, more or less, the quality of those vintages (e.g., they have five or six different years of Opus One, with a $50 plus range in prices). That's pretty cool, but then they make mistakes like putting a Viader Cab in the Pinot Noir section, such that I foolishly drop $160 on what I thought must be a new experiment in Pinot by Viader ... but is really just a typo (not that the wine wasn't great, but they didn't realize they were serving me a Cab, until I tried it and told them as much.) Considering that 2001 bottle retails for $100, I suppose I should just shut up about it.

    Fourth, don't even think about the appetizers and desserts. $12 gets you a shrimp cocktail including five mealy, rubbery shrimp and flavorless cocktail sauce; $7.00 or so gets you a "creme brulee" consisting of vanilla Jello pudding covered in burnt sugar. It helps when you are getting comped on this stuff (which we were), but still. Not exciting and not the highlight of the evening (that was Mrs. JiLS's $500 pull on a nickel slot).

    So, anyway, go for the $5.00 call Manhattans and the very good to excellent entrees, as well as the convenience to the very excellent Horseshoe casino (it really is a nice establishment), but don't have any high hopes for a great dining experience.
    JiLS
  • Post #12 - February 6th, 2007, 2:17 pm
    Post #12 - February 6th, 2007, 2:17 pm Post #12 - February 6th, 2007, 2:17 pm
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:Turning this post back around to the original focus,


    ...since you tried the steakhouse there let me comment on the Horseshoe buffet. For a few months, I was continuously gettting coupons from the Horseshoe, among which included a monthly coupon for a free buffet for 2. And who can turn down a free buffet (+ they always had another coupon for $25 cash at the same time...). The coupons were a bit of a mystery since I never spent any significant cash at their casino and it was well over a year past since I had last visited when I started getting the coupons. Anyway, I went a few times.

    ...The buffet is "OK" ... Nothing is really great or not part of standard buffet fare.. There aren't even the dainty crab legs often served in Vegas buffets. There is a meat carving station, where you can get prime rib, roast beef, different sausauges, and that's about as exciting as it gets. I always try to request the meat something other than well done, a request which seems to go right over their heads. Desserts all look good but fall somewhere short of being anything more than average buffet food. They have one of those chocolate fountain things, which I generally am repulsed by the thought of chocolate recirculating through the air all day, yet somehow I always end up dipping something in it.

    they have a rather large "ethnic" Chinese section, which seems to do nothing but churn out won tons and mediocre crab rangoon... (I think many of their workers come from Chinatown on their Chinatown shuttle maybe?)

    Buffet cleanliness is always very important (which I realize has a lot do with the clientele), this one was somewhere around average on that mark as well.

    The bottom line... if it were free I'd go back. If I was paying, I'd say it's worth about $10.

    Their asking price is about $25 I think, which I think you'd have to be a nutjob to pay.
  • Post #13 - February 7th, 2007, 6:17 am
    Post #13 - February 7th, 2007, 6:17 am Post #13 - February 7th, 2007, 6:17 am
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:Turning this post back around to the original focus, I thought I would add some data points about dining at the Hammond Horseshoe casino itself. No, they do not have frog legs or smelts, but they do have a rather nicely appointed steakhouse, Jack Binion's -- a place with a multitude of faults and charms.


    JiLS, this is a very enlightening post. I've been writing business-to-business marketing videos for Horseshoe for several years, always highlighting the buffet and Jack Binion's Steakhouse, and though I have been to Hammond a few times, I've never eaten at any of the restaurants. Glad to hear the steaks are good.

    You mention Jack's mug in the painting -- as you might have guessed: Jack Binion iconongraphy is still perceived as a huge draw. Even after Harrah's bought many of the locations, they keep Binion's face and name on the places because of his dad's Vegas legacy and his philosophy of being all about the gambler.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #14 - February 7th, 2007, 8:32 pm
    Post #14 - February 7th, 2007, 8:32 pm Post #14 - February 7th, 2007, 8:32 pm
    David Hammond wrote:You mention Jack's mug in the painting -- as you might have guessed: Jack Binion iconongraphy is still perceived as a huge draw.


    Well, imagine this mug painted by this artist. Now imagine it being 6 feet tall and staring at you while you eat dinner. (That said, I won $120 in 10 seconds playing a "Binionaire" $1 slot with Jack's mug replacing the jackpot symbols on the wheels, so I suppose I should shut the f___ up.)
    JiLS
  • Post #15 - February 8th, 2007, 9:44 pm
    Post #15 - February 8th, 2007, 9:44 pm Post #15 - February 8th, 2007, 9:44 pm
    dddane wrote:...The buffet is "OK" ... Nothing is really great or not part of standard buffet fare.. There aren't even the dainty crab legs often served in Vegas buffets.
    Weekend nights they have crab legs in the buffet. I observed this gazing down from the balcony above, didn't actually try them. But "dainty" is not the adjective I would select for the orgy of crabophagy I witnessed in the buffet two weeks ago.
    JiLS
  • Post #16 - February 21st, 2007, 9:13 pm
    Post #16 - February 21st, 2007, 9:13 pm Post #16 - February 21st, 2007, 9:13 pm
    The other post's gave good advice, especially steering you towards Phil Schmidt's and Keiths but also try El Taco Real a few miles south off of Calumet Ave.
    The big news is that the casino is being replaced by one that is over 3x the current size. It will have a 2900 seat theatre and bars from Las Vegas, I think Shadow bar. The food is going to change and be upgraded so spring of 08 should be interesting.
  • Post #17 - March 10th, 2007, 7:37 pm
    Post #17 - March 10th, 2007, 7:37 pm Post #17 - March 10th, 2007, 7:37 pm
    BigDar wrote:I am interested in a trip to the Casino in Hammond. I think it is the Horseshoe. Has anyone eaten there? What restaurant do you recommend?

    Also wanted to mention that Jack Binion's Steak House received the Award for Excellence from Wine Spectator magazine.
  • Post #18 - April 17th, 2008, 2:16 pm
    Post #18 - April 17th, 2008, 2:16 pm Post #18 - April 17th, 2008, 2:16 pm
    Since last fall, Binion's has improved quite a bit in some of the areas I complained about previously, to wit:

    I wrote:Second complaint, the "educational" service. OK, given the setting I guess they may get a few unsophisticated diners, but they provide play-by-play commentary on every aspect of the restaurant dining experience in a way that borders on patronizing ("You will be served by Phillipe, who will take your food orders and bring you your food.") A minor annoyance, but still.


    The servers are now more professional and less talky. For example, I've dined there multiple times since November '06, without once being told what the waiter's function is. That's progress.

    I wrote:Third, they have a very decent wine list, but nobody there really understands or has anything to do with the selections.


    The waitstaff on my past two or three visits has been much better informed on the wine list, and I've not seen any typos, etc. since the one I reported previously.

    I wrote:Fourth, don't even think about the appetizers ... $12 gets you a shrimp cocktail including five mealy, rubbery shrimp and flavorless cocktail sauce


    Here, at least, is an almost complete reversal. The shrimp are now among the best I've had anywhere in this region; huge, firm, flavorful and worth the price. In fact, worth the price of the $25 larger serving. And I've learned the secret to the cocktail sauce is to request extra horseradish and mix to your own heat preference. I highly recommend Binion's shrimp cocktail.

    Of course, all of this is even tastier if you are being comped, but the prices are not out of line for a Chicago steak house, the steaks are excellent, and the drinks at the bar are notably cheaper than most.

    In my original post 17 months ago, I characterized Binion's as "barely competent" as a Chicago steak house. That no longer holds, as they have improved markedly as a restaurant (they were always good for steaks, and they had the raw materials in the form of a great space, a captive audience, great ingredients and a really fine wine cellar, but they didn't know what to do with them). Given the changes they've made since then, I'd say they are squarely in the middle of the pack, maybe as good as Stetson's (where Mrs. JiLS and I ate last night, so I have a recent reference for that one).
    JiLS
  • Post #19 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:18 pm
    Post #19 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:18 pm Post #19 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:18 pm
    Things just keep improving -- in most important ways -- at Binion's Steakhouse. Now that the casino has morphed into a Brobdingnagian entertainment megaplex, the steakhouse has not been immune to some upgrades, too. First, they redecorated the place and took down the goddawful Jack Binion painting. The bad news is they also took down the TVs over the bar, which used to be a prime hangout spot, but the good news is that as a result, I spent a good 90 minutes chatting with a retired Chicago cop about the far southeastside neighborhood abutting Hammond, and why the 4th Amendment should be repealed (or at least not enforced so rabidly). So that's actually a plus. But the best improvements were experienced on the dining room floor. First, they've brought in a bunch of new talent, including our server, who just came from several years waiting tables in Las Vegas -- and it showed. A real professional waiter, working in Hammond, Indiana. Refreshing.

    As the restaurant manager, Chuck, confirmed to me in conversation later that evening, they've taken measures to make the steakhouse fully competitive with downtown rivals. I'd say they are succeeding, and that their primary target is probably, surprisingly enough, David Burke's Primehouse. They've added a raft of dry-aged, Wagyu and Kobe steaks to the menu and, while not extending beyond a 35-day age, the dry-aged KC strip I ate there Friday night was stunningly flavorful, flowing with juice and gooey, aged fat, and with just enough "tear" in the muscle to satisfy the inner Cromagnon. Mrs. JiLS' Wagyu filet mignon was just the sort of beef-flavored buttercream you'd expect; if you like filet mignon, this is the one you need to try (6 oz is plenty enough). We ate at Keefer's a couple of nights earlier, and while we remain jazzed about their space, their service and their creative "themed" use of ingredients on the specials (on this visit, the Iron Chef Secret Ingredient at Keefer's was oxtail, used in an appetizer and at least one entree), the quality of the meat at Binion's exceeds that at Keefer's and, as hinted above, is a rival for Burke's. Plus, you can gamble there.

    They've also revamped the appetizer list. We very much enjoyed a smoked salmon plate, not strongly flavored at all, but the firmest, cleanest-cut salmon I've had in a while. They've also added trendy items like a pork belly appetizer, for example. The bad news is that they have eliminated the shrimp cocktail, which as I've opined earlier is the best, head and shoulders (if shrimp had shoulders) above all competition I've had, anywhere. I asked Chuck to consider putting it back on, and he listened seriously to me. (He also took notes when I encouraged him to check out LTH; hi, Chuck!)
    Last edited by JimInLoganSquare on August 3rd, 2008, 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    JiLS
  • Post #20 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:31 pm
    Post #20 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:31 pm Post #20 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:31 pm
    Jim,

    How was this restaurant priced? I have always had the impression that a fine restaurant in that environment may be a loss leader to attract their target clientelle of gamblers.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #21 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:45 pm
    Post #21 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:45 pm Post #21 - August 3rd, 2008, 9:45 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Jim,

    How was this restaurant priced? I have always had the impression that a fine restaurant in that environment may be a loss leader to attract their target clientelle of gamblers.

    Regards,


    Sorry, not a loss leader, other than the cocktails ($5 gets you a large, well-mixed Maker's Mark Manhattan). My dry-aged steak was about $50, appetizers were $12 to $15, all other prices commensurate with a downtown steakhouse. That said, you can apply points from your Harrah's player's card to your meal, so if you've already done some gambling, you'll get "comped" a bit on the meal.
    JiLS
  • Post #22 - August 7th, 2008, 1:56 pm
    Post #22 - August 7th, 2008, 1:56 pm Post #22 - August 7th, 2008, 1:56 pm
    I was at the Horseshoe last night with some friends for a lengthy evening of Pai Gow. They have done an unbelievable job with the renovation. It's about a billion times nicer than it was the last time I was there about 5 years ago.

    We didn't eat in the steakhouse, but since we were playing Pai Gow we were given comps to the noodle bar located in the back of the room where Pai Gow is located. It's a pretty basic menu with different noodle soups, congee, and dim sum. I had a bowl of noodle soup (looked to be ramen noodles, but they were called "egg noodles" on the menu) with roasted duck. I have to say, it was actually pretty tasty especially given the low low price of $0. They also put out a dish of lychees on the table when you sit down.

    We were also able to grab a snack in the VIP lounge. They were carving turkey for sandwiches. Again, the turkey was pretty tasty. It was nice and moist, with a nice bit of spice used for the rub on the skin (I was able to convince the carver to give me a big old hunk of skin, which was almost as sweet as the $300 I won last night).

    All in all, a very solid operation. The staff was all very friendly, in an "adhering to corporate guidelines" kind of way (all interactions started with staff members introducing themselves, which is actually a nice touch when you compare it to the general surliness of employees at other local casinos). The half hour trip from downtown makes this place way too close, especially given all of the improvements.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #23 - August 8th, 2008, 5:26 pm
    Post #23 - August 8th, 2008, 5:26 pm Post #23 - August 8th, 2008, 5:26 pm
    jesteinf wrote: We didn't eat in the steakhouse, but since we were playing Pai Gow we were given comps to the noodle bar located in the back of the room where Pai Gow is located. It's a pretty basic menu with different noodle soups, congee, and dim sum. I had a bowl of noodle soup (looked to be ramen noodles, but they were called "egg noodles" on the menu) with roasted duck. I have to say, it was actually pretty tasty especially given the low low price of $0. They also put out a dish of lychees on the table when you sit down.


    I wonder if this is the same stuff we had last night in the little food court in the pavilion. I got the seafood noodles and was pleasantly surprised, having had some hideous pho at Aces Diner in Harrah's Joliet.

    We weren't hungry enough to eat at Binion's but with these recent positive reviews I will make a point of trying them. It really is fun sitting in a certain kind of casino bar talking to the regulars.

    10 or so mini-bac tables at Horseshoe-- as opposed to one in Joliet-- means we'll be going back.
  • Post #24 - August 11th, 2008, 8:11 am
    Post #24 - August 11th, 2008, 8:11 am Post #24 - August 11th, 2008, 8:11 am
    bibi rose wrote:
    10 or so mini-bac tables at Horseshoe-- as opposed to one in Joliet-- means we'll be going back.


    I feel really stupid asking this, but then again in my defense, I'm not familiar with casino lingo. What do you mean by mini-bac tables?
  • Post #25 - August 11th, 2008, 9:18 am
    Post #25 - August 11th, 2008, 9:18 am Post #25 - August 11th, 2008, 9:18 am
    dumpstermcnuggets wrote:I feel really stupid asking this, but then again in my defense, I'm not familiar with casino lingo. What do you mean by mini-bac tables?


    Mini-Baccarat. It's Baccarat played on table the same size as a Blackjack table
  • Post #26 - September 20th, 2011, 10:36 am
    Post #26 - September 20th, 2011, 10:36 am Post #26 - September 20th, 2011, 10:36 am
    Going for a comped dinner tonight with a family member who has a penchant for the slots. Anyone been recently? Only mention I could find were a couple years old in a thread on the casino.

    What should I expect? Is anything fair game?

    Jack Binion's Steakhouse
    777 Casino Center Drive
    Hammond, IN
    (219) 473-6028
  • Post #27 - September 20th, 2011, 9:33 pm
    Post #27 - September 20th, 2011, 9:33 pm Post #27 - September 20th, 2011, 9:33 pm
    I have to admit when I saw the title of this thread, I thought, "Damn, that how he can afford to eat out all the time, he has a casino."
  • Post #28 - September 21st, 2011, 8:41 am
    Post #28 - September 21st, 2011, 8:41 am Post #28 - September 21st, 2011, 8:41 am
    jfibro wrote:Going for a comped dinner tonight with a family member who has a penchant for the slots. Anyone been recently? Only mention I could find were a couple years old in a thread on the casino.

    What should I expect? Is anything fair game?

    Jack Binion's Steakhouse
    777 Casino Center Drive
    Hammond, IN
    (219) 473-6028



    Typically comped means comped. I don't gamble much but I got a comped dinner in the steak house there a few years back from a nice floorman.

    We ordered martinis, apps, entrees, sides, dessert and a $150 bottle of wine. We weren't sure how much would be comped and were ready to pay for the wine at least.

    When the bill came the bottom line was totally comped. All we had to do was leave a tip. YMMV.

    By the way, the steakhouse was fairly decent. Not the greatest in town but not bad at all.
    Check out my Blog. http://lessercuts.blogspot.com/
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  • Post #29 - September 21st, 2011, 9:21 am
    Post #29 - September 21st, 2011, 9:21 am Post #29 - September 21st, 2011, 9:21 am
    I've eaten here a couple of times. There is very little to set Jack Binyon's Steakhouse apart from any other mid level steakhouse in the area. Portions are large, cooking is uninspired, but the price is right if you're getting comped.

    One interesting thing on the menu is a tasting platter of various grades of beef. You get small portions of three different grades of steak. When I tried it they offered American prime, American Waygu and Japanese Kobe. Since then, I think they have gotten rid of the Kobe and replaced it with a second grade of Waygu and have downgraded from American Prime to regular grass fed. I thought it was interesting to have all three grades side by side to compare. You could certainly tell the difference between the Kobe and the others, but as I said earlier, the cooking is uninspired so don't expect much in the way of proper seasoning. YMMV. Also, if you're going at prime time, be prepared to duke the Matre 'D or cool your heels in the bar for a while.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven

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