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The Big Baby—A Chicago Burger Style from the SW Side

The Big Baby—A Chicago Burger Style from the SW Side
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  • Post #61 - November 16th, 2007, 6:41 pm
    Post #61 - November 16th, 2007, 6:41 pm Post #61 - November 16th, 2007, 6:41 pm
    Cogito wrote:Is the Nicky's at 24th St & Cicero Ave. owned by the same guy?


    I wouldn't assume so by the name. Nicky's is a very common name for gyro stands on the south/southwest side, for whatever reason. Kind of like Ray's Original/Original Ray's in NYC.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #62 - November 16th, 2007, 7:07 pm
    Post #62 - November 16th, 2007, 7:07 pm Post #62 - November 16th, 2007, 7:07 pm
    gleam wrote:
    Cogito wrote:Is the Nicky's at 24th St & Cicero Ave. owned by the same guy?

    I wouldn't assume so by the name. Nicky's is a very common name for gyro stands on the south/southwest side, for whatever reason. Kind of like Ray's Original/Original Ray's in NYC.

    The Nicky's on Cicero & 24th is owned by the same guy that runs the ones on Kedzie & 58th and Pulaski & 115th but not the one that used to be in Berwyn.

    A big part of the reason Nicky's is a common name for southwest side Greek hamburger stands is many were started in the 1960s by a Greek guy named Nicky.
  • Post #63 - November 16th, 2007, 10:24 pm
    Post #63 - November 16th, 2007, 10:24 pm Post #63 - November 16th, 2007, 10:24 pm
    Once when I was in the one on Roosevelt Rd. in Berwyn, Mrs. Nicky who was working the cash register, told me that they another place on the South side but didn't say where. I'm glad the one on Roosevelt closed down, it sucked.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #64 - December 4th, 2007, 6:18 pm
    Post #64 - December 4th, 2007, 6:18 pm Post #64 - December 4th, 2007, 6:18 pm
    Ann Fisher wrote:Nicky's on Roosevelt in Berwyn, formerly Kings and Queens, and home to the best gyros in the western burbs appears to have gone out of business.

    Very sad.


    I stopped by there last week when I noticed that the place was dark at dinner time and there was a sign in the window mentioning it was closed due to a family issue.

    Yesterday the specials on the sign outside were replaced by the text "Closed".

    I used to frequent the Nicky's on 25 something and Cicero Avenue. They used to have a special either 5 hamburgers or hot dogs for $5.

    Nothing too great but fun for the four kids for a quick picnic at the playground. :)
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #65 - December 13th, 2007, 2:07 pm
    Post #65 - December 13th, 2007, 2:07 pm Post #65 - December 13th, 2007, 2:07 pm
    I went to the Nicky's on 114th and Western...had the Zesty Gyro. Delicious!!!
    At first, i ordered the gyro...and then Nicky must have heard my voice and peeked his head around the corner and said, "What, no Zesty..." I then proceeded to apologize profusely and asked for the zesty...i must have been so excited to have that mound of heaven served on a pita that i forgot about the zest.
    God bless those damned things.
  • Post #66 - February 19th, 2008, 8:35 pm
    Post #66 - February 19th, 2008, 8:35 pm Post #66 - February 19th, 2008, 8:35 pm
    I hope people will understand that I needed a lengthy break from Big Baby research. I'm back on the horse now and thought it was time for an update.

    Evan B. Druce wrote:A candidate for the easternmost Big Baby? Doesn't get much more east before Greek burger joints give way to BBQ and chicken joints than Hyde Park. Hyde Park Gyros on 53rd and Kenwood serves something called a Big Baby . . .

    You're right, this is the farthest east I've seen a Big Baby. Note the portholes on the side of the building, remnants of its previous life as Dock's Fish.

    Image

    Image

    Their version of the Big Baby deviates from the classic recipe in several ways: 1) the patties are grilled, not griddled; 2) cheese is on top of, not between, the two patties; 3) lettuce and tomato are added. When ordering I asked for it "the usual way" without further requests. Even though it didn't meet the standard BB specs it was a decent $2 burger.

    Hyde Park Gyros
    1368 E 53rd St
    Chicago
    773-947-8229

    Evan B. Druce wrote:I don't know if Sammy's serves Big Babies, but I wouldn't be surprised, as it thoroughly passes the Greek burger joint test otherwise.

    I agree Sammy's seems like the sort of place that would serve a Big Baby but they list only a double cheeseburger on the menu.

    Sammy's Touch
    5659 S Cottage Grove Av
    Chicago
    773-288-2645

    JSM wrote:Maxwell St. Express on 87th near Racine. The sign reads Big Baby,Gyros and Polish.

    Sure enough, the most southeastern Big Baby I've seen.

    Image

    Image

    The building is great—a classic Chicago fast food joint. The Big Baby wasn't classic though, with cheese on top of the two patties and onions underneath, not to mention the lettuce and tomato. And the picture doesn't lie: it wasn't great either (pretty lousy actually).

    Maxwell Express
    1058 W 87th St
    Chicago
    773-962-0810

    I guess this just goes to show, the farther from its birthplace around Midway, the less likely it is to find the genuine article.

    Thanks for those Big Baby sightings. Keep 'em coming.
  • Post #67 - March 2nd, 2008, 1:38 pm
    Post #67 - March 2nd, 2008, 1:38 pm Post #67 - March 2nd, 2008, 1:38 pm
    Huh. Interesting stuff. Makes some sense of this: there's a joint in the university district of KC called "Mike's Tavern", been there since the early 60s. Used to be quite the hangout for students, faculty, etc. from both UMKC and Rockhurst U. across the street. In the mid-70s, Mike (there really was a Mike), started serving a new burger, which he called "Mike's Baby Burger". It was, you guessed it! two smallish patties, with a special sauce, pickles, and fried onions, cheese inbetween the patties, toasted/griddled buns. I never figured out where Mike got the idea, nor the name. But obviously, he or his brother Rich either had a Big Baby in Chicago, or someone who did got Mike to try it.

    It was the best damn burger in any bar in KC, no doubt.

    Geo
    PS. Probably sets the record for the farthest-West Big Baby! :)
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #68 - March 21st, 2008, 2:20 pm
    Post #68 - March 21st, 2008, 2:20 pm Post #68 - March 21st, 2008, 2:20 pm
    WHAT ABOUT SOTH SIDE SCHOOPS ? THEY MAKE AN EXCELLENT BURGER. I WOULD PUT THEM UP AGINIST ANY OTHER BURGER.
  • Post #69 - March 21st, 2008, 2:34 pm
    Post #69 - March 21st, 2008, 2:34 pm Post #69 - March 21st, 2008, 2:34 pm
    dbrick59 wrote:WHAT ABOUT SOTH SIDE SCHOOPS ? THEY MAKE AN EXCELLENT BURGER. I WOULD PUT THEM UP AGINIST ANY OTHER BURGER.


    This thread is about The Big Baby burger. While not the best it does have a special place in some posters hearts.

    We do have a thread about the best burgers in the city here. Please do post on that thread and I will add your favorite burger to the list.

    Thanks!
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #70 - January 28th, 2009, 2:54 pm
    Post #70 - January 28th, 2009, 2:54 pm Post #70 - January 28th, 2009, 2:54 pm
    What a great thread! I grew up with Big Baby's at the Nicky's on Archer and Austin as my Grandparents and Aunt lived in the area. My Aunt still does and I always try to stop for a Big Baby when I can. Growing up in the west suburbs I always tried to explain to my friends the beauty of the Big Baby but they could never understand. Thought it was just a typical burger, which it pretty much is, but damn it is good. Such a cool thread, thanks!
    "I Like Food, Food Tastes Good" - The Descendants
  • Post #71 - February 8th, 2009, 10:17 pm
    Post #71 - February 8th, 2009, 10:17 pm Post #71 - February 8th, 2009, 10:17 pm
    thepld wrote:Thought it was just a typical burger, which it pretty much is, but damn it is good. Such a cool thread, thanks!

    Pleased to hear you’re a fan of the Big Baby and this thread. Here’s a little more information you might enjoy.

    Years ago Erik M. wrote:Rene G has adapted his original Big Baby report for this week's featured food article in Time Out Chicago.

    I don’t believe this article was originally available online but I came across it recently.
  • Post #72 - February 9th, 2009, 7:40 am
    Post #72 - February 9th, 2009, 7:40 am Post #72 - February 9th, 2009, 7:40 am
    Rene G wrote:Basically a Big Baby is two griddled beef patties with cheese on a toasted sesame seed bun. It comes dressed with mustard, ketchup, dill pickle, and grilled onion.


    As I was born on the North Shore and have only lived North of Madison I am not that familiar with the exigencies of the south side and its food. I am grateful to Rene G, I have learned and tasted more great things based on your detective work than I care to admit to anyone, mostly my wife and my cardiologist.

    However, the Big Baby is something I dont quite understand. Are we just talking about a double cheeseburger with grillled onion? I have certaintly had this sandwich at any number of hot dog stands all over town. Is it the fact that certain places call it a Big Baby that is of interest. I dont get it. This sandwich existed before Nicky Vaginas called it a Big Baby. I dont see myslef traveling down to Midway to try this when I can get a great, and I mean GREAT, double cheeseburger with grilled onions at Poochies. Please help me with what I am missing, besides the nostalgia for misspent, southside youth.
  • Post #73 - February 9th, 2009, 8:39 am
    Post #73 - February 9th, 2009, 8:39 am Post #73 - February 9th, 2009, 8:39 am
    Rene G wrote:Basically a Big Baby is two griddled beef patties with cheese on a toasted sesame seed bun. It comes dressed with mustard, ketchup, dill pickle, and grilled onion. Upon ordering, the grillman slaps down two one-sixth pound patties onto the griddle and prods them a bit with the corner and edge of the spatula as they cook. The bun is placed alongside on the griddle to toast and catch a few spatters of fat. When the patties are almost done, a slice of American cheese is placed on one, and the other patty is put on top to hasten melting of the cheese. The bottom of the now-toasted bun gets squirts of mustard and ketchup, then 3 or 4 dill pickle slices are laid on. The burger stack is crowned with a tongful of pre-made grilled onions, transferred to the waiting bun, and the whole assembly is wrapped in a sheet of plain waxed paper. The price at Nicky's is $2.19 or two for $3.99. Not an elegant burger but greasy and good in a reassuringly old-fashioned way.

    The method of cooking is distinctive: the patties getting cut into while cooking with a single piece of cheese in the middle that melts into the meat and pretty much disapeers.

    This is not your Poochies double-cheese burger ... though at Herm's Palace on Saturday there was a double-cheese burger with bacon and grilled onions that someone ordered that looked spectacular, but I digress.

    I think the Big Baby is an interesting very small regional style worth trying at least once.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #74 - February 9th, 2009, 1:38 pm
    Post #74 - February 9th, 2009, 1:38 pm Post #74 - February 9th, 2009, 1:38 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:The method of cooking is distinctive: the patties getting cut into while cooking with a single piece of cheese in the middle that melts into the meat and pretty much disapeers.


    Griddled instead of grilled. Sounds good if you are looking for a greasy burger and sometimes that is exactly what i am looking for. The use of one piece of cheese as opposed too two doesn't sound like it adds anything to the sandwich unless you dont like a lot of cheese on your burger. I am not trying to be argumentative, but is it the size of the patty and cutting it so the cheese melts in, the single piece of cheese and the griddle that make it a distinctive burger? I can get a griddled cheeseburger with grilled onions at The Chuck Wagon in Wilmette and they have been making them this way for 35 years.

    I get prefering a griddled burger over grilled, to each his own. But why are small patties and one slice of cheese a good thing? If this is a purely academic discussion and we are just noting the fact that the Big Baby exists thats one thing, but from my read of the posts upthread it seems like people are enamored of the Big Baby. As far as griddled burgers being a regional thing, I have had griddled burgers all over the south, in particular at Louie's in Baton Rouge and at The Camelia Grill in New Orleans, both cooked on a flattop.

    I suppose I will need to take Cathy2's suggestion and try a Big Baby to fully understand it. Life is tough :)
  • Post #75 - February 9th, 2009, 5:10 pm
    Post #75 - February 9th, 2009, 5:10 pm Post #75 - February 9th, 2009, 5:10 pm
    iblock9 wrote:I am not trying to be argumentative, but is it the size of the patty and cutting it so the cheese melts in, the single piece of cheese and the griddle that make it a distinctive burger?


    That with the sloppy mess of greasy onions and the sesame seed bun. No lettuce, no tomato, just ketchup, mustard, pickles, and the aforementioned onions. Is there anything that makes this hamburger stand out? I don't know, but it's a taste of home for me. There's a certain oniony-greasiness Big Babies have that similar sandwiches just don't. Plus I love the 1/6 lb patties, having always been a fan of the thinner patties. Is it something transcendent? Nah, but a good burger to get to help soak up the alcohol....
    Last edited by Binko on February 10th, 2009, 1:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #76 - February 9th, 2009, 10:21 pm
    Post #76 - February 9th, 2009, 10:21 pm Post #76 - February 9th, 2009, 10:21 pm
    I also believe a major draw of the Big Baby has always been price which I believe is currently around $2.25.
    "I drink to make other people more interesting."
    Ernest Hemingway
  • Post #77 - February 9th, 2009, 10:40 pm
    Post #77 - February 9th, 2009, 10:40 pm Post #77 - February 9th, 2009, 10:40 pm
    Marshall K wrote:I also believe a major draw of the Big Baby has always been price which I believe is currently around $2.25.


    That's pretty high.. a few years ago they were going for $1.29-$1.49. They're cheap, filling, greasy food. They're good for what they are.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #78 - February 10th, 2009, 1:08 am
    Post #78 - February 10th, 2009, 1:08 am Post #78 - February 10th, 2009, 1:08 am
    iblock9 wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Basically a Big Baby is two griddled beef patties with cheese on a toasted sesame seed bun. It comes dressed with mustard, ketchup, dill pickle, and grilled onion.


    This sandwich existed before Nicky Vaginas called it a Big Baby.


    1. So is my McDouble technically a Big Baby? Since they took the 2nd cheese slice off the Double Cheeseburger, I have noticed the surviving single cheese slice is placed between the 2 small patties. And there are onions.

    2. I think if any entity named Vaginas gives birth to something called a Big Baby, we ought to take their word on its origin and legal name.
  • Post #79 - February 10th, 2009, 1:42 am
    Post #79 - February 10th, 2009, 1:42 am Post #79 - February 10th, 2009, 1:42 am
    Marco wrote:1. So is my McDouble technically a Big Baby? Since they took the 2nd cheese slice off the Double Cheeseburger, I have noticed the surviving single cheese slice is placed between the 2 small patties. And there are onions.


    Nope. No sesame seed bun, and the onions aren't the greasy fried mess that goes on a Big Baby. This is a big part of what makes a Big Baby a Big Baby.
  • Post #80 - February 10th, 2009, 4:00 am
    Post #80 - February 10th, 2009, 4:00 am Post #80 - February 10th, 2009, 4:00 am
    iblock9 wrote:However, the Big Baby is something I dont quite understand. Are we just talking about a double cheeseburger with grillled onion? I have certaintly had this sandwich at any number of hot dog stands all over town. Is it the fact that certain places call it a Big Baby that is of interest. I dont get it. This sandwich existed before Nicky Vaginas called it a Big Baby. I dont see myslef traveling down to Midway to try this when I can get a great, and I mean GREAT, double cheeseburger with grilled onions at Poochies. Please help me with what I am missing, besides the nostalgia for misspent, southside youth.

    I hope I didn't give the impression that the Big Baby is one of Chicago's best burgers. It's not (but for under $2 you can do much worse). For me the interest lies in the fact that a uniform burger style has saturated a relatively small area of Chicago yet it remains unknown to much of the city. I had fun figuring out how that came to be.

    As I said before, Nicky's certainly didn't invent the double cheeseburger but they named a particular style that became a local standard. At many Big Baby vendors the preparation is surprisingly invariant: always two small patties, always griddled, always a sesame seed bun (also griddled), always cheese between the patties, condiments (always ketchup, mustard and pickles, often applied in that order) always on the bottom, and—most important—always a big knot of greasy sautéed onions on top.

    Big Baby from Nicky's, Archer & Austin
    Image

    iblock9 wrote:I can get a griddled cheeseburger with grilled onions at The Chuck Wagon in Wilmette and they have been making them this way for 35 years.

    Interesting that you mention The Chuck Wagon. It's come up before in discussions of the Big Baby. I have yet to visit but I suspect their version of a Greek diner burger is close in spirit to a Big Baby.
  • Post #81 - February 10th, 2009, 5:26 pm
    Post #81 - February 10th, 2009, 5:26 pm Post #81 - February 10th, 2009, 5:26 pm
    With this thread setting my mouth a watering and Tuesday's being my 'grab a quick lunch' day I had some errands to run and took the trip up Harlem Avenue stopping at every place that I could think of.

    Usually I can eat at least 2 Big Baby's so my plan was to eat one on my way to my final destination of Mickey's.

    Lucky Dog on 16th? Nope. Just a full dressed double for $3.80.
    Byron's on Madison in Forest Park? Nope. $3.58. Not bad for fully dressed!
    Deko's on Madison east of Des Plaines? Had a sign in the window but way too expensive ($5.00)! No discount for a fry delete either.

    Image

    Beloved Parky's? Nope. Fully Dressed for $4.15.

    Finally I ended up at my final destination of Mickey's. Good thing too as it was awesome. :)

    Image

    Rene G wrote:At many Big Baby vendors the preparation is surprisingly invariant: always two small patties, always griddled, always a sesame seed bun (also griddled), always cheese between the patties, condiments (always ketchup, mustard and pickles, often applied in that order) always on the bottom, and—most important—always a big knot of greasy sautéed onions on top.


    Ok, ok. They did deviate from the traditional assembly. Two slices of cheese. Onions in the middle... Also they call the double hamburger The Big Baby and the double cheeseburger The Big Mickey.

    Image

    Cooked perfectly with the cheese well melted and a lot of onions. Great deal for $1.79!

    Image

    After eating the big pair I was quite satisfied! It doesn't get any better than this. :)

    Image

    Mickey's Gyros & Ribs
    525 N Harlem Ave, Oak Park
    (708) 848-3333

    Edit? Added Byron's.
    Last edited by Panther in the Den on February 13th, 2009, 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #82 - February 10th, 2009, 6:58 pm
    Post #82 - February 10th, 2009, 6:58 pm Post #82 - February 10th, 2009, 6:58 pm
    Panther, you're going to need to have your arteries flushed out soon. Count me as one of the people who can't really understand the "uniqueness" of the Big Baby. A double cheeseburger with grilled onions by another name still smells sweet.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #83 - February 10th, 2009, 7:07 pm
    Post #83 - February 10th, 2009, 7:07 pm Post #83 - February 10th, 2009, 7:07 pm
    Cogito wrote:Panther, you're going to need to have your arteries flushed out soon. Count me as one of the people who can't really understand the "uniqueness" of the Big Baby. A double cheeseburger with grilled onions by another name still smells sweet.


    I've had my share of Big Babies, and like ReneG, I'd never put them out there as gastronomic triumphs, but like him, I think it's downright fascinatin' that this burger configuration has taken root -- and apparently made a name for itself -- in a specific geographic area. It's not so much the taste of the thing but the fact of its existence that is so entertaining (at least to those of us so amused by such things).
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #84 - February 10th, 2009, 9:30 pm
    Post #84 - February 10th, 2009, 9:30 pm Post #84 - February 10th, 2009, 9:30 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    Cogito wrote:Panther, you're going to need to have your arteries flushed out soon. Count me as one of the people who can't really understand the "uniqueness" of the Big Baby. A double cheeseburger with grilled onions by another name still smells sweet.


    I've had my share of Big Babies, and like ReneG, I'd never put them out there as gastronomic triumphs, but like him, I think it's downright fascinatin' that this burger configuration has taken root -- and apparently made a name for itself -- in a specific geographic area. It's not so much the taste of the thing but the fact of its existence that is so entertaining (at least to those of us so amused by such things).


    I didn't eat at all of the places. :) Just Mickey's. It was a late night and the burgers held be over until now (late dinner).

    I was thinking about the taste while eating. Something about the lack of lettuce, tomato and the attendant water that allows almost all of the flavors come thru. I was tasting beef, cheese, onion, pickles, mustard and the other toppings less.

    It is nice to savor the flavors. Nice and clean (albeit greasy).

    Maybe Chicago is a grilled onion town? Think Maxwell Polish. Think the onions on the El Pastor Taco's at El Burrito Amigo.
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #85 - February 11th, 2009, 12:38 am
    Post #85 - February 11th, 2009, 12:38 am Post #85 - February 11th, 2009, 12:38 am
    David Hammond wrote:
    Cogito wrote:Panther, you're going to need to have your arteries flushed out soon. Count me as one of the people who can't really understand the "uniqueness" of the Big Baby. A double cheeseburger with grilled onions by another name still smells sweet.


    I've had my share of Big Babies, and like ReneG, I'd never put them out there as gastronomic triumphs, but like him, I think it's downright fascinatin' that this burger configuration has taken root -- and apparently made a name for itself -- in a specific geographic area. It's not so much the taste of the thing but the fact of its existence that is so entertaining (at least to those of us so amused by such things).

    David, I've coined a name for those of us who are challenged in that special way which way prevents us from recognizing the unique niche filled by the Big Baby. You can call us the big cry babies. :D
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #86 - February 13th, 2009, 2:31 pm
    Post #86 - February 13th, 2009, 2:31 pm Post #86 - February 13th, 2009, 2:31 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    iblock9 wrote:I can get a griddled cheeseburger with grilled onions at The Chuck Wagon in Wilmette and they have been making them this way for 35 years.

    Interesting that you mention The Chuck Wagon. It's come up before in discussions of the Big Baby. I have yet to visit but I suspect their version of a Greek diner burger is close in spirit to a Big Baby.

    The double cheeseburger at Wilmette Chuck Wagon is indeed quite similar to a Big Baby and could probably pass for one down around Midway. Except I doubt many southsiders would pay the $5 price (without fries)—two to three times the local rate.

    Image

    Like a classic Big Baby, Chuck Wagon's double cheeseburger consists of two thin, griddled, pre-fab patties on a griddle-toasted sesame seed bun. Mustard, ketchup and pickles are the usual condiments. But the burger deviates from the Big Baby formula in several ways. Lettuce and tomato are standard and grilled onion (the Big Baby's defining feature) must be requested. A minor thing perhaps but the placement of onions and cheese is different than the way Nicky taught his followers. It's a good diner burger but the flavor is somewhat different than what you'd get from Nicky's at Archer & Austin or 58th & Kedzie (two places that still adhere to the classic style). Chuck Wagon's is cheesier (they use two slices) but doesn't have the dominant onion presence (they used pre-made, paper-wrapped onions taken from the refrigerator). I'm not saying one is better than the other, they're just a little different.

    Image

    Overall I liked the Chuck Wagon and particularly enjoyed some of the menu names. I'm a bit of a sucker for that sort of thing (hence my interest in the Big Baby). Are there any other places in the north suburbs that serve a Losh?

    Wilmette Chuck Wagon
    1120 Central Av
    Wilmette IL
    847-256-0120
  • Post #87 - February 13th, 2009, 4:07 pm
    Post #87 - February 13th, 2009, 4:07 pm Post #87 - February 13th, 2009, 4:07 pm
    Rene G wrote:Overall I liked the Chuck Wagon and particularly enjoyed some of the menu names. I'm a bit of a sucker for that sort of thing (hence my interest in the Big Baby). Are there any other places in the north suburbs that serve a Losh?

    I've never seen a Losh anywhere else and I'm pretty sure it's a newer item at Chuck Wagon. I also love their Waitress, which is kind of like the Gyros Melt at CND Gyros Lounge but better, for reasons that I have never completely analyzed.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #88 - February 13th, 2009, 6:27 pm
    Post #88 - February 13th, 2009, 6:27 pm Post #88 - February 13th, 2009, 6:27 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Overall I liked the Chuck Wagon and particularly enjoyed some of the menu names. I'm a bit of a sucker for that sort of thing (hence my interest in the Big Baby). Are there any other places in the north suburbs that serve a Losh?

    I've never seen a Losh anywhere else and I'm pretty sure it's a newer item at Chuck Wagon. I also love their Waitress, which is kind of like the Gyros Melt at CND Gyros Lounge but better, for reasons that I have never completely analyzed.

    =R=

    Made me Google.

    Wikipedia (Armenian Cuisine) wrote:Grilled meats

    Grilling (barbecue) is very popular in Armenia, and grilled meats are often the main course in restaurants and at family gatherings. Grilled meat is also eaten as fast food.

    Khorovats (or khorovadz) – Armenian word for barbecued or grilled meats (the generic kebab in English), the most representative dish of Armenian cuisine enjoyed in restaurants, family gatherings, and as fast food. A typical khorovats is chunks of meat grilled on a skewer (shashlik), although steaks or chops grilled without skewers may be also included. In Armenia itself, khorovats is often made with the bone still in the meat (as lamb or pork chops). Western Armenians outside Armenia generally cook the meat with bones taken out and call it by the Turkish name shish kebab.

    On the other hand, the word kebab in Armenia refers to uncased sausage-shaped patties from ground meat grilled on a skewer (called losh kebab or lule kebab by diasporan Armenians and Turks). In Armenia today, the most popular meat for khorovats (including losh kebab) is pork due to Soviet-era economic heritage. Armenians outside Armenia usually prefer lamb or beef depending on their background, and chicken is also popular.

    Sounds good!
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #89 - February 13th, 2009, 6:32 pm
    Post #89 - February 13th, 2009, 6:32 pm Post #89 - February 13th, 2009, 6:32 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:Sounds good!


    Sounds like a kefta kebob.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #90 - February 13th, 2009, 6:43 pm
    Post #90 - February 13th, 2009, 6:43 pm Post #90 - February 13th, 2009, 6:43 pm
    Rene G wrote:Overall I liked the Chuck Wagon and particularly enjoyed some of the menu names. I'm a bit of a sucker for that sort of thing (hence my interest in the Big Baby). Are there any other places in the north suburbs that serve a Losh?


    ReneG,
    I am glad you liked the Chuck Wagon. We used to ride our bikes there when we were kids. That grill has 35+ years of seasoning on it which I think adds to the deliciousness factor. I hope you tried the Niki as it is, IMHO, the defining sandwich at the Chuck Wagon.

    You might be interested to try the sandwiches at Sarkis, an institution in Northwest Evanston. Both the Disaster and the Lorretta are long time cult favorites. Just ask any kid who grew up on the North Shore from 1975-present. EVERYONE cut class to go visit with Sarkis. The disaster is a sausage sandwich and a Lorretta is a modified ham and cheese (or bacon and cheese in the case of the Bacon Lorretta). Sarkis was a real character but he sold the restaurant about 10 years ago and the rumor is that he has since passed away. This is however, untrue, as he was recently spotted at the Northfield Starbucks by a friend of mine who snapped a cell phone photo. The food is still pretty much the same and if you grew up with it, you are a fan of the Sark!

    Sarkis Restaurant
    2632 Gross Point Rd
    Evanston, IL 60201-4965

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