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Gefilte fish
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    Post #1 - April 19th, 2008, 12:55 am
    Post #1 - April 19th, 2008, 12:55 am Post #1 - April 19th, 2008, 12:55 am
    I just came across an amusing video of Abbie Hoffman talking about gefilte fish (and Dr. Spock):
    Abbie Hoffman on gefilte fish

    Disappointingly, it only shows his fish at the end of the segment, all made, not the cooking process. So here's a how-to:
    How to make (Australian) gefilte fish for Passover

    You'll find the only recipe I consider worth making from scratch here:
    Baked gefilte fish
  • Post #2 - April 20th, 2008, 10:29 am
    Post #2 - April 20th, 2008, 10:29 am Post #2 - April 20th, 2008, 10:29 am
    LAZ wrote:You'll find the only recipe I consider worth making from scratch here:
    Baked gefilte fish


    LAZ:

    I think making gefilte the "old-fashioned" way can definitely be worth making, although I wasn't going to do so this year until I found some beautiful pike and whitefish at WFM. Stock made from scratch, fish chopped by hand, etc.

    Image

    I'll admit it is a lot of effort - it took my wife and I two hours to get it into the pot - but we enjoyed every minute.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #3 - April 20th, 2008, 10:39 am
    Post #3 - April 20th, 2008, 10:39 am Post #3 - April 20th, 2008, 10:39 am
    Bill,

    For the love of Moses, that's some beautiful looking fish! My Mom didn't make any fish this year. Next year, I'm taking on the mantle of making gefilte fish for our family. Your post has inspired me.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #4 - April 20th, 2008, 11:48 am
    Post #4 - April 20th, 2008, 11:48 am Post #4 - April 20th, 2008, 11:48 am
    Bill,

    For the second time today I feel the need to invoke Carol Channing.

    Sweet Carol Channing's Ghost your Gefilte fish looks incredible!

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #5 - April 20th, 2008, 12:07 pm
    Post #5 - April 20th, 2008, 12:07 pm Post #5 - April 20th, 2008, 12:07 pm
    Thank you stevez and Gary. I really envy you guys having access to the correct fish for this dish. Finding fresh pike and whitefish here was a real surprise. Usually they doctor up some ground halibut which is barely better than the jarred stuff. :roll:
  • Post #6 - April 20th, 2008, 6:48 pm
    Post #6 - April 20th, 2008, 6:48 pm Post #6 - April 20th, 2008, 6:48 pm
    LAZ wrote:You'll find the only recipe I consider worth making from scratch here:
    Baked gefilte fish
    Bill/SFNM wrote:I think making gefilte the "old-fashioned" way can definitely be worth making, although I wasn't going to do so this year until I found some beautiful pike and whitefish at WFM. Stock made from scratch, fish chopped by hand, etc.

    That's gorgeous fish, Bill.

    If I do say so, the homemade fish I used to make was beautiful, too -- but as mentioned in the linked post, it was a letdown to find that after all the effort, it tasted very little better than Bubbe's "doctored up" version. The "doctoring up," however, definitely improves jarred fish. If you start with a good commercial product, you can get very tasty results, even if they don't look quite so lovely.

    The baked recipe is ugly in comparison, but the flavor is remarkably different and delicious. Of course, it is not so healthful as traditional gefilte fish.
  • Post #7 - April 20th, 2008, 7:26 pm
    Post #7 - April 20th, 2008, 7:26 pm Post #7 - April 20th, 2008, 7:26 pm
    I am usually the gefilte fish maker in the family, but this year my mother asked me to bring something else. She used the frozen gefilte fish she found at Jewel, claiming it was just delicious. I think she was the only one who found it to be tasty -- I'll be making fish next year, even if she tells me not to.

    It will most definitely annoy my children, who complain about how bad the house smells while I am making my stock and boiling my fish.

    Bill, I was envious of your fish when I saw the pictures!

    Suzy
    " There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life."
    - Frank Zappa
  • Post #8 - April 21st, 2008, 7:11 pm
    Post #8 - April 21st, 2008, 7:11 pm Post #8 - April 21st, 2008, 7:11 pm
    Is there as much of a bias in Chicago against carp as there is in Cleveland? My mother taught me how to make her fish (and we were livelong New Yorkers) with 1 part whitefish, 1 part pike and 1/2 part carp. The carp, which is of course a gutter fish, is for texture and mouthfeel more than taste.

    I try to make fish once a year, because its a "feel" dish and I don't want to lose it. The whole megillah is on my blog - www.funplayingwithfood.blogspot.com - but here are a few photos:

    Image
    Raw Fish Mix from Cleveland's Mister Brisket http://www.misterbrisket.com/NewFiles/whoishe.html- 2# Whitefish, 2# Pike, 1# Carp (and you wouldn't believe how I had to beg and plead the first time I asked for carp!) Ground With Onion

    Image
    Making the Fish Stock

    While the stock simmers, I add fresh eggs, fresh ground white pepper, kosher salt and matzo meal to the fish, and bring it together until it "feels" right. Then - shaped into ovals and into the pot! Add carrots after the first 1.5 hours, then cook another 1.5 hours. Chill and:

    Image

    I cannot eat jarred fish, no matter what you do to it. And what to eat with the fish but home made Horseradish, from our garden:

    Image

    Image

    Image[/b]

    Happy Passover, LTHers!
    Life Is Too Short To Not Play With Your Food
    My Blog: http://funplayingwithfood.blogspot.com
  • Post #9 - September 19th, 2017, 10:36 am
    Post #9 - September 19th, 2017, 10:36 am Post #9 - September 19th, 2017, 10:36 am
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-still-ha ... 1505748453
  • Post #10 - September 20th, 2017, 5:58 am
    Post #10 - September 20th, 2017, 5:58 am Post #10 - September 20th, 2017, 5:58 am
    Thanks for the Referenced article.
    I can remember jarred Gefilte fish going back decades until I decided to make my own.
    With fresh filleted fish being easy to obtain these days and the ubiquitous food processor, it's relatively easy to make.
    But I would hate to see those jars disappear from grocery shelves!-Richard
  • Post #11 - September 20th, 2017, 10:08 am
    Post #11 - September 20th, 2017, 10:08 am Post #11 - September 20th, 2017, 10:08 am
    The key, I recently discovered, is using as little matzoh meal as possible to hold the pieces together. The less you use, the lighter and more tender your fish will be. For the first time ever I made a very successful batch of gefilte fish using this recipe by Joan Nathan from Jewish Cooking in America (1st edition), as relayed by Corby Kummer. I tweaked it a bit, omitted the parsnip, cut the sugar in half, added a bit of extra salt, etc. but overall, the instructions were solid. In the end, I could/should have even used less matzoh meal than the recipe called for but still the results were excellent.

    And this bit of information also proved quite useful:

    *Ask your fishmonger to grind the fish. Ask him to reserve the tails, fins, heads, and bones. Be sure he gives you the bones and trimmings. The more whitefish you add, the softer your gefilte fish will be.


    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #12 - September 20th, 2017, 11:42 am
    Post #12 - September 20th, 2017, 11:42 am Post #12 - September 20th, 2017, 11:42 am
    I have made my last few batches without any matzo meal at all. I originally eliminated it so I could give some to a friend who is gluten free, but then I found I liked the lighter texture. I use about half whitefish and half carp. It is very light - like approaching matzo ball territory. Ultimately, I remember them being a bit meatier growing up. I'm still undecided as to which way I like best.

    I also like to sweat the vegetables (leeks, parsnips, and onion) with dill and parsley and then process that with the egg before mixing it into the fish. I like the subtle herby undertones that method produces.
  • Post #13 - September 20th, 2017, 11:50 am
    Post #13 - September 20th, 2017, 11:50 am Post #13 - September 20th, 2017, 11:50 am
    gastro gnome wrote:I have made my last few batches without any matzo meal at all. I originally eliminated it so I could give some to a friend who is gluten free, but then I found I liked the lighter texture. I use about half whitefish and half carp. It is very light - like approaching matzo ball territory. Ultimately, I remember them being a bit meatier growing up. I'm still undecided as to which way I like best.

    Interesting. I'll try that next time; making a few without matzoh meal as testers before I decide whether or not to add any matzoh meal to the rest of the batch.

    My most recent batch, my first genuine success with this dish, was, perhaps, a bit heavier than I would have chosen from a purely culinary point of view but it was almost an exact match texturally to what my Grandma used to make, so in that respect, the endeavor was a huge success.

    Also, I forgot to mention this earlier but homemade horseradish is a must. It's so potent compared to even the freshest store-bought, and definitely worth the effort. Just be sure to have some ski goggles on hand because you really do need to grate it by hand and it stings your eyes like a motherf*cker when you're standing over it grating.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #14 - September 20th, 2017, 3:40 pm
    Post #14 - September 20th, 2017, 3:40 pm Post #14 - September 20th, 2017, 3:40 pm
    Grate it on the stove top with your exhaust fan on high.

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