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  • Bi Bim Bop

    Post #1 - November 9th, 2004, 2:54 pm
    Post #1 - November 9th, 2004, 2:54 pm Post #1 - November 9th, 2004, 2:54 pm
    Although I believe this dish is of Korean origins, it can be found in vegetarian restaurants, neighborhood diners and other Asian eateries. I'd like recommendations and opinions for prime examples of this favorite dish. Thanks...
  • Post #2 - November 9th, 2004, 3:15 pm
  • Post #3 - November 9th, 2004, 3:54 pm
    Post #3 - November 9th, 2004, 3:54 pm Post #3 - November 9th, 2004, 3:54 pm
    While living in Korea for a year, this was one of my favoite dishes. I don't know if it was the flavor or the presentation, but you have to love it when they serve you a hot earthen bowl filled with goodies and a raw egg on top which cooks when you mix everything together. I finally got my wife to go with my to Jin Ju about a year ago and from what I remember, the Bi Bim Bop was just as good if not better than what I had in Korea. I can't wait to have some again.
  • Post #4 - November 9th, 2004, 5:28 pm
    Post #4 - November 9th, 2004, 5:28 pm Post #4 - November 9th, 2004, 5:28 pm
    The Chicago Mike of Thai and NYC expertise? Welcome, either way.
  • Post #5 - November 11th, 2004, 9:41 pm
    Post #5 - November 11th, 2004, 9:41 pm Post #5 - November 11th, 2004, 9:41 pm
    Bi bim bap's not my favorite Korean dish (I'm surprisingly fond of the standard beef/pork/combination fried rice dishes), but if you're looking for the bi bim in the stone platter (watch out, hot!), then make sure to ask for "dol sot bi bim bap" (if they do that there).
  • Post #6 - May 15th, 2010, 2:20 pm
    Post #6 - May 15th, 2010, 2:20 pm Post #6 - May 15th, 2010, 2:20 pm
    My family really wanted a good bibimbap fix today and we have been to Crisp in Lakeview (a decent alternative), but since the 24 hour joint on Lawrence closed down a couple of years ago--we have not found a great place.
    Today we went to the old place in the mini-mall on Kedzie and it was no good. All the veggies and meat were freezing cold--once stirred into the rice, the whole dish was cold. The sauce seemed from a jar and the bulgogi was mediocre, at best--pretty flavorless and not grilled.

    Any hot pick from our LTH friends?
  • Post #7 - May 17th, 2010, 12:09 pm
    Post #7 - May 17th, 2010, 12:09 pm Post #7 - May 17th, 2010, 12:09 pm
    nancy wrote:My family really wanted a good bibimbap fix today and we have been to Crisp in Lakeview (a decent alternative), but since the 24 hour joint on Lawrence closed down a couple of years ago--we have not found a great place.
    Today we went to the old place in the mini-mall on Kedzie and it was no good. All the veggies and meat were freezing cold--once stirred into the rice, the whole dish was cold. The sauce seemed from a jar and the bulgogi was mediocre, at best--pretty flavorless and not grilled.

    Any hot pick from our LTH friends?


    while I don't see anything wrong with a cold bibimbop, freezing veggies don't sound appetizing at all. I would recommend that you try out San Chae Dol Sot on Lawrence.

    3737 W Lawrence Ave
    Chicago, IL 60625

    this place is supposed to specialize in dishes served in a hot stone bowl, but I would say this place specializes in bibimbaps as well, since I believe there's close to 10 versions on their menu. Some of the variations are served in the hot stone bowl, so you get the nice crispy rice on the bottom too.

    um.... side notes: closed on Sundays, only sign outside says "korean restaurant", so just go by the address. service is on the slow side, but I wouldn't say it's bad.
  • Post #8 - May 17th, 2010, 3:25 pm
    Post #8 - May 17th, 2010, 3:25 pm Post #8 - May 17th, 2010, 3:25 pm
    I like the dolsot bibimbap from the food court at Super H Mart in Niles. The egg that they put on it is raw however, and cooks while you mix it into the rice/beef/veggies. If that skeeves you out, then this may not be the place for you. I like going to the food court for a bite, then I do my shopping at Super H. The $10 bibimbap saves me $50 from that I would have put in my cart if I was shopping while hungry.

    The other good thing about the bibimbap at the food court (center "Korean" vendor)is getting a side of kimchi dumpling to go with it from the dumpling vendor (at the end of the court on the left).

    If you put bibimbap in the search, you will find a few other suggestions from Korean BBQ joints from others here.
  • Post #9 - May 17th, 2010, 4:18 pm
    Post #9 - May 17th, 2010, 4:18 pm Post #9 - May 17th, 2010, 4:18 pm
    I always enjoy the version in the little food court at Joong Boo on Kimball...(egg cooked)
  • Post #10 - May 17th, 2010, 4:29 pm
    Post #10 - May 17th, 2010, 4:29 pm Post #10 - May 17th, 2010, 4:29 pm
    CM2772 wrote:I like the dolsot bibimbap from the food court at Super H Mart in Niles. .


    I will second the above!

    Also going after 6:15pm means you'll get two for one sometimes three for one pricing on sushi and sashimi from Tokyo Lunchbox.
  • Post #11 - May 17th, 2010, 7:10 pm
    Post #11 - May 17th, 2010, 7:10 pm Post #11 - May 17th, 2010, 7:10 pm
    kenji wrote:
    CM2772 wrote:I like the dolsot bibimbap from the food court at Super H Mart in Niles. .


    I will second the above!

    Also going after 6:15pm means you'll get two for one sometimes three for one pricing on sushi and sashimi from Tokyo Lunchbox.


    Thirded! Though I never realized the egg was raw - it must be that it's sooo sizzling hot that if your nine-year-old distracts you for a minute, it's cooked. Plus if you time it right you can be eating it while watching the Jumbotron video recipe and listening to '80s hits.
  • Post #12 - May 17th, 2010, 9:38 pm
    Post #12 - May 17th, 2010, 9:38 pm Post #12 - May 17th, 2010, 9:38 pm
    Hi,

    This query was merged into an existing bi bim bap (note alternative spelling) thread.

    For completeness, there was a discussion of sauce used with bi bim bap here.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - May 17th, 2010, 10:13 pm
    Post #13 - May 17th, 2010, 10:13 pm Post #13 - May 17th, 2010, 10:13 pm
    I'm certainly no expert but the dolsot bibimbap at Kang Nam on Kedzie is outstanding and one of the best versions -- if not the best -- I've had in Chicago . . .

    Image
    Dolsot Bibimbap at Kang Nam

    =R=

    Kang Nam
    4849 N Kedzie Ave
    Chicago, IL 60625-5206
    (773) 539-2524
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #14 - May 18th, 2010, 5:07 am
    Post #14 - May 18th, 2010, 5:07 am Post #14 - May 18th, 2010, 5:07 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I'm certainly no expert but the dolsot bibimbap at Kang Nam on Kedzie is outstanding and one of the best versions -- if not the best -- I've had in Chicago . . .
    Ron,

    I think Kang Nam, which is my favorite dolsot bibimbap in Chicago as well, is the restaurant Nancy was referring to in her post.
    nancy wrote:Today we went to the old place in the mini-mall on Kedzie and it was no good.


    For standard, by which I mean non dolsot, bibimbap I like Hai Woon Dae and Crystal Korean.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Hae Woon Dae
    6240 N California
    Chicago, IL 60659

    Crystal Korean Restaurant
    5800 N Lincoln
    Chicago, IL 60659
    773-275-0489
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #15 - May 18th, 2010, 9:02 am
    Post #15 - May 18th, 2010, 9:02 am Post #15 - May 18th, 2010, 9:02 am
    I'd say the OP had an unusual experience at Kang Nam, if that's where she went. If OP wants to ensure hot and crispy BBB, she should always pay the small upcharge for the dolsot. Also, it is not at all unusual for the veggies added a la minute to BBB to be cool. They are likely coming from the panchan bins. Some also might contend that the contrasts in temp along with the textural contrasts is one of the dish's strengths. Cold meat is a different story.

    If Crips is the standard, I think OP can do much better. Not that Crisp isn't good. I like their chicken. I have had the BBB and thought it was pretty weak. For a BBB fix in a Lakeview neighborhood classic, try Hamburger King. No dolsot, though.
  • Post #16 - May 18th, 2010, 12:46 pm
    Post #16 - May 18th, 2010, 12:46 pm Post #16 - May 18th, 2010, 12:46 pm
    Thanks all! Kang Nam was the restaurant we went to. I don't like the dolsat as much as a regular, so that is what I am looking for. Crisp is not my "standard", but--I am writing because I do expect fresh, hot meat with all the temp contrasts that another post referred to! I will hit the streets to try these recommendations!
  • Post #17 - May 18th, 2010, 2:19 pm
    Post #17 - May 18th, 2010, 2:19 pm Post #17 - May 18th, 2010, 2:19 pm
    My understanding is that cold (or room-temp), seasoned vegetables (namul) atop standard bi bim bap is authentic and normal, as far as my understanding--although I'm not a Korean expert and I could be wrong, but this is my understanding from many years of eating it.

    Bi bim bap is, at its heart, warm rice with namul/banchan, egg, chili paste, and maybe meat.

    I believe that more americanized Korean and pan-Asian restaurants have created the fully hot version that is more like a stir-fry rice bowl with egg and chili paste.

    If a fully hot version is more to your taste, when dining in an authentic Korean restaurant, like Kang Nam, stick to the dolsot.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #18 - May 18th, 2010, 2:32 pm
    Post #18 - May 18th, 2010, 2:32 pm Post #18 - May 18th, 2010, 2:32 pm
    eatchicago wrote:My understanding is that cold (or room-temp), seasoned vegetables (namul) atop standard bi bim bap is authentic and normal, as far as my understanding--although I'm not a Korean expert and I could be wrong, but this is my understanding from many years of eating it.

    Bi bim bap is, at its heart, warm rice with namul/banchan, egg, chili paste, and maybe meat.

    I believe that more americanized Korean and pan-Asian restaurants have created the fully hot version that is more like a stir-fry rice bowl with egg and chili paste.

    If a fully hot version is more to your taste, when dining in an authentic Korean restaurant, like Kang Nam, stick to the dolsot.

    Best,
    Michael


    Michael, I'm no expert but that's been the case in my experience as well. It's a dish that one can easily throw together with the stock of banchan that a typical Korean household would have in their fridge. You add a little leftover meat, a fried egg to rice that is always on hand, to create a quick and hearty meal.

    The Americanized Korean & pan-Asian places typically don't need to have a stash of banchan, so they probably will quickly saute some veggies to order, I imagine. Which works just fine, in my opinion. The key is the kochujang-based sauce. Without it, it's just not bibimbop.
  • Post #19 - May 18th, 2010, 2:33 pm
    Post #19 - May 18th, 2010, 2:33 pm Post #19 - May 18th, 2010, 2:33 pm
    I believe that the traditional version of bibim bap, the one that I love, I crave & enjoy weekly at Korean Restaurant in Morton Grove, consists of first & foremost a metal bowl. Add shredded green leaf lettuce, bean mung sprouts, shredded carrot & shredded pickled daikon in separate places, along the bottom of the bowl. Then add a small amount--no more than two ounces--of marinated, cooked bulgogi-style beef. Atop the whole shebang, then, will be a barely-set sunny-side-up egg. Hot meets cold. Just beautiful stuff.

    With the multiple small bowls of panchan served on the side is a tiny bowl of red ketchup-like chili sauce. I usually mix everything with the chopsticks, then spoon a liberal amount of the chili sauce in, mixing it again.

    I regularly lunch with a Japanese-American friend of mine, and he never fails to mention how the steaming bowl of white rice served on the side of this feast is always perfectly cooked, just enough stickiness yet the kernels are separate. And we've grown to love their steaming "corn tea", served in water glasses.

    Can you tell I really dig this place?!

    Korean Restaurant
    5707 W. Dempster St.
    Morton Grove, IL
  • Post #20 - May 18th, 2010, 2:46 pm
    Post #20 - May 18th, 2010, 2:46 pm Post #20 - May 18th, 2010, 2:46 pm
    jnm123 wrote:Can you tell I really dig this place?!

    Korean Restaurant
    5707 W. Dempster St.
    Morton Grove, IL
    Also known as Chun Ju Restaurant. I like their Bibim Bop as well, good call.

    Chun Ju/Korean Restaurant Bibim Bop

    Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #21 - May 18th, 2010, 4:48 pm
    Post #21 - May 18th, 2010, 4:48 pm Post #21 - May 18th, 2010, 4:48 pm
    Chun Ju/Korean Restaurant also offers a terrific version of DOL SOHT Bi Bim Bop, served in a stone bowl that has been heated enough to continue cooking the rice until it ends up crunchy and stuck to the bowl. This makes for a great end-of-the-meal treat, when you scrape off the rice and its crunchy texture and toasted taste add a bonus to whatever scraps you have left. Also, the egg in this version is added raw and it cooks in the hot bowl after you break it up and stir it in.

    Their panchan is generous and varied. It makes for a variety of tastes as you add a little to each bite from the bowl.

    The Fried Mandoo is a very good taste-tease for whiling away the wait for your BBB.
  • Post #22 - May 19th, 2010, 7:37 am
    Post #22 - May 19th, 2010, 7:37 am Post #22 - May 19th, 2010, 7:37 am
    jimwdavis wrote:Chun Ju/Korean Restaurant also offers a terrific version of DOL SOHT Bi Bim Bop, served in a stone bowl that has been heated enough to continue cooking the rice until it ends up crunchy and stuck to the bowl.
    Nice call, I had Chun Ju's dol sot bibim bop last night and found it damn tasty. In particular the crunchy toasted rice at the bottom of the dolsot. Chun Ju's version comes with a raw egg and it always surprises me the egg is not instantly cooked in volcanic heat of the dolsot. I swear the rice stayed tongue blisteringly hot for 25-minutes.

    Chun Ju has a nice selection of panchan including a crunchy bright flavored cucumber kimchee.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - May 19th, 2010, 7:48 am
    Post #23 - May 19th, 2010, 7:48 am Post #23 - May 19th, 2010, 7:48 am
    kenji wrote:
    CM2772 wrote:I like the dolsot bibimbap from the food court at Super H Mart in Niles. .


    I will second the above!



    I'll third it, though I do wish they had more panchan to go with it.

    So, the eternal question: any place within striking distance of downtown to get dolsot bibimbap for lunch? I get around via bicycle and I don't have a real strict schedule so I could probably ride way up north if the mood ever struck and could not be denied, but having a nearer option would be great if it exists.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #24 - May 19th, 2010, 7:50 am
    Post #24 - May 19th, 2010, 7:50 am Post #24 - May 19th, 2010, 7:50 am
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:So, the eternal question: any place within striking distance of downtown to get dolsot bibimbap for lunch? I get around via bicycle and I don't have a real strict schedule so I could probably ride way up north if the mood ever struck and could not be denied, but having a nearer option would be great if it exists.


    Call Korean Seoul Food on Van Buren. It's not on their regular menu, but they might be able to make it.

    Korean Seoul Food
    560 W Van Buren St.
    (312) 427-4293
    http://korean-seoulfood.com/
  • Post #25 - May 19th, 2010, 7:55 am
    Post #25 - May 19th, 2010, 7:55 am Post #25 - May 19th, 2010, 7:55 am
    eatchicago wrote:
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:So, the eternal question: any place within striking distance of downtown to get dolsot bibimbap for lunch? I get around via bicycle and I don't have a real strict schedule so I could probably ride way up north if the mood ever struck and could not be denied, but having a nearer option would be great if it exists.


    Call Korean Seoul Food on Van Buren. It's not on their regular menu, but they might be able to make it.

    Korean Seoul Food
    560 W Van Buren St.
    (312) 427-4293
    http://korean-seoulfood.com/


    They do have Bi Bim Bop, and they also have dolsots in which some of the soups are served, so that is a distinct possibility.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #26 - May 19th, 2010, 8:05 am
    Post #26 - May 19th, 2010, 8:05 am Post #26 - May 19th, 2010, 8:05 am
    Thanks guys, I'll give that a shot! :)
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #27 - May 19th, 2010, 9:22 am
    Post #27 - May 19th, 2010, 9:22 am Post #27 - May 19th, 2010, 9:22 am
    Cho Jung makes a pretty tasty version. That, coupled with the fact that I would pay whatever the cost of the meal was just to eat their panchan puts this high in my list. The pajun is also exceptional.

    Cho Jung
    952 North Harlem Avenue
    Glenview, IL 60025-4275
    (847) 724-1111
  • Post #28 - May 19th, 2010, 10:22 am
    Post #28 - May 19th, 2010, 10:22 am Post #28 - May 19th, 2010, 10:22 am
    deesher wrote:Cho Jung makes a pretty tasty version. That, coupled with the fact that I would pay whatever the cost of the meal was just to eat their panchan puts this high in my list. The pajun is also exceptional.

    I agree. A very nice version, indeed . . .

    Image
    Dolsot Bibimbap at Cho Jung

    and I agree wholeheartedly about the panchan, too.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #29 - May 19th, 2010, 10:38 am
    Post #29 - May 19th, 2010, 10:38 am Post #29 - May 19th, 2010, 10:38 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    deesher wrote:Cho Jung makes a pretty tasty version. That, coupled with the fact that I would pay whatever the cost of the meal was just to eat their panchan puts this high in my list. The pajun is also exceptional.

    I agree. A very nice version, indeed . . .

    Image
    Dolsot Bibimbap at Cho Jung

    and I agree wholeheartedly about the panchan, too.

    =R=

    Thirded. Their gulbap is also good and would be truly excellent with better oysters.
  • Post #30 - May 20th, 2010, 9:14 am
    Post #30 - May 20th, 2010, 9:14 am Post #30 - May 20th, 2010, 9:14 am
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:So, the eternal question: any place within striking distance of downtown to get dolsot bibimbap for lunch? I get around via bicycle and I don't have a real strict schedule so I could probably ride way up north if the mood ever struck and could not be denied, but having a nearer option would be great if it exists.

    The so-called "Delmonico's" in the pedway by Illinois Center (Lake/Michigan) has bibimbop, both the regular and dolsot. Quite good actually, and very reasonable.

    http://yfrog.com/3uivesj

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