LTH Home

Ketchup World [Attention Hammond]

Ketchup World [Attention Hammond]
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • Ketchup World [Attention Hammond]

    Post #1 - November 13th, 2005, 9:47 am
    Post #1 - November 13th, 2005, 9:47 am Post #1 - November 13th, 2005, 9:47 am
    Ketchup from around the world.

    Ketchup World
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - November 13th, 2005, 12:53 pm
    Post #2 - November 13th, 2005, 12:53 pm Post #2 - November 13th, 2005, 12:53 pm
    Wow, Gary, what a find! Thanks.

    Although it is hard to eat other catsup now that I've sampled Melissa Graham's world-class rendition of the world's favorite condiment, I've put this site on my favorites (Xmas is coming).

    Hammond
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #3 - November 15th, 2005, 12:02 pm
    Post #3 - November 15th, 2005, 12:02 pm Post #3 - November 15th, 2005, 12:02 pm
    Wow... I thought I was the only Ketchup nut... I drive to Canada a few times a year... One of the side trips i must always take is a trip to Costco to stock up on big bottles of Heinz Canadian ketchup. They use a different formula there (tomata paste instead of concentrate, 'liquid sugar' whatever that is)... It tastes better to me....

    Too bad its a web site and not a store... I think i've actually came across this site before but found their shipping to be outrageous ($8 shipping for a bottle of ketchup!) They also have "Brooks" ketchup, which was originally made about 10 miles from where I grew up (Collinsville IL), but now has gone to the Canuck's...


    I've also had the Lay's Ketchup flavored potato chips they have over there... they're pretty good... a lot like BBQ chips except no spice.
  • Post #4 - November 15th, 2005, 12:56 pm
    Post #4 - November 15th, 2005, 12:56 pm Post #4 - November 15th, 2005, 12:56 pm
    The dominant flavor of ketchup chips to me always seems to be sweet. Followed by salt. Not particularly pleasant to me, but the canadian in the family seems to sometimes enjoy them.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #5 - November 15th, 2005, 1:13 pm
    Post #5 - November 15th, 2005, 1:13 pm Post #5 - November 15th, 2005, 1:13 pm
    I grew up (Collinsville IL),

    Home of the World's Largest Catsup Bottle:
    http://www.catsupbottle.com/
  • Post #6 - November 15th, 2005, 1:43 pm
    Post #6 - November 15th, 2005, 1:43 pm Post #6 - November 15th, 2005, 1:43 pm
    nice posting. although, ketchup (catsup) is an american and english icon, i find it interesting that ketchup is used internationally. i use ketchup to make chinese fried rice, give pad thai its signature orange color and give the tomatoey-taste in chinese oxtail soup.
  • Post #7 - November 15th, 2005, 1:46 pm
    Post #7 - November 15th, 2005, 1:46 pm Post #7 - November 15th, 2005, 1:46 pm
    There was a program on public television last night about ketchup.

    From the WTTW website...

    Ketchup: King of Condiments
    This light-hearted history of ketchup delves into little-known facts about the condiment's origins, development and interesting uses. For years, Americans have dolloped this simple mix of tomato paste, vinegar, corn syrup and salt on everything from hot dogs to scrambled eggs, pasta and even ice-cream. KETCHUP: KING OF CONDIMENTS features a quirky cast of characters, including an avid ketchup bottle collector from Detroit; a trip to the World's Largest Catsup Bottle in Illinois, and an insider's tour of the H.J. Heinz Co. plant in Ohio. Along the way, author and food historian Andrew F. Smith chronicles the history of tomatoes and this American staple.


    A tour of the main H.J. Heinz Co. processing plant in Ohio revealed two things which made me recoil in horror:

    1. This plant generates the equivalent of 4 million standard-sized bottles of ketchup per day.

    2. This same plant generates appoximately 2 billion squeeze packets of ketchup per year.

    As if that were not enough, I was rudely informed that Americans consume 4+ standard-sized bottles of ketchup per person per year.

    E.M.
  • Post #8 - November 15th, 2005, 1:47 pm
    Post #8 - November 15th, 2005, 1:47 pm Post #8 - November 15th, 2005, 1:47 pm
    Erik M. wrote:As if that were not enough, it was estimated that Americans consume 4+ standard-sized bottles of ketchup per person per year.


    Wow. I guess Hammond is having my share. I don't think I eat that much in a decade.
  • Post #9 - November 15th, 2005, 1:56 pm
    Post #9 - November 15th, 2005, 1:56 pm Post #9 - November 15th, 2005, 1:56 pm
    dddane wrote: They also have "Brooks" ketchup, which was originally made about 10 miles from where I grew up (Collinsville IL), but now has gone to the Canuck's...


    Brooks is still pretty widely available. They stock it at Lincolnwood Produce.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #10 - November 15th, 2005, 7:23 pm
    Post #10 - November 15th, 2005, 7:23 pm Post #10 - November 15th, 2005, 7:23 pm
    eatchicago wrote:
    Erik M. wrote:As if that were not enough, it was estimated that Americans consume 4+ standard-sized bottles of ketchup per person per year.


    Wow. I guess Hammond is having my share. I don't think I eat that much in a decade.


    EC,

    I'm certain I'm having more than my share, but I'd guess this figure probably takes into account an untold amount of catsup that is mixed into other food items (at places as diverse as Chinese, French and Mexican), probably without your even knowing it...that is, all you would know is that the food tastes GREAT! :wink:

    Hammond
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #11 - November 15th, 2005, 8:26 pm
    Post #11 - November 15th, 2005, 8:26 pm Post #11 - November 15th, 2005, 8:26 pm
    Wow, found a restaurant with the help of this thread that no one has been to (or at least reviewed.)

    Hubbard Street Grill

    Chef David Schy's place which is also the birth place of Ketchupeno' hot ketchup (I already contacted the link posted above to tell him he's full of beans by mentioning South Carolina for Ketchupeno and not Chicago)

    I have not been here in years, although the ketchupeno sauce is bought weekly at Bobaks grocery
    Bill-Plainfield
  • Post #12 - November 15th, 2005, 9:11 pm
    Post #12 - November 15th, 2005, 9:11 pm Post #12 - November 15th, 2005, 9:11 pm
    Except for fries and attempting to save overcooked burgers, I don't use much ketchup anymore. But when I do use it on fries, I use a lot.

    Other places where ketchup enters my supply stream:
    Cocktail sauce: no tartar for me, any fried fish (other than tempura) gets a heavy dose of about 3 parts ketchup to 2 parts horseradish with a dash of worchestershire and a bunch of tabasco, maybe a little lemon.

    Brisket and pot roast - key element of the braising liquid

    I've never used it in Chinese (unless you count sriracha), but a splash in pad thai sounds like a nice alternative to tamarind.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #13 - November 16th, 2005, 12:23 pm
    Post #13 - November 16th, 2005, 12:23 pm Post #13 - November 16th, 2005, 12:23 pm
    Joel F, i use ketchup/vinegar instead of tamarind paste. you get the signature ORANGE color and same taste. Sriracha, which i refer to as the asian Ketchup, is great on anything... eggs, fried rice, HOT DOGS seriously.

    Ketchupeno? i don't think we have that out here in Los Angeles. i just add tabasco to ketchup and use it for dipping fries.
  • Post #14 - November 21st, 2005, 12:17 pm
    Post #14 - November 21st, 2005, 12:17 pm Post #14 - November 21st, 2005, 12:17 pm
    stevez wrote:
    dddane wrote: They also have "Brooks" ketchup, which was originally made about 10 miles from where I grew up (Collinsville IL), but now has gone to the Canuck's...


    Brooks is still pretty widely available. They stock it at Lincolnwood Produce.


    I found it within the last year or two, too... it doesn't seem like its the same receipe it used to be (when it was made in Collinsville IL...)... Not as tangy? It used to be in a glass bottle too, then again so was everything else....
  • Post #15 - November 21st, 2005, 1:20 pm
    Post #15 - November 21st, 2005, 1:20 pm Post #15 - November 21st, 2005, 1:20 pm
    Willkat98 wrote:Wow, found a restaurant with the help of this thread that no one has been to (or at least reviewed.)

    Hubbard Street Grill

    Chef David Schy's place which is also the birth place of Ketchupeno' hot ketchup (I already contacted the link posted above to tell him he's full of beans by mentioning South Carolina for Ketchupeno and not Chicago)

    I have not been here in years, although the ketchupeno sauce is bought weekly at Bobaks grocery


    Isn't this place closed?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #16 - November 21st, 2005, 1:53 pm
    Post #16 - November 21st, 2005, 1:53 pm Post #16 - November 21st, 2005, 1:53 pm
    Yeah, closed for many years now. Currently, the space is Rhumba (not the Brazilian in Boystown, one of the great losses, but the mediocre pan-latino where people dance).
  • Post #17 - September 5th, 2006, 12:41 pm
    Post #17 - September 5th, 2006, 12:41 pm Post #17 - September 5th, 2006, 12:41 pm
    Hammond,

    For the rare occasion your pockets aren't stuffed with Grant and Franklin.

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - September 5th, 2006, 3:59 pm
    Post #18 - September 5th, 2006, 3:59 pm Post #18 - September 5th, 2006, 3:59 pm
    Thanks for bumping this up to the top. I've been sitting on this picture for a while. I found this on a visit to South Carolina. It was served on the table next to the "traditional" Melinda's Hot Sauce. Happy Labor Day, Hammond.

    Melinda's Habanero Ketchup
    Image
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #19 - September 5th, 2006, 4:03 pm
    Post #19 - September 5th, 2006, 4:03 pm Post #19 - September 5th, 2006, 4:03 pm
    stevez wrote:Thanks for bumping this up to the top. I've been sitting on this picture for a while. I found this on a visit to South Carolina. It was served on the table next to the "traditional" Melinda's Hot Sauce. Happy Labor Day, Hammond.

    Melinda's Habanero Ketchup
    Image


    Thanks, SteveZ, but I must say, Melinda isn't exactly the kind of gal I'd describe as "Bold and Spicy." "Neat and Tidy," perhaps. "Prim and Proper." "Bathed and Attentive." Sure. But "Bold and Spicy?"
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #20 - September 5th, 2006, 4:08 pm
    Post #20 - September 5th, 2006, 4:08 pm Post #20 - September 5th, 2006, 4:08 pm
    David Hammond wrote:Thanks, SteveZ, but I must say, Melinda isn't exactly the kind of gal I'd describe as "Bold and Spicy." "Neat and Tidy," perhaps. "Prim and Proper." "Bathed and Attentive." Sure. But "Bold and Spicy?"


    I can tell you've never had her alone with a bottle of tequila. :twisted:
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #21 - September 5th, 2006, 4:26 pm
    Post #21 - September 5th, 2006, 4:26 pm Post #21 - September 5th, 2006, 4:26 pm
    I always found Melinda to be very saucy and a little tart. :roll:
  • Post #22 - September 5th, 2006, 8:18 pm
    Post #22 - September 5th, 2006, 8:18 pm Post #22 - September 5th, 2006, 8:18 pm
    From John T. Edge's new book, Hamburgers & Fries:

    The greatest fans of ketchup are people who have been to boarding school or jail or both.*


    In the same passage, Edge says that he himself has little use for ketchup, finding it overly sweet.

    But, he admits that he often enjoys mustard and/or mayonnaise on his hamburgers.


    Yet another kindred soul. :wink:

    E.M.

    * Source: Joe Allen, owner/proprietor of the eponymously named restaurant in Paris, France.
  • Post #23 - September 6th, 2006, 9:37 am
    Post #23 - September 6th, 2006, 9:37 am Post #23 - September 6th, 2006, 9:37 am
    Jeffrey Steingarten did a ketchup taste-off in 'The Man Who Ate Everything'. It's very entertaining and informative but it's dated. Heinz came out on top. I bought a handmade ketchup from Trotters To Go a couple of years ago that was delicious. Unfortunately, I can't remember the name--it came in a large jar, not a squeeze bottle.
  • Post #24 - October 18th, 2007, 7:08 pm
    Post #24 - October 18th, 2007, 7:08 pm Post #24 - October 18th, 2007, 7:08 pm
    so i'm in detroit for the week and stopped by a hippy food store ("Good Food Co.") in Troy MI to pick up a jar of the VERY delicious and spicy McClure's pickles (which as of recently you can buy on their web site--though shipping is $10. the pickles are $9 in the store though... so same there).

    Anyway, I happened to notice a product I had never seen before: Heinz Organic Ketchup... the ingredient list reads something like organic tomatoes, organic vinegar, organic sugar, ... organic sugar is really the only thing that gets me excited (vs hfcs) and i'll have to look for it in chicago. i just googled and it seems like it came out in 2002...not sure why i haven't seen it much...

    Image
  • Post #25 - October 19th, 2007, 8:48 am
    Post #25 - October 19th, 2007, 8:48 am Post #25 - October 19th, 2007, 8:48 am
    I've picked it up at my local Jewel-(Roscoe and Western)-seems to have a deeper flavor than the regular stuff...
    I love animals...they're delicious!
  • Post #26 - October 20th, 2007, 8:35 am
    Post #26 - October 20th, 2007, 8:35 am Post #26 - October 20th, 2007, 8:35 am
    Felt like something down-home the other day, so I made turkey meatloaf with the ubiquitous ketchup topping. Ketchup is something I usually keep on hand but don't really use regularly, so I'm not faithful to any brand.

    This time, however, after about an hour in the oven the ketchup topping developed into a deep red color and and had a deep and concentrated flavor that I've never experienced. Going back into the refrigerator - what kind of ketchup? It was Trader Joe's brand organic ketchup - but the short ingredient list noted sugar to be the second ingredient -- hence the carmelizing. The lack of high fructose corn syrup in "regular" ketchup (something you wouldn't find in an organic brand) gave it a less sweet, fakey taste.

    I probably still won't stay loyal to any particular brand except that I will continue to buy organic as that naturally (hah!) eliminates any fake stuff which clouds the taste.
  • Post #27 - July 15th, 2009, 9:21 am
    Post #27 - July 15th, 2009, 9:21 am Post #27 - July 15th, 2009, 9:21 am
    Since moving here 15 years ago, I have had many a Chicago dog and many times I have wondered...why no ketchup? I have not used said ketchup on my Chicago dog, mainly for fear of being mobbed by fellow LTHer's.
    If you do use ketchup, explain why. Now is your time to come out of the closet.
    If you don't, why not?
    Do you use ketchup on an "ordinary" Oscar Meyer hot dog?
    What about brats or Italian sausage?
    What else do you or don't you use ketchup on?
    Do you drown your fries or apply a dainty dab on each one?
    Inquiring minds(like mine) want to know.
  • Post #28 - July 15th, 2009, 11:18 am
    Post #28 - July 15th, 2009, 11:18 am Post #28 - July 15th, 2009, 11:18 am
    I have bought Brooks Ketchup in local stores but it just doesn't taste like the original Tangy Ketchup that I remember from years ago. I wonder if this product from Ketchup World actually tastes like the original which had a certain something different from the usual ketchup. It added a spice that gave it a unique taste (allspice?)
  • Post #29 - December 12th, 2009, 11:51 pm
    Post #29 - December 12th, 2009, 11:51 pm Post #29 - December 12th, 2009, 11:51 pm
    Dirty Harry hates ketchup

    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #30 - December 13th, 2009, 8:33 pm
    Post #30 - December 13th, 2009, 8:33 pm Post #30 - December 13th, 2009, 8:33 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Dirty Harry hates ketchup


    That's amazing. Maybe we should invite him to join LTHforum. :)
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more