LTH Home

Foodie Fatigue: A Plea for Calm, in the Trib

Foodie Fatigue: A Plea for Calm, in the Trib
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Foodie Fatigue: A Plea for Calm, in the Trib

    Post #1 - December 26th, 2010, 9:34 pm
    Post #1 - December 26th, 2010, 9:34 pm Post #1 - December 26th, 2010, 9:34 pm
    Foodie fatigue

    The article quotes several of us, including G Wiv, and refers to LTH as "an online porch light for the most fervent of local foodie moths".
  • Post #2 - December 26th, 2010, 10:15 pm
    Post #2 - December 26th, 2010, 10:15 pm Post #2 - December 26th, 2010, 10:15 pm
    nsxtasy wrote:"an online porch light for the most fervent of local foodie moths"


    In girum imus nocte, et consumimur igni.
  • Post #3 - December 26th, 2010, 10:17 pm
    Post #3 - December 26th, 2010, 10:17 pm Post #3 - December 26th, 2010, 10:17 pm
    "Foodies" are indeed tiresome, I think they always have been.

    People who appreciate good food, at all levels, and seek to spread the word will always be valued.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #4 - December 26th, 2010, 11:36 pm
    Post #4 - December 26th, 2010, 11:36 pm Post #4 - December 26th, 2010, 11:36 pm
    Every so often we get a column like this in which a person who makes his or her living writing about food contends that enthusiasm for food (among non-professionals) is out of control, needs to be calmed or whatever. At least in this case Borrelli concedes that being a part-time food writer, he's part of the "problem." But still, he's essentially poking the eyes that read him, as it were. I imagine he's also grateful for the fact that so many "foodies" read the Trib's food section and blog, where many of his pieces appear. I don't think it's the casual readers who read such outlets -- especially the blogs -- but I could be wrong about that.

    The bottom line is that people who continually obsess about anything are tiresome, whether it be food, fantasy football, training dogs or scrapbooking. To me, though, what's even worse is people who'll eat or drink anything with nary a care about its quality, provenance or actual cost to society. These are the people who've ultimately given the wholesome, quality food that should be commonplace its premium value.

    On balance I'd say that the recent mega-popularity of food is a good thing and that it's brought a lot of benefits to all of us that extend far beyond the culinary aspects. In his piece, Borrelli describes a reactionary customer who stormed out of Black Dog Gelato because they use corn syrup (among other sweetners). Ok, there's one misguided individual but I think that's the exception, not the rule and I'm confident that we're all better off due to this heightened awareness of food, even if not everyone who cares gets it right every single time.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #5 - December 26th, 2010, 11:52 pm
    Post #5 - December 26th, 2010, 11:52 pm Post #5 - December 26th, 2010, 11:52 pm
    The bottom line is that people who continually obsess about anything are tiresome, whether it be food, fantasy football, training dogs or scrapbooking. To me, though, what's even worse is people who'll eat or drink anything with nary a care about its quality, provenance or actual cost to society. These are the people who've ultimately given the wholesome, quality food that should be commonplace its premium value.


    Verdad.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #6 - December 27th, 2010, 11:28 pm
    Post #6 - December 27th, 2010, 11:28 pm Post #6 - December 27th, 2010, 11:28 pm
    I think the food writers feel this way because one of the results of this phenomenon is that there are dozens of blogs which consistently put out more interesting, better researched, better written articles than the pap that passes for copy in the food sections of the newspapers.
  • Post #7 - December 28th, 2010, 11:14 am
    Post #7 - December 28th, 2010, 11:14 am Post #7 - December 28th, 2010, 11:14 am
    elakin wrote:I think the food writers feel this way because one of the results of this phenomenon is that there are dozens of blogs which consistently put out more interesting, better researched, better written articles than the pap that passes for copy in the food sections of the newspapers.


    Boo-yah!
  • Post #8 - December 28th, 2010, 11:56 am
    Post #8 - December 28th, 2010, 11:56 am Post #8 - December 28th, 2010, 11:56 am
    It's actually a pretty thoughtful article.
  • Post #9 - December 28th, 2010, 12:16 pm
    Post #9 - December 28th, 2010, 12:16 pm Post #9 - December 28th, 2010, 12:16 pm
    The column space for "legitimate" food journalism is vastly larger than it was a few years ago thanks to sites like this, self-contemplative blogs from oddballs who photograph food, and, like it or not, food TV. I don't blame journalists for covering all the angles, including the predictable backlash. I do sort of blame the tweetering celebrity chefs -- particularly those whose fame flows directly from reality TV, those who supposedly just want to do their thing and be left alone like so many Hiltons and Kardashians.
  • Post #10 - December 28th, 2010, 1:01 pm
    Post #10 - December 28th, 2010, 1:01 pm Post #10 - December 28th, 2010, 1:01 pm
    I have article-about-this-subject-matter fatigue.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #11 - December 28th, 2010, 1:10 pm
    Post #11 - December 28th, 2010, 1:10 pm Post #11 - December 28th, 2010, 1:10 pm
    Kennyz wrote:I have article-about-this-subject-matter fatigue.


    Agreed.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #12 - December 28th, 2010, 6:22 pm
    Post #12 - December 28th, 2010, 6:22 pm Post #12 - December 28th, 2010, 6:22 pm
    Kennyz wrote:I have article-about-this-subject-matter fatigue.



    No sh*t. How hard would it be to write something interesting about food? Buy an MFK Fisher book and get a clue.
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #13 - December 28th, 2010, 10:06 pm
    Post #13 - December 28th, 2010, 10:06 pm Post #13 - December 28th, 2010, 10:06 pm
    Perhaps this is sour grapes but frankly, those who don't like food confound me. I mean...if you don't enjoy the act of eating and tasting and smelling things that make you feel good and appreciate those who created it, then what could you enjoy? I find those who don't enjoy eating sort of like Scrooges. Bah Humbugers all.

    And when they meet or are exposed to those who do love to eat -- the bah humbugers reach out to put coal in their culinary stockings by accusing "foodies" of excess and gluttony, and I suppose in this case, of irritation.

    But probably -- they don't understand us any more than we understand them.

    All I know is that i get cupcakes and they, apparently, don't. Who wins? :P
  • Post #14 - December 29th, 2010, 10:47 pm
    Post #14 - December 29th, 2010, 10:47 pm Post #14 - December 29th, 2010, 10:47 pm
    At least two of the article's details came straight from Time.com, so now we know Christopher Borelli reads Time magazine, which is to say now we know someone is still reading Time magazine.

    It occurs to me that such articles are win-win for the writer. The objects of derision will read and discuss and will not swear off reading that writer, while those who did not feel part of the trend's tribe will feel some kinship with the writer and might read him more.

    It's also not only the world of food by any means that sees periodic impassioned pleas by representatives of print journalism and other traditional media for a backoff by the nontraditional (i.e., online) contributors to the discussion.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #15 - December 30th, 2010, 8:04 pm
    Post #15 - December 30th, 2010, 8:04 pm Post #15 - December 30th, 2010, 8:04 pm
    Katie wrote:At least two of the article's details came straight from Time.com, so now we know Christopher Borelli reads Time magazine, which is to say now we know someone is still reading Time magazine.

    Pretty sure Time is now putting out a version for adults. See story/video here.
  • Post #16 - January 1st, 2011, 3:06 pm
    Post #16 - January 1st, 2011, 3:06 pm Post #16 - January 1st, 2011, 3:06 pm
    Internet has enabled everyone to become an expert and than a critic, regarding anything, it is a win win situation for the writer, as always, whether in printed media or in a foodie blog because ultimately we all get to write about ourselves under the disguise of being a critic.
    Actually we have fallen into this trap ourselves where we believe our opinion actually matters or for that matter anybodies opinion matters. The result is a frenzy of opinions about anything food related, restaurants and all, including corn syrup, the toxic sugar, it is just sugar, and it has been around for a long time.
    I thought Al Gore invented the internet, then I was told porn invented the internet, now I am starting to think foodies invented the internet.
    I stick to when asked, where was the best hamburger I ever had, I respond, the last one I had, that is when I was most ready to eat, I was hungry.
  • Post #17 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:21 am
    Post #17 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:21 am Post #17 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:21 am
    I agree with Ronnie that people with one-track minds are dull no matter what the subject they doggedly pursue. However, I don't see what's so wrong with obsessively discussing food while at dinner. What do you think strip club patrons are talking about?

    Conversation is heavily influenced by context and location, after all.
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #18 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:41 am
    Post #18 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:41 am Post #18 - January 2nd, 2011, 8:41 am
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:I don't see what's so wrong with obsessively discussing food while at dinner. What do you think strip club patrons are talking about?

    Conversation is heavily influenced by context and location, after all.

    This makes me chuckle appreciatively. It drives my wife crazy that every time my family gets together at a restaurant for lunch, the conversation is about where we're going for dinner.
  • Post #19 - January 3rd, 2011, 1:57 pm
    Post #19 - January 3rd, 2011, 1:57 pm Post #19 - January 3rd, 2011, 1:57 pm
    earthlydesire wrote:Perhaps this is sour grapes but frankly, those who don't like food confound me. I mean...if you don't enjoy the act of eating and tasting and smelling things that make you feel good and appreciate those who created it, then what could you enjoy? I find those who don't enjoy eating sort of like Scrooges. Bah Humbugers all.

    And when they meet or are exposed to those who do love to eat -- the bah humbugers reach out to put coal in their culinary stockings by accusing "foodies" of excess and gluttony, and I suppose in this case, of irritation.

    But probably -- they don't understand us any more than we understand them.

    All I know is that i get cupcakes and they, apparently, don't. Who wins? :P


    Interesting way of looking at it. I tend to agree with you.

    It makes me think back to my (much) younger days when I was in school. Coming from a home with a mother who was a teriffic cook, and working in various restaurants as I made my way thru high school and college, it always surprised me when people would rave about the cafeteria's food. As I would sit there trying to decide what was the least offensive food on the given menu, I would listen to others saying how good it was. It made me sit and wonder exactly what they were eating at home that made them think this food was good.

    Fast forward 30 years and my oldest child is home from his 1st semester at college. As he was eagerly eating whatever was placed in front of him I asked him how the food at school was. He laughed and made a very similar comment about how he doesn;t understand how some of his dorm mates can find the food "good" and what are they eating back at home?. He says many of them eat it because there are no others options (at least cost wise).

    I think it is possible that many people go thru life, for whatever reason, where food is there only as a means of survival. The pleasure that comes from eating, tasting, sharing, etc. is just not part of their make-up.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more