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Favorite cooking shows (lately)

Favorite cooking shows (lately)
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  • Post #211 - August 1st, 2022, 8:51 pm
    Post #211 - August 1st, 2022, 8:51 pm Post #211 - August 1st, 2022, 8:51 pm
    IMO, "The Bear" is a train wreck...too awful to look at but you keep sneaking peeks anyway.
    Sure, the star is eye candy for some...restaurant in transition, but no servers???....$6 Walmart can opener..?.so many other inaccurate details I have to wonder.
    Small pieces of bottom round lovingly braised in home size baking pans. Nobody informs the chef we're out of beef at shift's end? Scratch baked rolls in a small/ medium volume outlet? I have to wonder what planet the "technical advisors" are from???

    Veal bones used for gravy in a beef joint? BTW, a full 22 qt Cambro holds 44# liquid, so it's perched precariously on top of the shelving?

    Sorry, this show is make believe dreck.s
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #212 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am
    Post #212 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am Post #212 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am
    Evil Ronnie wrote:IMO, "The Bear" is a train wreck...too awful to look at but you keep sneaking peeks anyway.
    Sure, the star is eye candy for some...restaurant in transition, but no servers???....$6 Walmart can opener..?.so many other inaccurate details I have to wonder.
    Small pieces of bottom round lovingly braised in home size baking pans. Nobody informs the chef we're out of beef at shift's end? Scratch baked rolls in a small/ medium volume outlet? I have to wonder what planet the "technical advisors" are from???

    Veal bones used for gravy in a beef joint? BTW, a full 22 qt Cambro holds 44# liquid, so it's perched precariously on top of the shelving?

    Sorry, this show is make believe dreck.s

    lol, it's fiction so for most viewers the details you mention are completely irrelevant. They watch for the drama, narrative, humor, etc and don't care or even know about cambros or whatever.

    There were many restaurant people involved in the show's inception and production. Half the episodes were produced by Matty Matheson (also plays Fak), the former executive chef at Parts & Labour, which was a pretty popular place in Toronto (not another planet) that closed in 2019. He still runs a few places in the Toronto area and also has a youtube channel with over a million followers. so, he's hardly a newcomer or outsider when it come to restaurants or entertainment.

    making fictional content means making choices that balance reality with entertainment. Seems unlikely that 'satisfy bitter old chefs' was on the checklist. If u want bare bones reality, maybe a documentary is more your speed. :wink:
  • Post #213 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:36 am
    Post #213 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:36 am Post #213 - August 2nd, 2022, 11:36 am
    Best new TV show I've seen all year and I watch a lot of TV. Character development, dialogue, flashbacks all work for me as well as a killer musical score. The live Wilco song "Spiders (Kidsmoke)" being played in the background during the stressful 2nd to last episode (someone get me a sharpie that works!) was a masterclass.
  • Post #214 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:32 pm
    Post #214 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:32 pm Post #214 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:32 pm
    HonestMan wrote:Best new TV show I've seen all year and I watch a lot of TV. Character development, dialogue, flashbacks all work for me as well as a killer musical score. The live Wilco song "Spiders (Kidsmoke)" being played in the background during the stressful 2nd to last episode (someone get me a sharpie that works!) was a masterclass.

    In general, their music cues were all impeccable. They also used Wilco's Impossible Germany which has one of the most haunting guitar solos out there, Andrew Bird's Sisyphus, and a very cool demo version of Sufjan Steven's Chicago. All they needed was some Big Black.
    https://www.thetealmango.com/entertainm ... -the-show/
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #215 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:36 pm
    Post #215 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:36 pm Post #215 - August 2nd, 2022, 6:36 pm
    JoelF wrote:
    HonestMan wrote:Best new TV show I've seen all year and I watch a lot of TV. Character development, dialogue, flashbacks all work for me as well as a killer musical score. The live Wilco song "Spiders (Kidsmoke)" being played in the background during the stressful 2nd to last episode (someone get me a sharpie that works!) was a masterclass.

    In general, their music cues were all impeccable. They also used Wilco's Impossible Germany which has one of the most haunting guitar solos out there, Andrew Bird's Sisyphus, and a very cool demo version of Sufjan Steven's Chicago. All they needed was some Big Black.
    https://www.thetealmango.com/entertainm ... -the-show/

    Agreed on the music. Masterful and original choices that worked extremely well with the scenes in which they were used. That Impossible Germany sequence was especially on point.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #216 - August 4th, 2022, 9:09 pm
    Post #216 - August 4th, 2022, 9:09 pm Post #216 - August 4th, 2022, 9:09 pm
    munch wrote:
    Evil Ronnie wrote:IMO, "The Bear" is a train wreck...too awful to look at but you keep sneaking peeks anyway.
    Sure, the star is eye candy for some...restaurant in transition, but no servers???....$6 Walmart can opener..?.so many other inaccurate details I have to wonder.
    Small pieces of bottom round lovingly braised in home size baking pans. Nobody informs the chef we're out of beef at shift's end? Scratch baked rolls in a small/ medium volume outlet? I have to wonder what planet the "technical advisors" are from???

    Veal bones used for gravy in a beef joint? BTW, a full 22 qt Cambro holds 44# liquid, so it's perched precariously on top of the shelving?

    Sorry, this show is make believe dreck.s

    "lol, it's fiction so for most viewers the details you mention are completely irrelevant."

    I disagree with this statement. Not realistic! Who is bitter now? Completely irrelevant? Sez who?

    "They watch for the drama, narrative, humor, etc and don't care or even know about cambros or whatever."

    You mean like Lemmings?

    "There were many restaurant people involved in the show's inception and production. Half the episodes were produced by Matty Matheson (also plays Fak), the former executive chef at Parts & Labour, which was a pretty popular place in Toronto (not another planet) that closed in 2019. He still runs a few places in the Toronto area and also has a youtube channel with over a million followers. so, he's hardly a newcomer or outsider when it come to restaurants or entertainment."

    Should I be impressed? How many people exactly?

    ""making fictional content means making choices that balance reality with entertainment."

    Entertainment?

    "Seems unlikely that 'satisfy bitter old chefs' was on the checklist."

    Ouch! Who is bitter now?

    "If u want bare bones reality, maybe a documentary is more your speed. :wink:


    Rim shot...another zinger!!! Actually, I prefer good acting, casting, plot and and authenticity. More anger from the "expert."

    Sure, I'm bitter at times...but I refuse to be sucked into your weak tirade. Lose the kool aid! Yes, I'm 72...anything wrong with that? I enjoyed a 18 year career in 4&5 star hotels, followed by 22 years in the most exclusive private clubs in Chicago, Palm Beach and Dallas, which I'd do all over again if physically able to.
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #217 - August 5th, 2022, 9:07 am
    Post #217 - August 5th, 2022, 9:07 am Post #217 - August 5th, 2022, 9:07 am
    Evil Ronnie wrote:More anger from the "expert."

    omg, dude. You're the 'expert' lol. I'm just the one who took 2 minutes to look up some basic facts about the bear that you were too lazy to bother with before you posted your uninformed opinion. but why let the facts get in the way, right?
  • Post #218 - August 5th, 2022, 9:12 am
    Post #218 - August 5th, 2022, 9:12 am Post #218 - August 5th, 2022, 9:12 am
    AMF
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #219 - August 5th, 2022, 10:03 am
    Post #219 - August 5th, 2022, 10:03 am Post #219 - August 5th, 2022, 10:03 am
    Couple more favorable reviews of/takes on the 'The Bear' . . .

    @nytimes.com, Carina Chocano wrote:“The Bear” is compelling not because of how it recreates a kitchen but because it captures something about modern work in general.

    How ‘The Bear’ Captures the Panic of Modern Work

    Also . . .

    @newyorker.com, Helen Rosner wrote:The excellent new FX show “The Bear” takes place in a type of restaurant that only exists in Chicago. Not quite a diner, not quite a deli, not quite a fast-food joint, it is a storefront establishment with big plate-glass windows, grubby in a reassuring way, with illuminated signs that advertise Italian beef or gyros. The color scheme is brown and beige; the diverse, largely blue-collar clientele who line up for lunch every day are a glad-handing politician’s dream; the menus rarely stray from short-order classics and local specialties. I can summon in an instant the sense memory of stepping inside the doors of Johnnie’s Beef or Al’s on Taylor, and the newborn-like heft of a warm, paper-wrapped beef sandwich. (I get mine “sweet and hot, dipped”—both kinds of peppers, plus a full-sandwich dunk in the beefy broth in which the meat has braised for hours.) There’s a smell these restaurants share that’s found in no other place on earth: a layered, rough, masculine perfume of meat and garlic and fryer oil and Formica laminate and sweet, yeasty bread. It’s the aroma that would be pumped into a Smell-O-Vision showing of “The Bear,” which is about a decorated fine-dining chef who returns to Chicago to take over his family’s Italian-beef shop, and to try to save it from disaster.

    @newyorker.com, Helen Rosner wrote:“The Bear” has rightly been praised for its uncannily realistic depiction of restaurant life. Kitchen work has rarely been portrayed this convincingly onscreen. The creator of “The Bear,” Christopher Storer, is best known for his documentaries, including the 2013 film “Sense of Urgency,” about the illustrious chef Thomas Keller, and it’s clear that he knows how to capture the way restaurants really work. Little touches help the Beef’s back-of-house rhythms ring true: cooks drinking ice water out of quart containers, a general shortage of working Sharpies, the walk-in fridge used as a place of solitude and recovery, the back office cluttered with bottles of Fernet and Pepto-Bismol, Carmy’s insistence that the green painter’s tape used to label bins and containers always have sharp, scissor-cut edges, never raggedly torn ones. The show was shot in an actual Italian-beef restaurant in Chicago, so the space, and the way that people move around and against one another, feels genuinely functional and claustrophobic. There are a few false notes, by my judgment — can giardiniera, a pickled mix of vegetables, really be whipped up à la minute? Can an Italian-beef joint a few hundred grand in the hole really justify a full-time dedicated pastry cook?—but the over-all impression feels strikingly true to life.

    “The Bear” Is a Gritty Fairy Tale of Cooking and Grief

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #220 - August 5th, 2022, 10:33 am
    Post #220 - August 5th, 2022, 10:33 am Post #220 - August 5th, 2022, 10:33 am
    I'll just say that I loved "The Bear". The joy was in the acting, the characters, and storylines. I don't get hung up on compromises or departures from reality in the service of show.
  • Post #221 - August 5th, 2022, 12:13 pm
    Post #221 - August 5th, 2022, 12:13 pm Post #221 - August 5th, 2022, 12:13 pm
    Two things.

    One: I have not seen The Bear, I pay Xfinity a ridiculous amount of money every month and refuse to be held hostage for an additional premium channel just to see The Bear.

    Two: I am working in a restaurant as I type this. A restaurant is not a TV show and, conversely, a TV show is not a restaurant.

    Fiction. Fiction. Fiction. If one enjoys The Bear, god bless. I hope to see it one of these days.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #222 - August 5th, 2022, 12:31 pm
    Post #222 - August 5th, 2022, 12:31 pm Post #222 - August 5th, 2022, 12:31 pm
    Just a gentle reminder that this thread was about cooking shows until someone poked the bear. Hope we can get back to the original topic eventually.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #223 - August 5th, 2022, 12:49 pm
    Post #223 - August 5th, 2022, 12:49 pm Post #223 - August 5th, 2022, 12:49 pm
    There’s quite a bit of cooking in The Bear. Feel free to post about any thing else you’d like, of course.
  • Post #224 - August 5th, 2022, 12:51 pm
    Post #224 - August 5th, 2022, 12:51 pm Post #224 - August 5th, 2022, 12:51 pm
    Right now I'm watching Chris Kimball on Milk Street demonstrate an entire dish (bucatini w fresh cherry tomato sauce and fresh sage) done in a multicooker (Instant Pot). This is the first time I've seen a tv show demonstrate a recipe using an IP, something for which I think there must be high viewer demand. Have to give Milk Street credit for getting ahead of the curve on that.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #225 - August 5th, 2022, 1:06 pm
    Post #225 - August 5th, 2022, 1:06 pm Post #225 - August 5th, 2022, 1:06 pm
    I agree, Darren. I guess what I meant is that the thread previously addressed conventional instructional-type cooking shows (and a little reality TV cooking like A Chef's Life and travelogue like Somebody Feed Phil). Food-centric fictional movies and TV shows such as, say, Midnight Diner, and The Bear, are usually discussed in their own threads. NOT (nobody jump on me about this, please) that I'm trying to police what people post here or anywhere. It was, as I said, just a gentle reminder about what this thread was originally about.

    As an aside ... there's a saying about relationships that in arguments, you start out arguing about something, and pretty soon, you're arguing about how you're arguing. I also suggested hopefully in the original post that this thread might be a bash-free zone for information exchange about cooking shows. I look forward to a return to that too.

    NOT, as I'll say again, that I aspire to police what people post here or anywhere. Just saying I personally quietly hope for a return to some positivity and tips on good cooking shows.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #226 - August 6th, 2022, 9:46 pm
    Post #226 - August 6th, 2022, 9:46 pm Post #226 - August 6th, 2022, 9:46 pm
    Not a regular cooking show but rather a feature of another show -- What's Eating Dan is associated with America's Test Kitchen -- but it's a the kind of combination of food history, food science, and just plain good food that I always enjoy. Here's an episode he just did on tomatoes, as it's peak tomato season right now. Definitely inspiration to at least buy some tomatoes, and some fun ideas for cooking -- especially for folks who grow their own and have far too many. https://youtu.be/I0kr15DYHNU
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #227 - August 8th, 2022, 10:49 pm
    Post #227 - August 8th, 2022, 10:49 pm Post #227 - August 8th, 2022, 10:49 pm
    With apologies to Katie, I'm fascinated by the continuous flow of interesting, informed and informative writing that The Bear has inspired. I thought this guest opinion essay at nytimes.com, written by Saru Jayaraman -- a woman who's spent a few decades in and around the industry -- was particularly interesting . . . (Warning: possible spoilers)
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    at nytimes.com, Saru Jayaraman wrote:There’s so much in “The Bear” that’s relatable for anyone who has worked in restaurants: small details like the plastic quart tub that Carmy drinks water from; banter with co-workers on smoke breaks; comparing scars from accidents and burns. The show also accurately depicts the relentless pressure that drives some restaurant workers to addiction or injury; the screaming, harassment, toxic masculinity and overwork that they often endure for very little pay; and the pride in their work that brings them back day after day.

    After 20 years of organizing restaurant workers to demand higher wages and more equitable working conditions, I watched “The Bear” with some trepidation: It focuses on the struggles of the young white male chef, with only glimpses into the lives of the workers of color in the restaurant. Even so, I found the show to be a strikingly accurate depiction of the joys, challenges and inequities of restaurant life.

    Hulu’s ‘The Bear’ and the Restaurant Industry’s Long Overdue Reckoning

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #228 - Today, 11:04 am
    Post #228 - Today, 11:04 am Post #228 - Today, 11:04 am
    This The Bear tangent made me smile . . .

    Demand for Italian Beef Is Booming. Thank ‘The Bear.’

    at nytimes.com, Rachel Sherman wrote:Last month, Dan Michaels, an owner of Gino’s East of Chicago in Los Angeles, watched as orders for Italian beef — the classic Chicago sandwich of thinly sliced roast beef and tangy giardiniera piled on a roll — suddenly soared to 300 a day, from 150 a day in June.

    “The Bear” had struck again.

    The cross-talking, anxiety-inducing series from FX about a struggling Chicago beef sandwich shop and its harried kitchen brigade has drawn acclaim from food media and restaurant veterans, propelled a slew of “Yes, Chef!” memes gushing over the lead actor, Jeremy Allen White, and energized a collective lust for sweaty line cooks.

    The show has also spurred instant demand for the delectably sloppy Italian beef sandwiches at the center of the plot’s chaos. Search interest on Google, according to Google Trends, nearly doubled after the show was released on Hulu on June 23, and Chicago-style restaurants across the country are feeling the effects in person.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world

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