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Hot&Spicy Food...And Your Mouth

Hot&Spicy Food...And Your Mouth
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  • Hot&Spicy Food...And Your Mouth

    Post #1 - June 9th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    Post #1 - June 9th, 2021, 7:39 pm Post #1 - June 9th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    I'm kinda guessing that I'm not the only one this happens to...
    You eat a bunch of really spicy stuff. Then when your mouth is coated in capsaicin, or whatever makes stuff hot, you eat something warm, temperature warm, and the pain in your mouth increases? Is there a term for that? Does capsaicin make your pain receptors think you've burnt your mouthparts - kinda like when you burn your skin if you touch something warm it's tender?

    I ate a whole bunch of Chaparrita habanero salsa on some tacos, and took a small forkfull of warm, white rice, and my mouth kinda went up in flames. It's happened before a bunch of times, and got me thinking all sciencey like and stuff.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #2 - June 10th, 2021, 7:20 am
    Post #2 - June 10th, 2021, 7:20 am Post #2 - June 10th, 2021, 7:20 am
    The main thing is that capsaicin locks onto pain receptors -- specifically those for heat --and doesn't let go easily. So the pain will be cumulative

    Did you know that it only affects mammals? Chiles evolved to have birds eat the fruits and spread the seeds.
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  • Post #3 - June 10th, 2021, 4:18 pm
    Post #3 - June 10th, 2021, 4:18 pm Post #3 - June 10th, 2021, 4:18 pm
    This might be another part of your answer:

    "Capsaicin alters the sensitivity of the pain receptors in your mouth, effectively lowering the temperature at which you feel burning pain."

    From jumping horses to jalapeños: the science of spicy peppers
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #4 - June 10th, 2021, 4:45 pm
    Post #4 - June 10th, 2021, 4:45 pm Post #4 - June 10th, 2021, 4:45 pm
    In 2003, I had a bad case of shingles on my back. The recommendation from my doctor at that point was to dry my back and apply a capsasum cream.

    However, one morning, I was in a rush and applied the cream right after the shower. For two hours, I was in the most incredible pain as my back was burning It was the same way that I felt when digesting a 1/2 teaspoon of ghost pepper mustard.

    I would agree that it does seem to heat up your mouth as well as your sinuses.

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