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Restaurants in the era of social distancing

Restaurants in the era of social distancing
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  • Post #31 - March 22nd, 2020, 1:11 pm
    Post #31 - March 22nd, 2020, 1:11 pm Post #31 - March 22nd, 2020, 1:11 pm
    I work in the food industry in NYC. I am a cheese monger, having worked deli and specialty cheese for 13 years. I am done with my "training" period with Citarella and tomorrow transfer across town to the Eastside, from headquarters West. I must carry documentation commuting that I am an "essential worker." On the nonce I am fierce about being on the front lines. We order everyday which means we are one of the few stores fully stocked in the time of plague. And, our guests ask how we are handling things personally. I respond as best we do. We(as a city) are not doing well. Any cough, any sneeze, I clear my goddamn throat and people back away. Fuck this Corona shit. Love Chinese regional cuisines, cook these cuisines and this is the epicenter of every fucking flu. My next door neighbor in Indianapolis(I was out opening a new store, training a deli dept. in Westport, years ago, my friend got H1N1), they had to trache her and bring in the one rotating bed in the state to keep fluid from drowning her lungs. We visited her when it was safe and all we saw was her mouth as the bed slowly rotated. China is the epicenter, wtf?
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #32 - March 22nd, 2020, 2:12 pm
    Post #32 - March 22nd, 2020, 2:12 pm Post #32 - March 22nd, 2020, 2:12 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:I prefer not to use another website or load another app

    Thanks though...
    ....
    Late night snack...

    McDonald's
    111 W Madison St, Oak Park

    Used the app.
    Having a consistent position on shitty unnecessary food apps would at least mitigate the damage of the crisis profiteering conspiracy theory.
  • Post #33 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:01 pm
    Post #33 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:01 pm Post #33 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:01 pm
    nsxtasy wrote:The Tribune also has a searchable list of 500+ restaurants open for carryout and delivery:

    Searchable list of more than 500 Chicago-area restaurants open for delivery, curbside or pickup

    The number of restaurants on the Tribune list is now over 1000. (The link remains the same.)
  • Post #34 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:55 pm
    Post #34 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:55 pm Post #34 - March 22nd, 2020, 3:55 pm
    I have a habit of getting lots of takeout food and locally owned places nearly every day under normal circumstances. I live in a small town that isn't exactly under lock down, but that could change any day this week. Anyway, I will try to support my local spots until they get shut down because every single one of them is struggling right now.

    Over the years I've known some people who own or manage spots, and they always have a number in the back of their head of the amount of money they need to keep in the bank to ride out a down time. Like every winter things slow down and they anticipate it. Its like a person needing to keep some money saved in the bank, not everyone actually does it. But this is like a whole month of 11:00 AM on Tuesday in the middle of winter kind of slow business.
  • Post #35 - March 22nd, 2020, 9:03 pm
    Post #35 - March 22nd, 2020, 9:03 pm Post #35 - March 22nd, 2020, 9:03 pm
    Picked up from In-On Thai tonight. They set it up so they can hand you your food in the vestibule, with no entry to the main space. The food, as usual, was exceptional. Highly recommend getting the crispy chicken salad - it holds up well to go. Such nice people and amazing food, hope they can make it through all of this.
  • Post #36 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:43 am
    Post #36 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:43 am Post #36 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:43 am
    Curious if anyone has given Chowbus a try? It looks like they deliver long distance from some really good spots in Chinatown. Been hesitant to try it until now thinking that delivery would just take too long to get to where we live. Delivery person would certainly not be stuck in traffic now.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #37 - March 23rd, 2020, 9:42 am
    Post #37 - March 23rd, 2020, 9:42 am Post #37 - March 23rd, 2020, 9:42 am
    Interesting take on the potential role of restaurants and their trained staffs in the midst of the current crisis by Jose Andres in yesterday's NYT . . . (thanks for the heads up, Jazzfood)

    José Andrés: We Have a Food Crisis Unfolding Out of Sight

    at nytimes.com, Jose Andres wrote:Writing in the middle of two devastating cholera pandemics in the early 1800s, the great French culinary thinker Brillat-Savarin articulated a truth we urgently need to grasp today: “The destiny of nations depends on how they feed themselves.”

    The coronavirus pandemic threatens to create both a public health and economic catastrophe. But we cannot afford to ignore the humanitarian crisis that is unfolding out of sight.

    Our fate as a nation depends on how we feed our most vulnerable citizens through this crisis. If our leaders step up now with federal aid, food can be the solution — supporting millions of jobs while also feeding millions of people in desperate need.

    There is historical precedent for spending federal dollars to preserve jobs and serve the public: the Works Progress Administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. Over eight years, the W.P.A. put more than eight million Americans to work, building schools, hospitals and vital infrastructure. Today we need a W.P.A. to feed America. In honor of one of its food programs, I suggest calling this new emergency relief America Eats Now.

    We know this model works because we have proved the concept by feeding our fellow citizens through several recent disasters.

    When my nonprofit World Central Kitchen arrived in Puerto Rico after the devastation of Hurricane Maria, we faced the twin challenges of feeding an island when its economy had flatlined.

    We combined a private-sector mentality with federal dollars and private donations to pump cash through the food supply chain, putting people to work by feeding those in the greatest need. We activated a large-scale kitchen at an arena and smaller kitchens in restaurants and schools, serving millions of meals at a time when everything seemed paralyzed.

    In Puerto Rico we used three clear approaches to feed our fellow Americans that can be a guide to heading off an economic and food crisis today:

    — Support the private sector as quickly as possible when the economy crashes, as it did after Maria: activate kitchens with federal dollars to serve the people.

    — Repurpose and deploy community facilities, while expanding their mission: use the kitchens in schools and arenas to feed more people, more quickly.

    — Solve the informational and logistical challenge: Matching demand and supply — by getting food to the people who need it most — is even more challenging than cooking in a crisis. Distribution is the Achilles’ heel of any disaster response.

    Since then we have adapted our model to feeding first responders in the California wildfires, as well as stricken communities after natural disasters in the Caribbean and Mozambique. This week I have re-opened several of my own shuttered restaurants as community kitchens, serving meals at low or no cost to people in need.

    But these are only models for what we should do now; they are too small to meet the unprecedented challenges we face as a nation. We need to understand that these crises threaten our national security.

    Today an army of American cooks stands ready to serve our most vulnerable citizens, at a time when those cooks are themselves in desperate need of support. They are our food first responders. With the full support of the federal government, they can serve the many, while saving so many jobs.

    There are three groups in our communities who face the greatest threat from the pandemic: the elderly, the homeless and families struggling to make ends meet.

    As we know from public health officials, the elderly face the greatest risk of infection and mortality. We know that many of them are afraid for their lives in doing something as routine as going to the supermarket.

    Isolation may be the best option for avoiding the pandemic, but our parents and grandparents still need to eat to be healthy in body and soul. The plight of Italy’s elderly is an unspeakable tragedy that we should avoid at all costs.

    Now is the time to stand up the private sector — our neighborhood restaurants — to sustain the lives of our elderly neighbors.

    Congress is currently contemplating a $54 billion request to support our airlines. I respectfully request that at least a similar amount be dedicated to America Eats Now, so that our restaurants and delivery partners can feed our elderly citizens and deliver meals to their doorsteps.

    That measure of spending could sustain our elderly citizens in daily meals, freshly prepared, through the peak of this crisis. It would also sustain our farm workers, food suppliers and delivery agents, who in turn would spend the cash sustaining their own families. There are many hundreds of thousands of food jobs that depend on our restaurants.

    America’s technological innovators, such as Uber and GrubHub, can rapidly adapt a home delivery service for our neighbors who are too fearful to buy their own food. This country’s world-class entrepreneurs can solve these challenges creatively and economically.

    The second group that needs our urgent support are families on the brink of economic disaster. Governors and mayors across the country have rightly grappled with the competing needs to close down schools to limit the spread of the virus, while maintaining the school meal services that keep our kids healthy.

    We need to go several steps further, however. The children who rely on free school meals live in families who are struggling financially at the best of times. Now is the time to extend the school meal program to their families: to turn our school kitchens into community kitchens. For those in suburban and rural areas, we should use the school bus network to deliver food packages along the routes where they normally pick up and drop off students.

    Sadly, school kitchens may not be enough.

    As the crisis worsens, we need to maintain the capacity to support our medical heroes, first responders, senior centers and the homeless, with safe havens of food preparation and distribution.

    Hospital kitchens and senior centers will lose staff to sickness. An army marches on its stomach: Our police and National Guard can no longer rely on their favorite neighborhood food stands and delis.

    Now is the time to prepare our arenas and convention centers — all subsidized by taxpayer dollars, even when owned and operated by private entities — to meet the food needs of this public health catastrophe. Trained to the highest standards of food hygiene, with strict protocols to ensure that infection is not spread through food, our arena chefs should be the last resort for safe cooking for our frontline workers in this war.

    The National Restaurant Association is advocating for a much larger package of support, worth more than $300 billion, as it seeks to save up to seven million jobs through a mixture of grants, loans and deferments. Our restaurant industry faces an existential challenge that we all recognize. It is one of the foundational sectors in our economy: four times bigger than our airline industry in sales, and 18 times bigger in jobs.

    Every industry group should make its case in this crisis. But only those of us who work in restaurants can help revive the economy while feeding and building our communities at the same time. Restaurants were shut down by our governments; they can be revived by our governments to serve the people in their hour of greatest need.

    These challenges can seem overwhelming, but we believe the most effective solutions are often right in front of us. Our small nonprofit has safely prepared and served food in cholera-stricken Mozambique by being meticulous about our daily work. That cholera experience equipped us with the sanitation protocols to feed the virus-infected cruise ships in Japan and California.

    In every disaster zone where we cook for the many, we find that a plate of food is never just a meal on a dish. It is a plate of hope: a message from the community that someone, somewhere cares.

    Now is the time for Congress and the Trump administration to show they care. Together we can ensure that America Eats Now.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #38 - March 23rd, 2020, 3:16 pm
    Post #38 - March 23rd, 2020, 3:16 pm Post #38 - March 23rd, 2020, 3:16 pm
    JoelF wrote:Two of my favorite restaurants, Elizabeth and Vie, are offering reasonably priced, interesting carry-outs (I'm way out of range for delivery). I'm thinking of picnicking if the weather is nice.

    Both of these restaurants have since canceled carry-out and delivery service. Elizabeth cited the reason being for the safety of their customers and staff.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #39 - March 23rd, 2020, 4:08 pm
    Post #39 - March 23rd, 2020, 4:08 pm Post #39 - March 23rd, 2020, 4:08 pm
    This may be an unfair request since I am not able to do it myself. Although I have contributed to staff support for some higher end restaurants, I would like to contribute money to our less well capitalized GNRs. But rather than giving small amounts personally, I wonder if some one might organize a GoFundMe campaign that would distribute our shared LTH-contributed funds to those GNRs who do not rely on backers, but are family, small-scale enterprises.

    It would be a noble venture and I would admire the organizer forever.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #40 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:15 pm
    Post #40 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:15 pm Post #40 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:15 pm
    GAF wrote:This may be an unfair request since I am not able to do it myself. Although I have contributed to staff support for some higher end restaurants, I would like to contribute money to our less well capitalized GNRs. But rather than giving small amounts personally, I wonder if some one might organize a GoFundMe campaign that would distribute our shared LTH-contributed funds to those GNRs who do not rely on backers, but are family, small-scale enterprises.

    It would be a noble venture and I would admire the organizer forever.


    You could order from one and leave a generous tip.
  • Post #41 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:32 pm
    Post #41 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:32 pm Post #41 - March 23rd, 2020, 5:32 pm
    Darren,
    You miss my point. What you say is true IF we are ordering at these GNRs. However, some are closed and many need the kind of collective help that a broad funding process might provide. Any many of us are at home as we should be. However, if each of us were, say, to contribute $100 to a fund, that fund could be given to many restaurants in need. Now, this may not be possible, but it would be appreciated if it were. Perhaps the GNR committee could determine which restaurants are particularly needy and just as we set up a website for tickets, we could do so here. I know that I am asking others to do what I cannot do, but it would be a blessing.

    Certainly there is nothing wrong - and much right - with leaving a generous tip if one happens to order from these GNRs.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #42 - March 23rd, 2020, 6:03 pm
    Post #42 - March 23rd, 2020, 6:03 pm Post #42 - March 23rd, 2020, 6:03 pm
    I understood your point. You made a thoughtful suggestion. I was trying to suggest something that can be done more immediately and practically, especially if no one wants to put your plan into action.
  • Post #43 - March 24th, 2020, 10:57 am
    Post #43 - March 24th, 2020, 10:57 am Post #43 - March 24th, 2020, 10:57 am
    GAF wrote:Darren,
    You miss my point. What you say is true IF we are ordering at these GNRs. However, some are closed and many need the kind of collective help that a broad funding process might provide. Any many of us are at home as we should be. However, if each of us were, say, to contribute $100 to a fund, that fund could be given to many restaurants in need. Now, this may not be possible, but it would be appreciated if it were. Perhaps the GNR committee could determine which restaurants are particularly needy and just as we set up a website for tickets, we could do so here. I know that I am asking others to do what I cannot do, but it would be a blessing.

    Certainly there is nothing wrong - and much right - with leaving a generous tip if one happens to order from these GNRs.

    Relief program for restaurant workers launches Tuesday at Big Star; donations welcome

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/coronavi ... story.html
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #44 - March 24th, 2020, 12:50 pm
    Post #44 - March 24th, 2020, 12:50 pm Post #44 - March 24th, 2020, 12:50 pm
    I felt really bad about being a hermit and not supporting any local businesses so I made a few calls and placed orders for four different parties for dinners from In On Thai yesterday. Was not allowed inside the restaurant and the handoff was clean with great respect to social distancing. Dropped off three of the four orders and made my way home. It all took about an hour and a half. Not sure why, but made me feel a little better. Might need to do this at Rainbow soon.
  • Post #45 - March 25th, 2020, 10:43 am
    Post #45 - March 25th, 2020, 10:43 am Post #45 - March 25th, 2020, 10:43 am
    Other than Alinea group (and I guess Galit), has anyone seen and/or experienced any higher end restaurants offering take out that seems to translate well? Looking for a special occasion dinner and, while perfectly fine with cooking something grand at home, thought it would be a good opportunity to support one of these. But being not too big of a fan of take out/delivery in general, don't want to drop coin on something that is gonna be pretty meh by the time it hits the plate.

    Located just off Kennedy on Logan/Avondale border, so proximity to that/us would be preferred. Also, this is for this weekend, so can't be super sold out in advance (like Alinea).

    TIA
  • Post #46 - March 25th, 2020, 10:56 am
    Post #46 - March 25th, 2020, 10:56 am Post #46 - March 25th, 2020, 10:56 am
    We haven't tried yet but are planning to get one of the avec dinners to go -- they have an interesting selection including rotisserie dinners and rotating set of specials.
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson
  • Post #47 - March 25th, 2020, 11:01 am
    Post #47 - March 25th, 2020, 11:01 am Post #47 - March 25th, 2020, 11:01 am
    We got takeout from Gather/Warbler and it was very enjoyable. They were a little loose on their procedures as I had to go inside to pick up the order. Hopefully they are now honoring curbside pickup more strictly.
  • Post #48 - March 25th, 2020, 11:20 am
    Post #48 - March 25th, 2020, 11:20 am Post #48 - March 25th, 2020, 11:20 am
    I've ordered out from Jeong (they've brought back some hanbun classics) and got pizza from table donkey and stick last night. Both were really good!

    A couple other places I've seen w takeout are PST, avec and avli in river north. Tock has a bunch of options listed for pickup.

    Can't believe you're not more in tune with your local options. Sorry, this still cracks me up....
  • Post #49 - March 25th, 2020, 11:36 am
    Post #49 - March 25th, 2020, 11:36 am Post #49 - March 25th, 2020, 11:36 am
    WhyBeeSea wrote:Can't believe you're not more in tune with your local options. Sorry, this still cracks me up....


    Ask Panther, sure he can help!!! You don't need any stinkin' website! :twisted:
  • Post #50 - March 25th, 2020, 12:05 pm
    Post #50 - March 25th, 2020, 12:05 pm Post #50 - March 25th, 2020, 12:05 pm
    El Ideas is doing a 3-course meal with both meat and veggie options and includes some extras. The truffled arancini that came with our meal the other night was the bomb.
    -Mary
  • Post #51 - March 25th, 2020, 3:05 pm
    Post #51 - March 25th, 2020, 3:05 pm Post #51 - March 25th, 2020, 3:05 pm
    The GP wrote:El Ideas is doing a 3-course meal with both meat and veggie options and includes some extras. The truffled arancini that came with our meal the other night was the bomb.


    I just looked on their website, and was finding no availbility for weeks out - must be wildly successful
  • Post #52 - March 25th, 2020, 3:46 pm
    Post #52 - March 25th, 2020, 3:46 pm Post #52 - March 25th, 2020, 3:46 pm
    I've confirmed with the Trib that anyone can add restaurants to the Tribune's database of open restaurants. I added Cho Sun Ok and contacted the Trib to make sure it was going through and they confirmed it is.

    Hopefully folks here can help out some of our local mom and pop favorites that may not be as internet savvy as the higher tier restos and Restaurant Association members that currently dominate the database.

    Click here to enter info about places you know are open but aren't on the list.
  • Post #53 - March 25th, 2020, 4:04 pm
    Post #53 - March 25th, 2020, 4:04 pm Post #53 - March 25th, 2020, 4:04 pm
    I submitted Szechuan JMC to the dining at a distance website Saturday morning after confirming they were in fact open for carry-out and delivery by phone. It wasn't immediate, but they had added it by Monday morning.

    I picked up Sunday night and it was great. Sauteed Cabbage and Chef's Special Stir-fried Lamb were both new to me, and both phenomenal.
  • Post #54 - March 25th, 2020, 5:57 pm
    Post #54 - March 25th, 2020, 5:57 pm Post #54 - March 25th, 2020, 5:57 pm
    bfolds wrote:We haven't tried yet but are planning to get one of the avec dinners to go -- they have an interesting selection including rotisserie dinners and rotating set of specials.


    We loved and were well-filled by Avec's chicken-for-four meal plus a stellar nduja and honey pizza. It was walked out curbside and loaded into the back seat by staff wearing gloves and armed with wipes. We've been doing really well on vegetables, herbs, and pulses during "All Of This" (as a colleague phrased it) but it was a spot of brightness to have their pickles, beets, excellent olive oil, wood-fired doughs, and high-quality bird. I'll be rationing the remaining harissa for days.
  • Post #55 - March 25th, 2020, 9:30 pm
    Post #55 - March 25th, 2020, 9:30 pm Post #55 - March 25th, 2020, 9:30 pm
    Got some delivery from Chef Xiong, the heir apparent to Szechuan Cuisine, who has fallen off hard. Legit Dandan noodles, cold sesame noodles, pretty good Gongbao, pickled long beans with ground pork, and an eggplant dish. All tasty, no holds barred on spice.

    Also, the receipt had Chinese characters on it. They all matched their English counterparts quite well.
  • Post #56 - March 26th, 2020, 7:46 am
    Post #56 - March 26th, 2020, 7:46 am Post #56 - March 26th, 2020, 7:46 am
    chicagojim wrote:
    The GP wrote:El Ideas is doing a 3-course meal with both meat and veggie options and includes some extras. The truffled arancini that came with our meal the other night was the bomb.


    I just looked on their website, and was finding no availbility for weeks out - must be wildly successful

    From what I can see, they are only offering a couple of days at a time.
    -Mary
  • Post #57 - March 26th, 2020, 9:01 am
    Post #57 - March 26th, 2020, 9:01 am Post #57 - March 26th, 2020, 9:01 am
    El Ideas has a few meals available for today. http://www.elideas.com/
    -Mary
  • Post #58 - March 26th, 2020, 9:17 am
    Post #58 - March 26th, 2020, 9:17 am Post #58 - March 26th, 2020, 9:17 am
    I'm getting regular emails from George Trois -- they're doing pick up.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #59 - March 26th, 2020, 10:53 am
    Post #59 - March 26th, 2020, 10:53 am Post #59 - March 26th, 2020, 10:53 am
    El Ideas has a few meals available for today. http://www.elideas.com/


    Thanks GP for posting the link. I live in the neighborhood and I am planning on getting something.

    I have never been tempted to go to the restaurant because I am a non-drinking vegetarian. But seeing how they are making an effort to be veggie friendly, I gotta support! :)
    The art of living well and art of dying well are one. ---Epicurus
  • Post #60 - March 26th, 2020, 4:07 pm
    Post #60 - March 26th, 2020, 4:07 pm Post #60 - March 26th, 2020, 4:07 pm
    Two more favorites have shown up in my social feed -- Le Bouchon and Osteria Langhe. Both are on limited number of days a week.
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson

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