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The cherry pitter you need to go buy right now

The cherry pitter you need to go buy right now
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  • The cherry pitter you need to go buy right now

    Post #1 - June 17th, 2008, 9:57 am
    Post #1 - June 17th, 2008, 9:57 am Post #1 - June 17th, 2008, 9:57 am
    As a big believer in eating lots of cherries during cherry season, I have tended to run through a cherry pitter about every three years. The one pitter on the market had a fatal design flaw which meant that sooner or later, the blade or whatever you call that cross-shaped spear that went through the cherry and forced the pit out tended to follow a pit out and wind up in the sink, permanently unattached.

    I'm not a big fan of Oxo's "Good Grips" line of kitchen implements, seems like a smart way to charge an extra $5 for a fat piece of rubber around the same device as everyone else makes, but their cherry pitter may change my mind. The cross-shaped spear thing seems much more securely attached, in an entirely different way, and there's also a nice little splash guard that catches much of the Dawn of the Dead-gunshot effect that you normally get when the pit is forced out the back of the cherry. It costs about what two of the old cherry pitters cost, but the investment seems likely to pay off sometime around 2014. I got mine at Sur La Table, but you might look anywhere that carries Oxo products.

    http://www.surlatable.com/product/539882.do
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  • Post #2 - June 17th, 2008, 10:09 am
    Post #2 - June 17th, 2008, 10:09 am Post #2 - June 17th, 2008, 10:09 am
    I've had that cherry pitter for a couple of years, and so far, so good. I find the splash-guard to be only marginally effective, but with an apron dedicated to only cherry-pitting, who cares? (I still pit, though, in a deep sink so as to minimize any oversplash on the countertops.)
  • Post #3 - June 17th, 2008, 10:58 am
    Post #3 - June 17th, 2008, 10:58 am Post #3 - June 17th, 2008, 10:58 am
    Thanks for this. I haven't been able to find ANY cherry pitter for about 2 years. I know Linens 'n' Things does a big Oxo business. May try there.
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #4 - June 17th, 2008, 5:06 pm
    Post #4 - June 17th, 2008, 5:06 pm Post #4 - June 17th, 2008, 5:06 pm
    I'll absolutely vouch for this cherry pitter as well. A great product.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #5 - June 17th, 2008, 9:36 pm
    Post #5 - June 17th, 2008, 9:36 pm Post #5 - June 17th, 2008, 9:36 pm
    Hi,

    I swear by small paperclips for removing cherry pits.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #6 - June 18th, 2008, 1:41 pm
    Post #6 - June 18th, 2008, 1:41 pm Post #6 - June 18th, 2008, 1:41 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I swear by small paperclips for removing cherry pits.

    Regards,


    C2, how does this work?
  • Post #7 - June 18th, 2008, 2:14 pm
    Post #7 - June 18th, 2008, 2:14 pm Post #7 - June 18th, 2008, 2:14 pm
    Jay K wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I swear by small paperclips for removing cherry pits.

    Regards,


    C2, how does this work?


    It's the Martha Stewart method
    When I grow up, I'm going to Bovine University!
  • Post #8 - June 18th, 2008, 3:13 pm
    Post #8 - June 18th, 2008, 3:13 pm Post #8 - June 18th, 2008, 3:13 pm
    Fujisan wrote:
    Jay K wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I swear by small paperclips for removing cherry pits.

    Regards,


    C2, how does this work?


    It's the Martha Stewart method


    FYI - I picked up the idea from reading the Joy of Cooking in the 1980's.

    While Martha makes an effort to preserve the stem side, I take a slightly different approach. I begin by opening a small paper clip to have a large and small loop at each end. Depending on the size of the stone, I will use the larger or smaller loop. The loop enters through the stem depression, then I maneuver the loop to scoop the stone out through the stem hole. I think the cherry looks nice and neat. Whereas I have a few cherry pitters, I think it makes the cherry look tattered.

    When I buy cherries next, I will make a small video clip of my method of pitting cherries.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - June 19th, 2008, 12:50 pm
    Post #9 - June 19th, 2008, 12:50 pm Post #9 - June 19th, 2008, 12:50 pm
    mrbarolo wrote:I know Linens 'n' Things does a big Oxo business. May try there.


    I got mine at Bed, Bath & Beyond. But the Linens & Things across from Old Orchard on Golf Rd. is going out of business, so you may want to take advantage.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

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  • Post #10 - June 21st, 2008, 3:46 pm
    Post #10 - June 21st, 2008, 3:46 pm Post #10 - June 21st, 2008, 3:46 pm
    mrbarolo wrote:Thanks for this. I haven't been able to find ANY cherry pitter for about 2 years. I know Linens 'n' Things does a big Oxo business. May try there.

    :evil: :x :evil: :x :evil: :x :evil: :x :evil: :x :evil: :x

    You want mine? Take it. I don't know what kind it is, it's shiny and silver. I hate it with all my soul. It takes a decade or two to pit a bag of cherries, splatter is no fun, and some of the pits still didn't come out! Thus I had a cherry pie that required some spitting! Ew! All the work isn't worth it, from now on I'm buying frozen and that's that.

    One cherry/olive pitter, used twice, great condition, FREEEEEE.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #11 - June 21st, 2008, 4:09 pm
    Post #11 - June 21st, 2008, 4:09 pm Post #11 - June 21st, 2008, 4:09 pm
    I put the kids to work doing it.

    But it does require checking them to see if the pit really came out. Since I usually slice them in half anyway, no big deal.
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  • Post #12 - March 3rd, 2012, 7:57 pm
    Post #12 - March 3rd, 2012, 7:57 pm Post #12 - March 3rd, 2012, 7:57 pm
    Anyone have one of the big guys like this?

    I want to be ready come the season because I do anticipate another cherrypalooza of canning, with the occasional freezing b/c I have a day job & I don't tend to stay up late.

    http://www.cutleryandmore.com/rosle/sta ... KgodDT4BCA

    http://www.amazon.com/Leifheit-37204-Ch ... rvi_cart_1
    Last edited by pairs4life on March 17th, 2012, 10:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #13 - March 17th, 2012, 6:25 pm
    Post #13 - March 17th, 2012, 6:25 pm Post #13 - March 17th, 2012, 6:25 pm
    My local Marshalls had a few of the Oxo pitters for about $7. Bought one. Caved to LTHForum peer pressure....again.....
  • Post #14 - March 18th, 2012, 12:22 pm
    Post #14 - March 18th, 2012, 12:22 pm Post #14 - March 18th, 2012, 12:22 pm
    I picked up a Cherry Pitter back in the 80's when I was living in KY and needed one for local available produce. (lots at a time!)
    This is the closest I could find to the model I got made in Germany:
    http://www.amazon.com/Leifheit-37200-Ch ... 761&sr=8-3

    Thanks for letting me know about the good grips one - for smaller amounts I will be getting one.
  • Post #15 - March 18th, 2012, 12:43 pm
    Post #15 - March 18th, 2012, 12:43 pm Post #15 - March 18th, 2012, 12:43 pm
    exvaxman wrote:I picked up a Cherry Pitter back in the 80's when I was living in KY and needed one for local available produce. (lots at a time!)
    This is the closest I could find to the model I got made in Germany:
    http://www.amazon.com/Leifheit-37200-Ch ... 761&sr=8-3

    Mine arrived last week.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #16 - March 18th, 2012, 12:50 pm
    Post #16 - March 18th, 2012, 12:50 pm Post #16 - March 18th, 2012, 12:50 pm
    Mine arrived last week.


    Not the same model, just the closest I could find to mine. How does it work?
    Mine has metal throughout, and I would be interested in going to all plastic.
  • Post #17 - March 18th, 2012, 12:51 pm
    Post #17 - March 18th, 2012, 12:51 pm Post #17 - March 18th, 2012, 12:51 pm
    exvaxman wrote:
    Mine arrived last week.


    Not the same model, just the closest I could find to mine. How does it work?
    Mine has metal throughout, and I would be interested in going to all plastic.



    No cherries to pit, may try olives.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #18 - March 18th, 2012, 12:56 pm
    Post #18 - March 18th, 2012, 12:56 pm Post #18 - March 18th, 2012, 12:56 pm
    No cherries to pit, may try olives.


    This has my interest as well :)
    Please let me know how it works!
  • Post #19 - March 20th, 2012, 8:36 am
    Post #19 - March 20th, 2012, 8:36 am Post #19 - March 20th, 2012, 8:36 am
    I have always had more olives to pit than cherries. The problem I have had is our cheap cherry pitter is not tall enough to handle a large green olive. Are any of the the pitters you are mentioning tall enough to handle these large olives?
  • Post #20 - March 20th, 2012, 9:01 pm
    Post #20 - March 20th, 2012, 9:01 pm Post #20 - March 20th, 2012, 9:01 pm
    Here's what you need! Although it might be overkill!

    I've got an old German cherry pitter which works just fine on olives of all sizes. Made out of pot metal, cheap. But very functional.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #21 - March 24th, 2012, 7:49 pm
    Post #21 - March 24th, 2012, 7:49 pm Post #21 - March 24th, 2012, 7:49 pm
    I got one a few years ago at World Market. It works well on olives and cherrys. To prevent the splater I deseed them in a large pot. There is a lot of juice that is in the pot after I do a lot of cherrys so I put it in a strainer and stir the pits to get the juice out of the pulp left behind.
  • Post #22 - May 13th, 2012, 8:36 am
    Post #22 - May 13th, 2012, 8:36 am Post #22 - May 13th, 2012, 8:36 am
    I came across this hint for pitting cherries. Rig up your own cherry pitter using an empty narrow necked bottle and a chopstick. Place the stemmed, washed cherry stem-side up on the bottle opening. Holding the cherry steady with your fingers, use the chopstick to push the pit through the cherry and into the bottle. When done, shake the pits from the bottle into your composter or trash.

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