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Harry's Pizza (Bishop's Corner)- West Hartford, CT

Harry's Pizza (Bishop's Corner)- West Hartford, CT
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  • Harry's Pizza (Bishop's Corner)- West Hartford, CT

    Post #1 - November 29th, 2007, 2:51 pm
    Post #1 - November 29th, 2007, 2:51 pm Post #1 - November 29th, 2007, 2:51 pm
    Let me start by saying that I love pizza in Chicago. Burt's and Pequod's pan, Giordano's stuffed, Malnati's deep dish, the various "NY" and "New Haven" places, Neapolitan, Cracker Crust...it's all good. BUT...and this is big... with all the places doing "NY" and (especially) "New Haven" pizza. I really don't think that any of them get the later right at all. Coalfire is great. I eat their pies several times a month. However, like Piece, New Haven pizza it ain't.

    Outside of Pepe's (which, as several folks here have noted is inconsistent, ranging for sublime to ehh), Sally's, and Modern in New Haven. I know of three places that really get it right. Naples in Farmington, CT. Harry's in West Hartford Center and, the focus of this post and my favorite of the three, Harry's Bishop's Corner.

    So what's the big deal you ask? How is this different from any other thin crust? Well picture NY pizza but with more texture to the sauce, easier on the cheese (but not sparse) and, most importantly a crust that is very thin but never, ever, floppy or soggy. The center of the pie never looses its integrity. Case and point: a study in a perfect pie Harry's bacon and onion pie

    Whole Pie:

    Image

    Close up:

    Image

    "Colors of Italy" (ricotta, basil and roasted reds):

    Image

    While I know West Hartford, CT is not much of a destination, if you ever find yourself in the area, seek it out. You will not be sorry!

    Harry's Bishop's Corner
    732 N Main St
    West Hartford, CT 06117
    Phone: (860) 236-0400
  • Post #2 - November 29th, 2007, 3:32 pm
    Post #2 - November 29th, 2007, 3:32 pm Post #2 - November 29th, 2007, 3:32 pm
    Great post that gets the nostalgia juices flowing. That's the type of pizza I grew up with, although Farmington & West Hartford were a tad too east for me.
  • Post #3 - November 29th, 2007, 4:01 pm
    Post #3 - November 29th, 2007, 4:01 pm Post #3 - November 29th, 2007, 4:01 pm
    Stagger, great post and photos, especially that last one which is the exact pie I tried on my only visit there.

    I recall there being a third in the Harry's family of pizza joints though. Or, come to think of it, didn't the wife take one of them over after they divorced or something ?

    Nab
  • Post #4 - November 29th, 2007, 5:57 pm
    Post #4 - November 29th, 2007, 5:57 pm Post #4 - November 29th, 2007, 5:57 pm
    Just found the answer to my own question (first google hit, go figure) -- Barb, the ex-wife, opened up Barb's Pizza which has now closed, and so she now owns the Harry's in West Hartford Center.

    I'm sure that was just fascinating for all. :roll:
  • Post #5 - November 29th, 2007, 6:09 pm
    Post #5 - November 29th, 2007, 6:09 pm Post #5 - November 29th, 2007, 6:09 pm
    Nab,
    The third spot you are thinking of, if memory serves, is Luna pizza right next door to Harry's in West Hartford center. It is similar but more Neapolitan in style (i.e. fresh moz only and less of it and a thinner sauce). Both get very high ratings but I find both Harry's and Naples to be closer to the New Haven spots when each place is firing on all cylinders.

    Secondly I should also mention that West Hartford has become somewhat of a hot spot for dining with Max's Oysterbar (disclaimer: I have worked for 2 restaurants in the Max group), Bricco, Grant's, and a place that took over the former Azule that I cant remember the name of. If anyone is planning on being in the area drop me a PM and I can do my best to guide you.

    Lastly, you have a hell of a memory (which I am thankful for given what you do for a living :wink: ). What happened with Harry's is that the original spot in West Hartford Center was run by Harry, his wife and a unrelated manager. When Harry and his wife split, she and the manager got, not only the restaurant, but the name Harry's Pizza. So Harry (having lost his name in the divorce :shock: ) wound up opening a spot across town called Harry's Bishop's Corner. They are both good but I find the one run by Harry himself to be the most consistent and given their proximity, it is typically where I head when visiting my family in CT (it is 8 minuets from my father's).

    However for the sake of thoroughness:

    Harry's Pizza
    Neighborhood: West Hartford Center
    1003 Farmington Ave.
    West Hartford, CT 06107
    860-231-7166
    http://www.harryspizza.net


    Luna Pizza
    Neighborhood: West Hartford Center
    999 Farmington Avenue
    West Hartford, CT 06107
    860-233-1625

    Naples Restaurant & Pizza
    838 Farmington Ave
    Farmington, CT 06032-2351
    Phone: (860) 674-8876
    http://www.naplespizza.net/
  • Post #6 - November 30th, 2007, 12:07 am
    Post #6 - November 30th, 2007, 12:07 am Post #6 - November 30th, 2007, 12:07 am
    Excellent news, Stagger! I've been spending quite a bit of time in the New Haven-Hartford-New London triangle. Do you know of any great pizza in
    East Hartford, Windsor, Manchester or Glastonbury?

    Also, could your Harry be the same Harry* that serves great burgers in Colchester?

    * dippity-do-da-egg mentioned this place to me recently, but I didn't make it there on my last trip.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #7 - November 30th, 2007, 8:18 am
    Post #7 - November 30th, 2007, 8:18 am Post #7 - November 30th, 2007, 8:18 am
    Josephine wrote:Excellent news, Stagger! I've been spending quite a bit of time in the New Haven-Hartford-New London triangle. Do you know of any great pizza in
    East Hartford, Windsor, Manchester or Glastonbury?

    Also, could your Harry be the same Harry* that serves great burgers in Colchester?

    * dippity-do-da-egg mentioned this place to me recently, but I didn't make it there on my last trip.


    Certainly a different Harry. He only does pizza west of the Connecticut River as far as I know. I have feelers out to some of my chow associates that spend more time on that side of Hartford. I'll amend this reply with the results.

    Addition: MY father informed me that Pepe's (of New Haven)has opened in Manchester at Buckland Hills.

    Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana
    Address: 221 Buckland Hills Dr # A, Manchester, CT 06042
    Phone: (860) 644-7333

    Don't have a report on how it stacks up yet. He can't think of anyplace else in the area that he would go to as opposed to making the drive to W. Hartford or New Haven. I'll let you know if anyone else replies back and can think of additional spots

    --
    Although, if you are in New Haven or can get there rather than driving north on 91, my choice would be Pepe's if they have fresh clams (skip it of they don't as the red pie is better at....), Sally's if you want a red pie and Modern if you just don't want to deal with Worcester street. I don't really go to Pepe's for anything other than the fresh clam pie which, when done properly, is the highest elevation of that style of pizza in the world for me.
    Last edited by Stagger on November 30th, 2007, 9:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 8:24 am
    Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 8:24 am Post #8 - November 30th, 2007, 8:24 am
    Stagger wrote:The center of the pie never looses its integrity. Case and point: a study in a perfect pie Harry's bacon and onion pie

    Pie with integrity, bacon and onion, might be time to plan a road trip to see CT pizza for myself.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 8:55 am
    Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 8:55 am Post #9 - November 30th, 2007, 8:55 am
    Josephine wrote:Excellent news, Stagger! I've been spending quite a bit of time in the New Haven-Hartford-New London triangle. Do you know of any great pizza in
    East Hartford, Windsor, Manchester or Glastonbury?

    Also, could your Harry be the same Harry* that serves great burgers in Colchester?

    * dippity-do-da-egg mentioned this place to me recently, but I didn't make it there on my last trip.


    Josephine,

    When I met my wife she lived in Clinton, almost exactly in the middle of the New Haven - New London route. I can attest that from my experience your best bets are in New Haven. Our favorite is Modern on State St., but others praise Pepe's and Sally's.

    Additionally, the wive's parents live in Glastonbury. They order at least one pizza during every visit. I don't think that we'll ever see eye to eye on what makes a good pizza. There favorite seems to be what they call 'Greek' pizza. It has a thicker than normal crust (think Rosati's double-dough) and a sweeter sauce. I can't stand the stuff.

    Flip
    "Beer is proof God loves us, and wants us to be Happy"
    -Ben Franklin-
  • Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 3:29 pm
    Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 3:29 pm Post #10 - November 30th, 2007, 3:29 pm
    Flip wrote:There favorite seems to be what they call 'Greek' pizza. It has a thicker than normal crust (think Rosati's double-dough) and a sweeter sauce. I can't stand the stuff.

    Flip


    I grew up in Torrington (NW corner on the Naugatuck River) and most of the pizzerias were Greek-owned, hence, serving Greek pizza (cut in squares instead of like a pie). It's an acquired taste. Even though I haven't set one in my mouth in over 15 years, sometimes I still get a specific craving for it. It's a strange craving akin to craving any type of junky fast food.
  • Post #11 - December 1st, 2007, 10:58 am
    Post #11 - December 1st, 2007, 10:58 am Post #11 - December 1st, 2007, 10:58 am
    Stagger wrote:I have feelers out to some of my chow associates that spend more time on that side of Hartford.

    Addition: MY father informed me that Pepe's (of New Haven)has opened in Manchester at Buckland Hills.

    Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana
    Address: 221 Buckland Hills Dr # A, Manchester, CT 06042
    Phone: (860) 644-7333

    Don't have a report on how it stacks up yet. He can't think of anyplace else in the area that he would go to as opposed to making the drive to W. Hartford or New Haven. I'll let you know if anyone else replies back and can think of additional spots.


    Thanks so much. Amend my earlier comment to read: "AWESOME news, Stagger!"

    This thread has become a prime example of why LTH is so dear to me. This type of sequence is typical of something that happens every day on the board:

    1) Stagger posts on Harford pizza, not really knowing who will resonate with this knowledge.

    2) I haven't yet posted my questions on the East Hartford area when I see this thread.

    3) I follow up.

    4) Stagger generously investigates and produces GOLD: A new Pepe's in Manchester.

    5) Flip raises the topic of "Greek Pizza," with opinions.

    6) This information dovetails with a post on New London eats that I have in the works, in whick I ask a question for locals about this very thing, "Do CT natives on the board know about a style of pizza called Greek pizza? It's rather too cheesy for my taste, and somehow the crust is like a Malnati's crust that is not as short and not left to rise long enough."

    7) aschie30 turns out to be from Torrington, a town I love, and, wonder of wonders, I imagine that I have found someone who can answer the question that has been in my mind for a few months.

    The question: What is the name of that 1950's era white-tablecloth Italian dinner place near the center of Torrington? It has a neon sign with a deco stainless aspect. I had an expertly prepared meal there in 1986, and, as I recall, there is a mural on the wall. Recently, I drove by there after midnight, and was surprised to find it still in business. Alas, it was late, rainy, and foggy, and I didn't have a chance to eat there, leaving it for my next trip.

    Thank you, Stagger, Flip, aschie30. Vive LTH forum!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #12 - December 1st, 2007, 12:46 pm
    Post #12 - December 1st, 2007, 12:46 pm Post #12 - December 1st, 2007, 12:46 pm
    Josephine wrote:The question: What is the name of that 1950's era white-tablecloth Italian dinner place near the center of Torrington? It has a neon sign with a deco stainless aspect. I had an expertly prepared meal there in 1986, and, as I recall, there is a mural on the wall. Recently, I drove by there after midnight, and was surprised to find it still in business. Alas, it was late, rainy, and foggy, and I didn't have a chance to eat there, leaving it for my next trip.

    Thank you, Stagger, Flip, aschie30. Vive LTH forum!


    The Venetian? I graduated from high school in the same class as the owners' son. Wonder of all wonders, what on Earth would bring you to Torrington?
  • Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:28 pm
    Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:28 pm Post #13 - December 2nd, 2007, 7:28 pm
    aschie30 wrote:
    The Venetian? I graduated from high school in the same class as the owners' son. Wonder of all wonders, what on Earth would bring you to Torrington?


    I grew up in Avon and W. Hartford. I knew and worked with lots of folks from Torrrington as its right down Rt. 44. I even contemplated moving there but, happily, came back to Chicago.

    New Haven pizza in Hartford County is a relatively new thing. I grew up on "Greek" pizza which, of course, the only Greek thing about is that the owners of many of the establishments are/were Greek. The actual pie is no more Greek than a hamburger from the Billy Goat Tavern. My favorite spot growing up was in West Hartford called Pizza West near what is now Blue Back Square near West Hartford Center. It was taken over a few months ago by the wine shop my family frequents called West Side Wines (great wine shop by the way!) that it shared a small strip mall with. I didn't go there much after we got NH pizza but it was a great nostalgia trip. This is the Connecticut version of deep dish and it is probably why I have always had an affinity for the latter.

    Pizza West pizza was always a cheese bomb with a buttery, crunchy, puffy crust of medium thickness. The sauce had the consistency of Ragu but had character in its spice and fresh herbs. I guess the easiest way to describe it was if Pizza Hut started a "micro-pizzeria" and licensed them only to Chicago's gyro restaurateurs, you would have CT "Greek" pizza. It is indeed the dominant style of pizza in CT by volume if I had to guess. I don't really know of any one place that is exceptional now that Pizza West is gone, though I am sure they exist. I also don't know if I would seek it out if I was just visiting CT, given the other unique and exceptional pizza one can find there. I do know, however, that I do miss just knowing that my favorite pizza joint of my youth is still there when I want it.

    West Side Wines & Spirits
    http://www.westsidewines.com/
    10 Raymond Rd
    West Hartford, CT 06107
    (860) 233-1241
  • Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 8:09 pm
    Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 8:09 pm Post #14 - December 2nd, 2007, 8:09 pm
    aschie30 wrote:The Venetian? I graduated from high school in the same class as the owners' son. Wonder of all wonders, what on Earth would bring you to Torrington?


    Yup. That's it. The Venetian. I guess it's not as old as I thought, but I do remember having the best saltimbocca of my life there.

    What would bring me to Torrington? Funny that you should ask. It was many years before LTH, but I was living in Litchfield County in the mid-80's. I had heard about Torrington's Italian markets and went up there just before Christmas to explore. A kind grocer ended up spending about a half an hour explaining the preparation of salt cod to me and showing me around the store. After that, I couldn't get enough of Torrington. It has the same kind of appeal as all real places-- the cities that have yet to be ruined by Disneyfication.

    Stagger wrote:Pizza West pizza was always a cheese bomb with a buttery, crunchy, puffy crust of medium thickness. The sauce had the consistency of Ragu but had character in its spice and fresh herbs.


    Well put, Stagger. This is the pizza of New London. I also had it at a Greek Place in Kent, CT, which I think was called "Three Brothers."
    My daughter complained about the pizza, but I was glad the rental car's tire had gone flat there, rather than later, in some pizza-free zone.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 10:00 pm
    Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 10:00 pm Post #15 - December 2nd, 2007, 10:00 pm
    Isn't Piece supposedly trying to duplicate the CT - type style of pizza.

    Have you tasted their pizza and how does it compare?

    edit...nevermind...I see you mentioned Piece in your original post. However, how well does Piece come close to the "true" experience?
  • Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 10:48 am
    Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 10:48 am Post #16 - December 3rd, 2007, 10:48 am
    Josephine wrote:
    aschie30 wrote:The Venetian? I graduated from high school in the same class as the owners' son. Wonder of all wonders, what on Earth would bring you to Torrington?


    Yup. That's it. The Venetian. I guess it's not as old as I thought, but I do remember having the best saltimbocca of my life there.

    What would bring me to Torrington? Funny that you should ask. It was many years before LTH, but I was living in Litchfield County in the mid-80's. I had heard about Torrington's Italian markets and went up there just before Christmas to explore. A kind grocer ended up spending about a half an hour explaining the preparation of salt cod to me and showing me around the store. After that, I couldn't get enough of Torrington. It has the same kind of appeal as all real places-- the cities that have yet to be ruined by Disneyfication.


    Wow, this is an interesting perspective, indeed. Growing up in T-town, the insular nature of the town (as with a lot of New England towns), creates a lot of restlessness on the part of the town's youth and people (like myself)tend to head out for "greener pastures" in the way of NYC (or Chicago or Boston or the West Coast). Having said that, Litchfield is still one of my favorite places to be around Christmastime. I would say that opposing Disneyfication is a hallmark of insular New England towns (although the outskirts of Torrington have been infested by Wal-Mart, Price-Chopper, Target, etc.). I think I recall that many, many years ago, someone wanted to open a McDonald's franchise in Litchfield. The town gave them such a problem about how the exterior of the McDonald's would have to look, and that it would have to be in line with the historical architecture, not have bright signs, be put in an existing building, etc., that the potential franchisee was chased away. To this day, I still don't think there exists a fast food franchise within the town limits.

    Torrington is a mostly Roman Catholic town (for a town of about 30,000, there were approximately 6 or 7 Catholic churches when I was living there). Consequently, there is a very vibrant Italian-American culture. As I've written here, Carbone's Market still produces some of the best Italian-style grinders I've ever had.

    I found this topic on Roadfood.com, which discusses "Greek pizza" in Connecticut. Some suggest that the dough rises in the oven, but not before it is slathered with olive oil. One wonders whether this is the Greeks' version of pizza dough, but culled from their flatbread tradition. Three such Greek pizza parlors in Torrington are Nicholas pizza, South End Two Guys and North End Two Guys (I think the original owners of the two Two Guys were related). I'm 34, and those places have been around for at least my lifetime, and when I was last back there about three years ago, they were still in business. What I think happens is that the Greek immigrants come here, run the pizza place for 10, maybe even 15 years, then take their money, go back to Greece, and send another set of immigrants over to do the same thing for a time. So there's some type of continuity there.

    Stagger wrote:I grew up in Avon and W. Hartford. I knew and worked with lots of folks from Torrrington as its right down Rt. 44. I even contemplated moving there but, happily, came back to Chicago.


    What a small world. I know that area fairly well, especially along of Rt. 44 from Torrington into Hartford. (I can picture the various points of the route, the hills along New Hartford, through to the Saybrook Fish House restaurant, the old shopping center in Canton, the Big Boy in Avon . . .). My uncle lived in Canton, my aunt and uncle lived for many years in Simsbury, right near the Avon mall. My mother worked at St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, and my uncle from Simsbury worked for the former Gov. O'Neill (who recently passed away, last week, I believe). That is a truly beautiful area, and not so isolated as T-town. :wink:
  • Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:04 am
    Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:04 am Post #17 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:04 am
    Now you all have gotten me thinking of "heritage" pizza (i.e., pizza that I grew up with).

    Josephine (or anyone else) - have you been to the Berkshire Pub on Albert Street in Torrington? It's housed in a vintage building and is known for its pizza. They slip the hot pizza into a brown paper bag for takeout. Now there's a different style of pizza altogether. It's baked in a pan, but it's crisp and much thicker than the tavern-style, Chicago-thin crust. Not nearly as buttery, either.

    I'm going to have to plan a trip back East just to research pizza.
  • Post #18 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:06 am
    Post #18 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:06 am Post #18 - December 3rd, 2007, 11:06 am
    Snark wrote:Isn't Piece supposedly trying to duplicate the CT - type style of pizza.

    Have you tasted their pizza and how does it compare?

    edit...nevermind...I see you mentioned Piece in your original post. However, how well does Piece come close to the "true" experience?


    Keep in mind, I tend to be inclusive when in comes to pizza. Pizza snobbery simply based on type, doesn't appeal to me. I try to evaluate most pies on their individual merits.

    That said, I will say two things on Piece. First I like the place a great deal. When combined with JC's beer (John Cutler who has been in my extended circle of friends since before he was at Goose Island - many of his beers are named after our common musical interests such as Worryin' Ale) it is a great place to have a meal. Secondly, Piece isn't really patterned after the famous New Haven places like Pepe's and Sally's IMHO. The toppings are absolutely similar with the white clam pies and such but I find their pie to be a direct descendant of a much newer place called "Bar". They opened in 1991, as far as I know, were the first place to put mashed potato on their pizza. Bar also brought out their pizza in sheet pans with the dough hitting every corner. I don't think there is anything wrong with calling Piece New Haven pizza but it isn't quite what I think of when comparing it to the "big three" of Pepe's, Sally's and Modern but I still like it more than most other thin crust in Chicago.

    Bar
    254 Crown Sreet
    New Haven, CT 06511
    (203) 495-8924
    http://www.barnightclub.com/
  • Post #19 - January 8th, 2008, 4:47 pm
    Post #19 - January 8th, 2008, 4:47 pm Post #19 - January 8th, 2008, 4:47 pm
    Stagger wrote:Nab,
    The third spot you are thinking of, if memory serves, is Luna pizza right next door to Harry's in West Hartford center. It is similar but more Neapolitan in style (i.e. fresh moz only and less of it and a thinner sauce). Both get very high ratings but I find both Harry's and Naples to be closer to the New Haven spots when each place is firing on all cylinders.
    izza.net/[/url]


    I'm a big fan of Luna Pizza. I still like Pepe's in New Haven better (they are different kinds of pizza, though, so tough to compare), but it's definitely worth checking out if you're in the West Hartford area.]
  • Post #20 - September 30th, 2008, 7:46 pm
    Post #20 - September 30th, 2008, 7:46 pm Post #20 - September 30th, 2008, 7:46 pm
    aschie30 wrote:
    Josephine wrote:The question: What is the name of that 1950's era white-tablecloth Italian dinner place near the center of Torrington? It has a neon sign with a deco stainless aspect. I had an expertly prepared meal there in 1986, and, as I recall, there is a mural on the wall. Recently, I drove by there after midnight, and was surprised to find it still in business. Alas, it was late, rainy, and foggy, and I didn't have a chance to eat there, leaving it for my next trip.

    Thank you, Stagger, Flip, aschie30. Vive LTH forum!


    The Venetian? I graduated from high school in the same class as the owners' son. Wonder of all wonders, what on Earth would bring you to Torrington?

    After several recent trips through Torrington at inconvenient hours, I finally made my way there at dinner time this past Sunday. The question was whether to hit Scarpelli's or The Venetian. Nostalgia won out. The Venetian it was. Here are the pictures:

    Image

    Image

    Small wonder that I remembered the mural-even 22 years later, huh? I went for the $21.95 prix fixe with shrimp cocktail and saltimbocca. The food was good, but I was there for the ambiance-and the pictures for aschie30's benefit.

    Oh, and by the way, I'm bumping this thread for germuska's benefit. He was at Harry's Bishop's Corner last Saturday and I'm hoping he'll post here.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #21 - October 1st, 2008, 6:22 am
    Post #21 - October 1st, 2008, 6:22 am Post #21 - October 1st, 2008, 6:22 am
    Josephine wrote:Small wonder that I remembered the mural-even 22 years later, huh? I went for the $21.95 prix fixe with shrimp cocktail and saltimbocca. The food was good, but I was there for the ambiance-and the pictures for aschie30's benefit.


    Thanks, Josephine! Wow, the restaurant looks frozen in time -- nothing has changed. I have to plan a trip back east soon . . .
  • Post #22 - October 1st, 2008, 8:31 pm
    Post #22 - October 1st, 2008, 8:31 pm Post #22 - October 1st, 2008, 8:31 pm
    Josephine wrote:Oh, and by the way, I'm bumping this thread for germuska's benefit. He was at Harry's Bishop's Corner last Saturday and I'm hoping he'll post here.

    Busted!

    It's true. In Hartford for a wedding last weekend, we had a window for lunch before the ceremony and decided to give HPBC a shot. In short, we were glad we did.

    We ordered a "colors of Italy" and a white clams casino pizza. The "colors of italy"is served on wheat crust (from the menu, the wheat crust sounds new, and the older photos look like they predate this). We also got a nice bottle of wine for $14, and they advertise more bottles for $10.

    Both pizzas were very good, with a nice dusting of cornmeal on the underside of the crust and baked just perfectly. While not dissing the "colors", I was much more a fan of the white clams casino pizza. Each bite was jammed with flavor, as you might guess from the ingredients list: clams, bacon, onions, peppers, fresh garlic, lemon.

    A delightful bonus: with our check we received small lemon sorbets in palate cleanser sizes. A really nice way to finish the meal.

    I was going to scan the delivery menu, but they have it online.
    http://harrysbc.com
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #23 - January 24th, 2009, 10:51 pm
    Post #23 - January 24th, 2009, 10:51 pm Post #23 - January 24th, 2009, 10:51 pm
    I finally made it to Harry's Bishop's corner this evening. It is a tiny spot with nice wooden booths. There was a short wait, even though I arrived before 6 PM, and the takeout customers arrived in a steady stream. I was tempted by the clams casino pizza, but I ended up ordering a small white clam pie: chopped clams, mozzarella, olive oil and lemon. The combination of mild cheese and clams was quite subtle, such that the clams and mozzarella blended; each came forward momentarily and then receded.. I suspect that garlic was involved, but it must have been a flavoring in the oil, as I never identified it on its own. I could not isolate the flavor of lemon, but a minute sprinkling of very fine thyme was noted. Harry's Bishop's Corner makes a very good pie, but the crust, while crisp, is too thin and uniformly textured for me. (That is, I find it too uniform within the genre of New Haven pie. The Frank Pepe's crust, while occasionally burned, has yeast bubbles of varying sizes. creating a more varied texture, somewhat stretchy.) I will report back when I have tried Harrys and see how it compares. Note that Harry's Bishop's Corner is the favorite pizza of Advocate* readers.

    * The Advocate is Hartford's "alternative" free paper. It has a rotating list of local restaurants with blurbs that lack any critical acumen, however, the really good local spots are well-represented. It's important to avoid any place that rates fewer than 3 and a half stars.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.

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