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David Burke's Primehouse - Yowsa!

David Burke's Primehouse - Yowsa!
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  • Post #61 - February 26th, 2007, 5:07 pm
    Post #61 - February 26th, 2007, 5:07 pm Post #61 - February 26th, 2007, 5:07 pm
    SungBros wrote:MWe arrived without reservations, they told us they could set us up with a table, but asked us if we thought an hour and fifteen would be long enough for our meal...............After the plates had been cleared from the steak, the manager came to our table and very politely asked us if we would like to enjoy dessert and drinks in their lounge at their expense.



    Wow, that's really impressive service. They just moved to the top of my must-try-steakhouse list. Thanks for the report.
  • Post #62 - February 28th, 2007, 11:27 pm
    Post #62 - February 28th, 2007, 11:27 pm Post #62 - February 28th, 2007, 11:27 pm
    Their breakfast is nothing to sneeze at. They have a great tea list and they just started a 3 course lunch for $20... I didn't read that menu too closely but I keep hearing great things about them. From the beef to the dirty martinis.

    I did order the egg white omelette. I thought that was funny.
    "Yum"
    -- Everyone

    www.chicagofoodies.com
  • Post #63 - April 26th, 2007, 5:32 pm
    Post #63 - April 26th, 2007, 5:32 pm Post #63 - April 26th, 2007, 5:32 pm
    Here's an interesting study on consumer preference for wet aged vs. dry aged beef.

    http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/abstract/84/5/1221 (short version)

    The full version doesn't work for free anymore. I think it worked for me before because it was on my school's network.
    Last edited by pugsley on April 27th, 2007, 11:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #64 - April 26th, 2007, 6:03 pm
    Post #64 - April 26th, 2007, 6:03 pm Post #64 - April 26th, 2007, 6:03 pm
    To determine sensory preference and value of fresh beef steak differing in aging technique, strip steaks were evaluated by consumers in Denver (n = 132 consumers) and Chicago (n = 141 consumers).


    I am very, very disappointed in LTH for not letting me know about this study when they were still researching in Chicago.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #65 - April 27th, 2007, 8:18 pm
    Post #65 - April 27th, 2007, 8:18 pm Post #65 - April 27th, 2007, 8:18 pm
    not only is the prime house's dinner great, their breakfast rivals some of the best in chicago. i've gone twice - once i had the proscuitto, artichoke, spinach omelet and the second time i had the banana maple walnut pancakes.

    and next time, i'll be ordering the pancakes again. enough said.

    great restaurant & a superior hotel.
    stephanie
    www.thefrugalfoodie.com

    -Dining is and always was a great artistic opportunity- FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
  • Post #66 - August 11th, 2007, 11:40 pm
    Post #66 - August 11th, 2007, 11:40 pm Post #66 - August 11th, 2007, 11:40 pm
    I spent the past hour writing a lengthy review of my first meal at David Burke's Primehouse Saturday night - and deleted the text from my computer. What I have to say can be summed up with fewer words:

    + The crab cake appetizer was very good.

    + My friend loves martini's and said the two he had before dinner were excellent.

    + My steak had good flavor - but I had to send it back to the kitchen (while I ate my tasty asparagus side before it got cold) because it was undercooked, and it never was corrected to my complete satisfaction (but I did eat it without further fuss). My friend's steak was very much undercooked, but he wouldn't send it back to be corrected - and seeing it was undercooked the waitress did nothing but show a lot of teeth.

    + The wait staff gave every appearance of being inexperienced, badly trained and not well supervised as they took the orders, brought your drinks, and bussed the tables.

    + The bus boys run the dining room - they serve all of your food, they prepare your Caesar Salad, etc., they did just about everything I expect a good waiter or to do at that price point.

    + I expected a better clientele and didn't appreciate the people wandering in wearing T-shirts hanging out and blue jeans, others walking back and forth through the room with beer bottles in hand drinking from them, etc. It reminded me of a college cafeteria out of control.

    + The seemingly constant flashes from cameras was distracting.

    + The noise level was so high that we had to almost shout across the table to be heard, and my ears hurt as if I'd been sitting front of a concert arena high-powered speaker system for an hour or two.

    The meal nor the experience were worth the price we paid for dinner. Calling David Burke’s a “Chicago Steak House” is an insult to the other fine establishments in the city.
  • Post #67 - August 13th, 2007, 3:30 pm
    Post #67 - August 13th, 2007, 3:30 pm Post #67 - August 13th, 2007, 3:30 pm
    + I expected a better clientele and didn't appreciate the people wandering in wearing T-shirts hanging out and blue jeans, others walking back and forth through the room with beer bottles in hand drinking from them, etc. It reminded me of a college cafeteria out of control.

    + The seemingly constant flashes from cameras was distracting.


    Okay, I can understand your other gripes--but what do you propose the restaurant do about these two problems?

    Yes, they could institute a dress code. If people dressed a certain way at a restaurant offend your obviously delicate sensibilities, then maybe you should only go to restaurants that require a jacket.

    Same goes for cameras. I've never heard of a restaurant that had a "no cameras" policy. Did you inquire with the manager about this? If it was truly so eggregiously disturbing your dinner, why not see if something could be done about it.
  • Post #68 - August 13th, 2007, 4:02 pm
    Post #68 - August 13th, 2007, 4:02 pm Post #68 - August 13th, 2007, 4:02 pm
    bananasandwiches wrote:+ I expected a better clientele and didn't appreciate the people wandering in wearing T-shirts hanging out and blue jeans, others walking back and forth through the room with beer bottles in hand drinking from them, etc. It reminded me of a college cafeteria out of control.

    + The seemingly constant flashes from cameras was distracting.

    Okay, I can understand your other gripes--but what do you propose the restaurant do about these two problems?

    Yes, they could institute a dress code. If people dressed a certain way at a restaurant offend your obviously delicate sensibilities, then maybe you should only go to restaurants that require a jacket.


    You seem awfully defensive, bordering on rude. I don't get it -- were you one of the people in a t-shirt and jeans?

    In re-reading Bill's review, I don't think that he was blaming the restaurant, or suggesting that they institute a dress code. He simply was making an observation for the benefit of others on the forum. If I were to spend $100+ per person for a special-occasion dinner, it doesn't sound like the kind of atmosphere that I'd be seeking. I, for one, am glad that Bill made these observations in addition to his comments about the food. Your comment that perhaps he only should go to "restaurants that require a jacket" strikes me as uncalled for.
  • Post #69 - August 13th, 2007, 7:45 pm
    Post #69 - August 13th, 2007, 7:45 pm Post #69 - August 13th, 2007, 7:45 pm
    As to the roving bands of jeans-clad beer drinkers, keep in mind that Burke's is located in the hotel, which means that it may be subject to the dress preferences of its hotel clientele. Having said that, each time I've been to Burke's or the James Hotel (for drinks), the vast majority of the clientele is very fashionably dressed. Fear of fratboys should not keep you away from this place. :)
  • Post #70 - August 13th, 2007, 9:21 pm
    Post #70 - August 13th, 2007, 9:21 pm Post #70 - August 13th, 2007, 9:21 pm
    Personally, I'd be much more bothered if they were wearing their jeans with their T-shirts TUCKED IN... :twisted:
    ...Pedro
  • Post #71 - August 14th, 2007, 7:15 am
    Post #71 - August 14th, 2007, 7:15 am Post #71 - August 14th, 2007, 7:15 am
    Given the choice, I'd rather visit a steakhouse with people in jeans and tees (assuming it's hip rather than sloppy), than a steakhouse requiring jackets or littered with people wearing blazers.



    YoYoPedro wrote:Personally, I'd be much more bothered if they were wearing their jeans with their T-shirts TUCKED IN... :twisted:



    Very true, especially if it's sans belt. :wink:
  • Post #72 - August 17th, 2007, 7:15 pm
    Post #72 - August 17th, 2007, 7:15 pm Post #72 - August 17th, 2007, 7:15 pm
    Ralph Wiggum wrote:Given the choice, I'd rather visit a steakhouse with people in jeans and tees (assuming it's hip rather than sloppy), than a steakhouse requiring jackets or littered with people wearing blazers.



    YoYoPedro wrote:Personally, I'd be much more bothered if they were wearing their jeans with their T-shirts TUCKED IN... :twisted:



    Very true, especially if it's sans belt. :wink:


    I'd prefer Tank Tops Shorts and Flip Flops
  • Post #73 - August 17th, 2007, 8:39 pm
    Post #73 - August 17th, 2007, 8:39 pm Post #73 - August 17th, 2007, 8:39 pm
    Marshall K wrote:I'd prefer Tank Tops Shorts and Flip Flops

    You are less likely to find such a place here in Chicago, but I'm sure you can find them in Miami, Key West, etc. And actually, I've been to Smith & Wollensky here in Chicago on numerous occasions in shorts, sandals and a high-end t-shirt, and been served excellent food, with superb service. I felt comfortable, and from what I could tell, I disturbed no one around me.
    ...Pedro
  • Post #74 - August 17th, 2007, 9:59 pm
    Post #74 - August 17th, 2007, 9:59 pm Post #74 - August 17th, 2007, 9:59 pm
    As an aside, while I think knowing if your beef is dry or wet aged is important at a steakhouse, grass fed vs grain fed is significantly more important and impacts the taste significantly more. That said, I've been to plenty of places where wet aged steaks far outshine dry aged steaks for a variety of reasons. (Smith and Wollensky I'm talking to you here.)
    is making all his reservations under the name Steve Plotnicki from now on.
  • Post #75 - August 17th, 2007, 10:26 pm
    Post #75 - August 17th, 2007, 10:26 pm Post #75 - August 17th, 2007, 10:26 pm
    YoYoPedro wrote: in shorts, sandals and a high-end t-shirt


    The concept of a "high-end t-shirt" is an oxymoron, to me, but to each his own.

    Personally, I dress very casually to work and find the notion of anyone tucking a t-shirt in ridiculous, sans belt or not.

    That being said, I also have no problem with a restaurant having a dress code.

    My point is - dress for the occassion - don't confuse it by adding a belt to a t-shirt (or a $100 RL label), and if you're going to a nice steakhouse, find a decent pair of slacks and a shirt, for crying out loud.
  • Post #76 - August 18th, 2007, 6:35 pm
    Post #76 - August 18th, 2007, 6:35 pm Post #76 - August 18th, 2007, 6:35 pm
    YoYoPedro wrote:
    Marshall K wrote:I'd prefer Tank Tops Shorts and Flip Flops

    You are less likely to find such a place here in Chicago, but I'm sure you can find them in Miami, Key West, etc. And actually, I've been to Smith & Wollensky here in Chicago on numerous occasions in shorts, sandals and a high-end t-shirt, and been served excellent food, with superb service. I felt comfortable, and from what I could tell, I disturbed no one around me.


    Actually I was joking, I am old school. I really enjoy puting on a jacket and tie and having my SO wear something that actually shows her legs. On many occaions I have told women in nice resturants that it is refreshing to see a woman wearing a dress as it is so rare these days. And trust me they have all been flattered. (I'm talking about women of all ages)
  • Post #77 - September 18th, 2007, 7:14 pm
    Post #77 - September 18th, 2007, 7:14 pm Post #77 - September 18th, 2007, 7:14 pm
    My wife and I decided to make our first trip to Chicago this past weekend. We were celebrating our first wedding anniversary, and I figured giving the esteemed Professor Excess a call. With reccomendations in hand, I made reservations at Primehouse. I was excited, as it turns out a co-worker used to work with David back in NYC, and he gushed at what I was about to experience.

    We started with the shrimp cocktail, which was almost perfect (the
    jumbos were a bit too big and just slightly overdone, but this is just
    me picking a nit. The ginger aioli was a great addition. My Caesar
    was out of sight. Stunning. The table side presentation just adds to
    the love I have for this dish, and this restaurant. The flavors -
    bright lemon quickly absorbed into a rich emulsion of sweet oil,
    slightly spicy, acidic mustard, a shot of garlic - which is tied
    together with the most slight hint of anchovy - creating this savory
    package that finishes with a touch of garlic heat. Each bite was an
    absolute pleasure and a study in exceptional thought about the nature
    of this classic dish.

    Jessie went with the "Wedge", which was a noble attempt at updating
    the now resurrected steakhouse classic, just didn't take off. The
    tomatoes were mealy and flavorless, gritty almost - and distracted
    from the overall salad. Sometimes, you have to go out on a ledge (the
    beet "maki" salad looked excellent), other times, you can't delude
    your diners. This one could have won with a great tomato, but a
    tomato compote / reduction at the bottom of the plate does not make up
    for a bad tomato. I was willing to give it a 7, but, Jessie was in
    the 5 range. Tough break, and the only one of the meal.

    The sommalier service was stunningly exceptional. I didn't even catch
    her name - but she was exactly what one expects (and thensome) from a good sommalier. We had a great dialogue about
    thier Rhone-side of the menu, and settled on a Patrick Jasmin Cote-Rotie (2000) that
    was perfect with the steak. No upselling (I mentioned a $160 bottle I wanted; she steered me towards the Cote-Rotie [which is what I wanted in the first place!]), a fluid conversation, exceptional insights, and she even ensured our glasses were topped off (when the waiter was otherwise occupied), and even
    checked back twice to ensure we were enjoying the bottle.

    I could write on and on and on for pages about the steak. Jessie went
    with the South Side bone-in filet, which had a GREAT crust. She was
    in love with it from first bite, and went as far to inform me that I
    could be replaced by this steak. My 65 day ribeye was beyond
    comparison. Minerally rich, a beefy, delicious tang and a tenderness
    that belies such an "old" piece of meat. I wish I could thank the
    steer that gave it's life so honorably, and the chef who had the
    intuition to respect that sacrifice to create this steak. The waiter
    asked how I liked my steak - and I blurted out "Absolutely fucking
    magnificent, the best steak of my life." The waiter beamed back "I've
    always wanted to hear that! That's what I want to tell the customers
    - this is the most fucking amazing steak you will ever eat". He's
    right, it is.

    Jessie, a medium well kinda gal, went to a Medium+ for her bone-in. The crust on this steak, as I alluded to before, was just delicious. The flavor in this cut was nice, very tender, and very well put together. For a filet, this was a great presentation. Jessie was clearly smitten.

    We did tempura green beans and the twice baked potato (filled with a
    broccoli gratin), which were very nice. But I couldn't imagine eating
    anything but the steak. The tempura was quite nice, but
    it seemed a bit greasy to me (Jessie completely disagreed). The twice
    baked potato was enjoyable and provided a good dose of green
    coated in a healthy slug of cheddar cheese, which is what any good
    chef should do with greenery.

    We rounded out with a glass of the 77 Warres port (I was yearning for
    the Maderia flight), the cheesecake tree, and espressos each. All I
    needed was a Partagas P or a Aurora Preforido and I would have in
    heaven.

    The service was outstanding - there when we needed it, invisible when
    required, and filling in the parts inbetween - and I was simply smitten overall.

    Primehouse was the singular best steak I have ever had in my life. I
    could drown the meal in superlatives and flowy prose but that doesn't
    do it justice. Exceptional service, amazing meats, probably the most
    flawless and integrated Caesar salad I've ever had the pleasure of
    eating, and a great wine list. In my (all too recent) consulting days, I seemed to hit every "I'm a captain of industry" steak joint with clients across our fair nation. What always grates against me is that these places think that they can put big prices on the menu, serve room temperature Chateau Montelena and throw a short, attitude-laden waiter at you and you'll have a great meal. Primehouse short-cuts all of that and let's the food shine, with a modern atmosphere and naugahyde tables (I agree with Gary, they are ugly, but hey, I like a change of pace from white linen and oak panels), with exceptional service to boot.

    Did I mention that I loved this meal?

    Cheers,

    -Andrew
    Remember kids, last one dead is a sissy
  • Post #78 - September 18th, 2007, 7:34 pm
    Post #78 - September 18th, 2007, 7:34 pm Post #78 - September 18th, 2007, 7:34 pm
    astanley wrote: . . . My 65 day ribeye was beyond
    comparison. Minerally rich, a beefy, delicious tang and a tenderness
    that belies such an "old" piece of meat. I wish I could thank the
    steer that gave it's life so honorably, and the chef who had the
    intuition to respect that sacrifice to create this steak. The waiter
    asked how I liked my steak - and I blurted out "Absolutely fucking
    magnificent, the best steak of my life." The waiter beamed back "I've
    always wanted to hear that! That's what I want to tell the customers
    - this is the most fucking amazing steak you will ever eat". He's
    right, it is. . .

    I've had their bone-in, 40-day aged ribeye on multiple occasions but every time I've visited, they had already run out of the beyond 40-day steaks. I'm jealous that you had the 65-day ribeye, but I'm most curious to hear from anyone who has had both and can compare textures and flavors.
  • Post #79 - September 20th, 2007, 1:08 pm
    Post #79 - September 20th, 2007, 1:08 pm Post #79 - September 20th, 2007, 1:08 pm
    Just a tip, a friend who works at The James told me the other day that the menu would be changing today. I'm not sure if the changes are all that important, but the Angry Lobster is back and newly designed Sliders are up. For dessert I heard about a Guiness ice cream with a Whiskey mousse and a chocolate pretzel. Just a heads up. :wink: And stop by the J bar for some great drinks and exceptional service. GM Andi and assistant GM Jimi are a blast to chat with.
    GOOD TIMES!
  • Post #80 - September 20th, 2007, 2:26 pm
    Post #80 - September 20th, 2007, 2:26 pm Post #80 - September 20th, 2007, 2:26 pm
    I'm going to Primehouse after the marathon (my GF is running in it) and hopefully I will get to try this 40+ day ribeye! I used to wait tables at Capital Grille and their steaks are great, but usually only dry-aged about 21 days.
    - Mark

    Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon? Ham? Pork chops?
    Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
    Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.
  • Post #81 - October 12th, 2007, 3:14 pm
    Post #81 - October 12th, 2007, 3:14 pm Post #81 - October 12th, 2007, 3:14 pm
    I went the other night and have to say I wasn't all that impressed by the food. I know David's restaurants and to a lesser extent, David, from my days in NYC and this was on the top of my list, now that I have some of the fine/ avant garde dining destinations and ethnic food off my list.

    Service was great and so was the Caesar salad and hash browns.

    The spinach was average, as were the shrimps. The steak, 40 day Kansas City (maybe it was 35,) was only ok and that was after I sent it back not once but TWICE. A good steakhouse should be able to execute a medium-rare steak flawlessly. First time was clerly medium and second time was rare. Finally, after they "fired" the rare steak again I got a steak that was a touch over medium rare. The server was very understanding and accomodating and even brough us a gratis dessert.

    The scene was more like a Vegas steakhouse or as a poster said, like Miami than any other steak experience I have enjoyed. Pleny of young, nouveaux riche, euro-wanna be dudes with a floosy or two. And was quite loud. I am not old (32) and don't care how people are dressed, but there was excessive hooting and hollering and this was a Tuesday night. I can only imagine a weekend!

    All in all, I tiped our server very well (Gabriel) but doubt I would return. I would much prefer to go back to Joe's even though it is pricier and requires a wait.

    Thanks for reading,

    Chico
  • Post #82 - October 12th, 2007, 3:40 pm
    Post #82 - October 12th, 2007, 3:40 pm Post #82 - October 12th, 2007, 3:40 pm
    imagine that.

    lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=13435&highlight=david+burkes
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #83 - October 13th, 2007, 12:00 pm
    Post #83 - October 13th, 2007, 12:00 pm Post #83 - October 13th, 2007, 12:00 pm
    I'm starving to death. This goes on the list.

    Thank you!
  • Post #84 - October 14th, 2007, 6:39 am
    Post #84 - October 14th, 2007, 6:39 am Post #84 - October 14th, 2007, 6:39 am
    Chico, thanks for that post. My 40day ribeye was spot-on as for mid-rare, as was my GF's bone-in filet. We were there on a Sunday so it wasn't hootin' and hollerin' but I can see where that might happen. Our server steered us away from the creamed spinach, so we got the leafy garlic spinach which was quite tasty!
    - Mark

    Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon? Ham? Pork chops?
    Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
    Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.
  • Post #85 - October 22nd, 2007, 7:39 am
    Post #85 - October 22nd, 2007, 7:39 am Post #85 - October 22nd, 2007, 7:39 am
    I went to Primehouse this weekend, and thought I would throw in my two cents about the meal.

    First, the room was adequately "hip" for whom I consider their ideal clientele. In fact, possibly my favorite moment of the entire meal was seeing the group of about 12 little girls, ages 6-8 or so, having a birthday party dinner at Primehouse. They were all done up in boots and berets, and one little 7 year old was on the cell phone half the time (I imagined she was calling one of her other girlfriends: “You wouldn’t believe it – Julie is wearing the same old gauche shoes again and has made a fool of herself by drinking 3 glasses of WHOLE milk!”).

    Service was good, although perhaps a little slow. They were out of a wine we ordered, and although the sommelier was supposed to come over and help pick another wine, that did not happen until long after we picked another one on our own.

    But now onto the good stuff – the food. I did enjoy the big popover that acts as the bread course – I could eat those with every meal. The appetizers were generally excellent. The sashimi Kobe beef was outstanding, with dehydrated mushroom chips and truffle cream really enhancing an already exquisite flavor of the beef. The Caesar salad was done very well, and the white anchovies were perfect. There was also a salmon and tuna tartar that was very nice, and which could be mixed with one of three different sauces.

    For my entrée, I had the 40 day aged ribeye (medium rare, perhaps more on the rare side). I am no steak connoisseur, but it did have a great crust and a nice little tang (and I think it was Mike G’s great tip to save the truffle cream from the appetizer to use on the steak if you want). The South Side Filet was very good, but I did prefer the ribeye (the filet was supposed to be medium/medium rare, but because it was so rare, it tasted slightly like prime rib to me). The sides we had were the hash browns (good crust, although the flavor was little lacking), the polenta with mascarpone (very good, although perhaps a bit sweet), and the tempura stringbeans (just what you would expect from the name). We were too full for dessert.

    Overall I would say it was a very good meal and if I ever want to take someone to a steakhouse, I think this restaurant would be at the top of my list. Additionally, if I ever wanted drinks and an appetizer somewhere, I would come back here in a heartbeat.
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #86 - October 22nd, 2007, 8:21 am
    Post #86 - October 22nd, 2007, 8:21 am Post #86 - October 22nd, 2007, 8:21 am
    David Burkes was on the top of my list of places to try, & we are going to be dining there the first week of December to sample their dry aged beef.

    They have alot to live up to, since I had the best steak i have ever eaten in September when we visited Saloon Steakhouse, and had the 21 day dry aged K.C. strip. As I mentioned above the best steak i have ever eaten.

    The decision to take a first trip to David Burkes narrowly beat out a return trip to Joes Seafood, Prime Steaks, and Stone Crab, it was a tough decision, especailly now that the stone crabs are in season.

    I am looking forward to David Burke's I hope they live up to my expectations.
  • Post #87 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:04 am
    Post #87 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:04 am Post #87 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:04 am
    jimswside wrote:The decision to take a first trip to David Burkes narrowly beat out a return trip to Joes Seafood, Prime Steaks, and Stone Crab, it was a tough decision, especailly now that the stone crabs are in season.


    I am firmly in the camp that likes David Burke's Steakhouse. On the other hand, good dry aged beef isn't really seasonal...
  • Post #88 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:10 am
    Post #88 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:10 am Post #88 - October 22nd, 2007, 10:10 am
    stagger,

    Good point, I always figured I have until May to get some more of those great fresh stone crab claws @ Joe's, that and I wanted to try somewhere new, that put David Burkes as the no brainer choice for our next "special" meal out in Chicago.
  • Post #89 - October 22nd, 2007, 3:55 pm
    Post #89 - October 22nd, 2007, 3:55 pm Post #89 - October 22nd, 2007, 3:55 pm
    First, let me say that I'm a big fan. The dry aged beef is great. The bone-in, lightly aged filet is a nice "lighter" option. They're not doing anyone any favors price-wise on the wine list, but they have some nice options on there that you don't see every day (try the Turley sometime, I do whenever my step-dad is buying :). My wife loves the tuna, halibut and martinis. It's actually become our "go to" option when we want to do the steakhouse thing.

    Second, having said all that, I, like a reviewer from a few days back, have hit on one or two off meals there. The popovers were too hard, the steak was the wrong temperature, etc. I suppose if you go anyplace often enough you'll hit a bad meal or two, but at a nice steakhouse, consistency in preparation doesn't seem to be too much to ask for.

    Now that I've kvetched, however, my reason for sharing is really to say to the one or two people I've noticed who have expressed disappointment with their meals, you may want to give it one more shot. I've enjoyed my good meals there enough that I've overlooked the one or two misses. It is certainly possible that I simply enjoy the food here more than those who wrote negative reviews, but it is also possible you caught one of those slightly off nights.
  • Post #90 - November 2nd, 2007, 12:38 pm
    Post #90 - November 2nd, 2007, 12:38 pm Post #90 - November 2nd, 2007, 12:38 pm
    We went last night, Thursday, later in the evening (9pm) and saw no evidence of wandering beer drinkers in t-shirts ;) BUT! I could see how that might happen, since there is a bar outside the restaurant - between the restaurant and the hotel - so if you were waiting in the bar, having a beer, before your table was called in...

    Anyway, most of the tables seemed to be groups of men, perhaps business dinners? It was not rowdy.

    The hit of the evening was the popover, though mine was a little burnt. One of us asked for a second popover, and they said "Sure!" and even asked if all of the rest of us wanted more of them. I think I would have preferred them with the steaks, because I wanted to save room, and was hungry, so I ate it all up :) The sides were fine, though my onion rings were cold when they arrived. They would have been quite good if they had been hot (no, I didn't send them back).

    I had the 40-day rib eye, which was good. The texture was very nice, it was done exactly to order, and it had a good flavor. I would have preferred a juicier steak, so perhaps I am not a fan of the aging - which I understand produces a less juicy steak? I didn't get a chance to ask my dining companions about how much they loved it, or what they though. Two of them split one rib eye (20 oz) and the servers didn't have any problem with that. They even did the splitting at the table for us.

    I'm not sure I'd rush back, but I did enjoy myself. I can't say how it compares to other steak houses for dinner, since I haven't been to too many others recently.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org

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