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David Burke's Primehouse - Yowsa!

David Burke's Primehouse - Yowsa!
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  • Post #301 - March 29th, 2012, 9:20 am
    Post #301 - March 29th, 2012, 9:20 am Post #301 - March 29th, 2012, 9:20 am
    My memory is that they were dry aging it for about two weeks, at least when they opened. Maybe they've stopped, or maybe it's only a some-time special.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #302 - March 29th, 2012, 11:34 am
    Post #302 - March 29th, 2012, 11:34 am Post #302 - March 29th, 2012, 11:34 am
    gleam wrote:I mean, you can cut a bone-in tenderloin. Primehouse does, and then dry ages it.

    Out of curiosity, do you happen to know what it is about the process that requires the cut to be bone-in?


    Ed,

    You need the bone and fat to protect the meat during the dry aging process...otherwise, the meat ages too fast and will "decompose", shriveling away to almost nothing.

    Some people like to dry age the primals and then cut boneless steaks, serving the steak boneless.
    "Bass Trombone is the Lead Trumpet of the Deep."
    Rick Hammett
  • Post #303 - March 29th, 2012, 11:41 am
    Post #303 - March 29th, 2012, 11:41 am Post #303 - March 29th, 2012, 11:41 am
    Makes sense, thanks!
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #304 - March 29th, 2012, 5:17 pm
    Post #304 - March 29th, 2012, 5:17 pm Post #304 - March 29th, 2012, 5:17 pm
    budrichard wrote:
    gleam wrote:I mean, you can cut a bone-in tenderloin. Primehouse does, and then dry ages it.

    Out of curiosity, do you happen to know what it is about the process that requires the cut to be bone-in?

    The menu ar Burke's does show a bone in tenderloin but not under the dry aged steaks and I don't recall seeing any bone in tenderloin aging at Burke's?-Dick
    The only way I know of too get a dry aged tenderloin would be to dry age a whole primal cut and then remove the tenderloin. Since the tenderloin is such a small in diameter piece of meat, the loss would be substantial which is probably why one doesn't encounter dry aged tenderloin.


    budrichard,

    My meat supplier has customers who ask for their tenderloins to be cut from dry aged primals (short loin).

    So from a dry aged short loin, the following steaks can be cut:
    Porterhouse
    T-bone
    Bone in strips
    Boneless strips
    Bone in filets
    Boneless filets

    This is why you didn't see bone in filets aging at Burkes.
    "Bass Trombone is the Lead Trumpet of the Deep."
    Rick Hammett
  • Post #305 - March 30th, 2012, 8:01 am
    Post #305 - March 30th, 2012, 8:01 am Post #305 - March 30th, 2012, 8:01 am
    Evil Ronnie wrote:
    Only bone in cuts can be dry aged. Tenderloins can not be dry aged.


    I've heard you can dry age boneless tenderloin by dipping in tallow to protect the meat, but I don't have first hand experience with this.
  • Post #306 - May 26th, 2012, 10:08 am
    Post #306 - May 26th, 2012, 10:08 am Post #306 - May 26th, 2012, 10:08 am
    Another terrific meal for me at David Burke's last night, but if that was all that I had to report, I'd stay silent. I opted for the simple 40-day aged bone-in ribeye, medium rare, and it was delicious and cooked perfectly as usual. Service was also great, as usual.

    But a couple of new items to report: First, as some might have noticed, they have been doing some sort of pop-up ice cream shop on Fridays. I'm not sure exactly how this works and whether you can just take it on the go, but I was able to try one of the ice creams for my dessert last night. I opted for the strawberry-rhubarb pie ice cream and I have to say that it was one of the best ice creams I have ever tasted - flavor, texture both really unbelievable. The ice cream was so good I might just say that some might find it to be the new star of the show at DB's Primehouse. They had other ice creams on the menu that I'm sure they make in-house, but a Friday visit might expose you to some more interesting flavors I suspect.

    Another important note, I made the reservation on Opentable and got 1,000 points. Then this morning I received a follow-up email inviting me to make a reservation within the next five days (but for a reservation within the next two months) to receive 20% off the food portion of the bill. Looks like I'll be returning soon. :D
  • Post #307 - May 27th, 2012, 11:57 am
    Post #307 - May 27th, 2012, 11:57 am Post #307 - May 27th, 2012, 11:57 am
    BR wrote:Another important note, I made the reservation on Opentable and got 1,000 points.


    Bummer, I booked a table for Tuesday (29th) and got no such deal. But I am looking forward to the aged ribeye :-)
  • Post #308 - May 27th, 2012, 12:07 pm
    Post #308 - May 27th, 2012, 12:07 pm Post #308 - May 27th, 2012, 12:07 pm
    edb60035 wrote:
    BR wrote:Another important note, I made the reservation on Opentable and got 1,000 points.


    Bummer, I booked a table for Tuesday (29th) and got no such deal. But I am looking forward to the aged ribeye :-)

    If you book on Opentable, it's just a matter of days and times . . . you can always recheck to see if 1,000 point deal is available, even at a different time. Also, you may still get the repeat visit offer of 20%.
  • Post #309 - January 30th, 2013, 10:55 am
    Post #309 - January 30th, 2013, 10:55 am Post #309 - January 30th, 2013, 10:55 am
    So, was considering going to Primehouse for lunch, and took a look at their restaurant week menu. Am I missing something, or is their dinner menu exactly the same as the lunch menu, except at double the price? Are the portions larger? How does that work with the burger?
    "I've always thought pastrami was the most sensuous of the salted cured meats."
  • Post #310 - January 30th, 2013, 12:30 pm
    Post #310 - January 30th, 2013, 12:30 pm Post #310 - January 30th, 2013, 12:30 pm
    Independent George wrote:So, was considering going to Primehouse for lunch, and took a look at their restaurant week menu. Am I missing something, or is their dinner menu exactly the same as the lunch menu, except at double the price? Are the portions larger? How does that work with the burger?

    My guess is, it's a mistake. (Especially since, IIRC, they don't normally have the burger on their dinner menu, except in the bar.) I'd suggest phoning the restaurant for clarification.
  • Post #311 - January 31st, 2013, 6:26 am
    Post #311 - January 31st, 2013, 6:26 am Post #311 - January 31st, 2013, 6:26 am
    What you linked to was the Restaurant Week Menu. I would go to the website and look at steak prices.
    A steak is a steak is a steak which would be the only reason I would go to Burke's.
    Anything else is superfluous. Get the 28 Day rib eye. $46. That's all you need.
    The steak is great!-Dick
  • Post #312 - January 31st, 2013, 10:44 am
    Post #312 - January 31st, 2013, 10:44 am Post #312 - January 31st, 2013, 10:44 am
    budrichard wrote:What you linked to was the Restaurant Week Menu. I would go to the website and look at steak prices.
    A steak is a steak is a steak which would be the only reason I would go to Burke's.
    Anything else is superfluous. Get the 28 Day rib eye. $46. That's all you need.
    The steak is great!-Dick


    I've been to Primehouse, and I love it. The problem is, if I eat a whole ribeye for lunch, I'll be curled up at my desk, unconscious, while I'm supposed to be working. I was just asking because something didn't add up with the RW dinner menu. I agree with nsxtasy that it's likely just a simple mistake - I can ask about it if/when I get there.
    "I've always thought pastrami was the most sensuous of the salted cured meats."
  • Post #313 - February 1st, 2013, 9:51 am
    Post #313 - February 1st, 2013, 9:51 am Post #313 - February 1st, 2013, 9:51 am
    Split one?-Dick
  • Post #314 - January 30th, 2014, 4:41 pm
    Post #314 - January 30th, 2014, 4:41 pm Post #314 - January 30th, 2014, 4:41 pm
    It had been a few years since I ate at DB's, due to what I thought was half-assed quality during a Restaurant Week lunch at that time.

    We decided to give them another chance today.

    The tomato bisque with lump crab was excellent, especially with the always-stellar complimentary popover. We both went with the 40-day dry-aged burger, as all lunchtime steak option were only part of the upgrade list. The burger was served with generous two-person dishes of truffle fries, mashed potatoes, and sauteed mushrooms. Dessert was three small portions of a toasted marshmallow chocolate cake, chocolate ice cream, and a cheesecake lollipop.

    I'm quite please to report that the quality was top notch this time. Portions were very good (almost too much with the sides), and the burger was a perfect medium rare, as opposed to well-done and skimpy size last time. The burger could have used a little more salt on the crust, but that is a minor quibble.

    At $22, not including drinks, tax, tip, it was a most excellent value. As the $44 dinner menu was very similar, except for the option of a filet, your best value bet for a burger meal is at lunchtime.
  • Post #315 - March 4th, 2014, 9:17 am
    Post #315 - March 4th, 2014, 9:17 am Post #315 - March 4th, 2014, 9:17 am
    Hit DBPH last night for SueF's birthday.
    Service was impeccable, food delicious: 40-day bone-in ribeye for her, I had the special 35-day Delmonico. Hers came out much better, mainly for being thicker (better char). I didn't notice that the bone itself added much, but she didn't finish the part by the bone, so we get to try it tonight as leftovers.

    Drinks: SueF had a 2009 Rioja Vega Tempranillo which was truly awesome. I had the "Autumn Orchard" cocktail: Pear-infused Templeton Rye, Calvados, ginger liqueur. Hit my sweet tooth, the Rye paired nicely with the steak and the ginger cut the richness of the meal.

    For starters we had the bacon sticks (maple syrup and black pepper condiments, very smoky and meaty cubes), and tableside Caesar salad (perfectly done), sides were the creamed spinach (very good, my favorite steakhouse side) and roasted mushrooms (excellent deep flavor, although a little dry).

    Dessert was labeled creme brulee, but it was accompanied by a foie and brandied cherry brioche french toast, Ghana chocolate sorbet, more brandied cherries, and a couple chocolate spheres that just dissolved in the mouth. The creme brulee itself was about the richest custard I've ever had, sweet, creamy and dense.

    Wonderful meal, but it doesn't thrill me the way an exotic ethnic dinner will. Top-end steak to me is only a little better than merely very good steak. It was a special occasion, but I'm not likely to do it again any time soon.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #316 - March 11th, 2014, 1:22 pm
    Post #316 - March 11th, 2014, 1:22 pm Post #316 - March 11th, 2014, 1:22 pm
    Ventured to Primehouse for lunch today. Full disclosure: my lunch was comped as I was researching their private dining options. We shared the crab cake and bacon sticks. The crab cake is definitely an interesting prep. Tasty and pretty. ;-) The bacon was fantastic. Big cubes of smokey bacon dipped in maple syrup, served on sticks with a dipping sauce. There was one left that I will enjoy tomorrow. For my entree, I had the steak salad (207L marinated filet, arugula, maytag blue cheese, baby tomatoes, red onion, balsamic vinaigrette). The filet, cooked a touch over the requested medium rare, was cut into pieces and served over the rest of the ingredients. The steak had great flavor and having it in a salad was the best way for me to have steak without going into food coma later.

    After lunch, I got a tour of the cooler where they age the steaks. That was pretty interesting! We were going to go before lunch, but were advised that it's better to do it after as to not have the funky smell of the room ruin one's appetite. I could see that.

    I'm curious if anyone has been to Jimmy, the "secret bar" behind Burke's Bacon Bar.
    -Mary
  • Post #317 - March 11th, 2014, 2:59 pm
    Post #317 - March 11th, 2014, 2:59 pm Post #317 - March 11th, 2014, 2:59 pm
    The GP wrote:I'm curious if anyone has been to Jimmy, the "secret bar" behind Burke's Bacon Bar.


    This nauseating bit from an eater article convinced me to never go there:

    Jimmy, which isn't marketed to hotel or restaurant guests, is as much about the atmosphere as it's about the drinks. Brazil, who you last saw at Drumbar, is charged with "curating the clientele," which he calls "the next wave."

    "This is not about bottle service or the celebrity thing," he says, "atmosphere is more important. If you know about it that means you should, if you don't know about it that means you shouldn't."


    Link


    I'm sure I could get in, but :roll:
  • Post #318 - March 11th, 2014, 4:22 pm
    Post #318 - March 11th, 2014, 4:22 pm Post #318 - March 11th, 2014, 4:22 pm
    The GP wrote:The bacon was fantastic. Big cubes of smokey bacon dipped in maple syrup, served on sticks with a dipping sauce.

    As pictured here.
  • Post #319 - March 12th, 2014, 7:53 am
    Post #319 - March 12th, 2014, 7:53 am Post #319 - March 12th, 2014, 7:53 am
    nsxtasy wrote:
    The GP wrote:The bacon was fantastic. Big cubes of smokey bacon dipped in maple syrup, served on sticks with a dipping sauce.

    As pictured here.

    Not anymore. They are currently serving them as big cubes -- 1 to 1 1/2 inches in size - on skewers served standing up. Sorry, no pic as it was a business lunch.
    -Mary
  • Post #320 - March 12th, 2014, 9:23 am
    Post #320 - March 12th, 2014, 9:23 am Post #320 - March 12th, 2014, 9:23 am
    The GP wrote:
    nsxtasy wrote:
    The GP wrote:The bacon was fantastic. Big cubes of smokey bacon dipped in maple syrup, served on sticks with a dipping sauce.

    As pictured here.

    Not anymore. They are currently serving them as big cubes -- 1 to 1 1/2 inches in size - on skewers served standing up.

    Huh? Sure sounds like a perfect description of the photo of Burke's bacon in the link:

    Image
  • Post #321 - March 12th, 2014, 9:25 am
    Post #321 - March 12th, 2014, 9:25 am Post #321 - March 12th, 2014, 9:25 am
    nsxtasy wrote:Huh? Sure sounds like a perfect description of the photo of Burke's bacon in the link:

    Image

    This photo doesn't immediately come up if you click the link. It's actually the second picture down on the screen and needs to be scrolled to. The one that immediately appears is of some bacon slices, hence the confusion.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #322 - March 12th, 2014, 9:31 am
    Post #322 - March 12th, 2014, 9:31 am Post #322 - March 12th, 2014, 9:31 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:This photo doesn't immediately come up if you click the link. It's actually the second picture down on the screen and needs to be scrolled to. The one that immediately appears is of some bacon slices, hence the confusion.

    That's correct. The Zagat article consists of a slide show, with the photos of the individual restaurants such as Burke's shown as the second photo on the page, below the overview paragraph and photo (which is from slide #4, Benny's Chop House).
  • Post #323 - June 19th, 2014, 8:17 am
    Post #323 - June 19th, 2014, 8:17 am Post #323 - June 19th, 2014, 8:17 am
    Man, this bacon is delicious. We stopped by Jimmy for a drink (I think the pretension has died down a bit, as it seemed pretty casual when we were there). Cocktails were great, but we were a touch hungry so ordered some bacon. Holy hell. I have had dreams about that bacon since I was there, and I'm counting the minutes until I head back there for some more. S6 cocktail and that bacon - great 1-2.
  • Post #324 - June 19th, 2014, 10:12 am
    Post #324 - June 19th, 2014, 10:12 am Post #324 - June 19th, 2014, 10:12 am
    My brother had the 40 day dry-aged prime burger last Friday. Said it was easily one of the best burgers he's ever had.
  • Post #325 - June 20th, 2014, 12:33 pm
    Post #325 - June 20th, 2014, 12:33 pm Post #325 - June 20th, 2014, 12:33 pm
    I have no idea what this portents for Burke's Prime House?-Dick
    http://ny.eater.com/tags/david-burke
  • Post #326 - June 20th, 2014, 1:33 pm
    Post #326 - June 20th, 2014, 1:33 pm Post #326 - June 20th, 2014, 1:33 pm
    If any personnel change were to have an impact, it would be Rick Gresh who left to join Virgin Hotels a few weeks ago. I'm guessing little will change though, at least in the short term.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #327 - June 20th, 2014, 3:09 pm
    Post #327 - June 20th, 2014, 3:09 pm Post #327 - June 20th, 2014, 3:09 pm
    There's also this:

    David Burke's Grillhouse Coming to Schaumburg

    and this:

    David Burke Planning Two More Restaurants; Pushes Back Another
  • Post #328 - June 26th, 2014, 9:32 am
    Post #328 - June 26th, 2014, 9:32 am Post #328 - June 26th, 2014, 9:32 am
    I recently treated one of my best friends to David Burke's for his bachelor party. He had been before, about a year ago, and it was my first time. Unfortunately I thought the meal was an overall bad value and he agreed that the place had gone downhill.

    Our table ordered 28-, 40- and 55-day medium-rare ribeyes to compare, but seeing as two of our steaks came back medium a true comparison was impossible. When asked about it, the waiter told us that their steaks will have a drier texture because of the aging process and did not offer a solution. OK, whatever, it's a celebration so we'll let it go. Aside from overcooking the steaks tasted good, I guess. But for at least $50 per steak they should taste better than just "good".

    The sides were a mixed bag. Half the popovers came out fresh and hot while the other half were cold. Dumplings had a chewy, dense texture like bad frozen pierogies, while the wagyu hot dogs were unpleasantly greasy and mushy. On the other hand the roasted asparagus spears and sautéed mushrooms were cooked to the perfect doneness, unlike most overcooked steakhouse vegetable sides. Bacon skewers were delicious, but come on it's bacon dipped in maple syrup, how could that be bad.

    Drink pours were generous, so no complaints there.

    David Burke's is not a bad restaurant, just a bad value. If I had paid $40 for this steak dinner I would have walked away happy. At over $100 a head, no amount of booze in my martini could make up for the dinner's low points.
  • Post #329 - February 15th, 2017, 2:10 pm
    Post #329 - February 15th, 2017, 2:10 pm Post #329 - February 15th, 2017, 2:10 pm
    David Burke's name off Primehouse in James Hotel

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/ ... ames-hotel
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #330 - November 28th, 2017, 6:38 am
    Post #330 - November 28th, 2017, 6:38 am Post #330 - November 28th, 2017, 6:38 am
    After 11 years, the steakhouse inside The James Hotel — the restaurant that once employed celebrity chef David Burke — is closing. Primehouse will serve its last dry-aged steak on Saturday, December 9 in River North.

    https://chicago.eater.com/2017/11/27/16 ... go-closing
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard

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