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Where in the city can I get a 63 degree egg?

Where in the city can I get a 63 degree egg?
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  • Where in the city can I get a 63 degree egg?

    Post #1 - September 18th, 2010, 8:58 am
    Post #1 - September 18th, 2010, 8:58 am Post #1 - September 18th, 2010, 8:58 am
    Does anyone know a restaurant that has a 63 degree egg on the menu?
  • Post #2 - September 18th, 2010, 9:07 am
    Post #2 - September 18th, 2010, 9:07 am Post #2 - September 18th, 2010, 9:07 am
    I believe the one hour egg at Longman and Eagle or the egg at Chizakaya would meet your criterion. I've not been to Chizakaya and it seems as though the egg is generally used in conjunction with other ingredients.

    Chizakaya
    3056 N. Lincoln Ave.
    Chicago, IL 60657
    p 773 697 4725

    Longman and Eagle
    2657 N. Kedzie Ave
    Chicago, IL.
    773-276-7110
  • Post #3 - September 19th, 2010, 9:34 am
    Post #3 - September 19th, 2010, 9:34 am Post #3 - September 19th, 2010, 9:34 am
    What is a 63 degree egg?
  • Post #4 - September 19th, 2010, 9:38 am
    Post #4 - September 19th, 2010, 9:38 am Post #4 - September 19th, 2010, 9:38 am
    local597 wrote:What is a 63 degree egg?

    This guy I found via Google wrote:At 63-degrees Celsius, egg whites are just barely set and the yolks have a pudding-like consistency. To achieve this goal, eggs are cooked in a 63C waterbath for about an hour. The precision is important because at 65C, according Harold McGee, the egg whites become “tender solid” as opposed just barely set at 63C.
  • Post #5 - September 19th, 2010, 10:27 am
    Post #5 - September 19th, 2010, 10:27 am Post #5 - September 19th, 2010, 10:27 am
    They have a sous vide egg yolk served with the steak tartare at Gilt Bar.
  • Post #6 - September 19th, 2010, 3:28 pm
    Post #6 - September 19th, 2010, 3:28 pm Post #6 - September 19th, 2010, 3:28 pm
    thanks KHO!
  • Post #7 - September 20th, 2010, 10:46 am
    Post #7 - September 20th, 2010, 10:46 am Post #7 - September 20th, 2010, 10:46 am
    Khaopaat wrote:
    local597 wrote:What is a 63 degree egg?

    This guy I found via Google wrote:At 63-degrees Celsius, egg whites are just barely set and the yolks have a pudding-like consistency. To achieve this goal, eggs are cooked in a 63C waterbath for about an hour. The precision is important because at 65C, according Harold McGee, the egg whites become “tender solid” as opposed just barely set at 63C.


    FWIW, 63C is about 145F. I think these eggs are done at 63F rather than 63C.
  • Post #8 - September 20th, 2010, 10:58 am
    Post #8 - September 20th, 2010, 10:58 am Post #8 - September 20th, 2010, 10:58 am
    No. They're done at 63C.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #9 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am
    Post #9 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am Post #9 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am
    With enough notice, I bet they can
    do a 63 degree (K) egg at Moto.
    A little liquid hydrogen would make
    any dish that much more refreshing.
  • Post #10 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am
    Post #10 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am Post #10 - September 20th, 2010, 11:13 am
    mrbrowncanmoo wrote:I think these eggs are done at 63F rather than 63C.


    63F would be like taking an egg out of the refrigerator and letting it come nearly to room temperature before eating it. Unless his name is Rocky Balboa, I don't think that's what the OP had in mind.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #11 - September 21st, 2010, 9:54 am
    Post #11 - September 21st, 2010, 9:54 am Post #11 - September 21st, 2010, 9:54 am
    SCUBAchef wrote:With enough notice, I bet they can
    do a 63 degree (K) egg at Moto.
    A little liquid hydrogen would make
    any dish that much more refreshing.


    I enjoyed the 63 degree egg at Moto's sister restaurant, Otom. It was lovely.

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