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Pie-Eyed Pizza
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  • Pie-Eyed Pizza

    Post #1 - October 13th, 2004, 10:53 am
    Post #1 - October 13th, 2004, 10:53 am Post #1 - October 13th, 2004, 10:53 am
    D'Agostino's had better watch its back! There's a scrappy upstart in town.

    Pie-Eyed just opened around the corner and the pizza shows great promise.

    The first thing you notice when you walk in is the paucity of tables and chairs. Instead, a 12-inch counter lines the walls. This is stand-up pizza New York style.

    On to the slice: As I said, the pizza shows great promise. The dough is the perfect consistency in my book--not too thin and not too thick, just the right combination of yeasty doughy-ness and crispness. What is lacking is this: a tad more oil and salt. It's simply too plain at this point.

    I talked to the owners who solicited my comments. They were open to experimenting with the salt/oil ratios and readily conceded that the dough is an ongoing work-in-progress.

    The ingredients are first-rate. I had a fresh mushroom and green pepper slice.

    Notice too the hours. For some reason I see myself stumbling out of The Matchbox and heading straight here.

    What cheers me is this: You don't have to be drunk to appreciate their slices.

    Pie-Eyed Pizzeria
    1111 W. Chicago (at Milwaukee)
    312-CHEESE.5 (312-243-3735)
    M-Th 11:00 a.m.--Midnight
    Friday 5:00 p.m.--5:00 a.m.
    Saturday 6:00 p.m.--6:00 a.m.
    Sunday Closed
  • Post #2 - October 13th, 2004, 3:59 pm
    Post #2 - October 13th, 2004, 3:59 pm Post #2 - October 13th, 2004, 3:59 pm
    You're spot on in regards to the crust. Pretty close to great, but a tad bit too plain. I was very pleased with the generous amount of sauce and moreover how good the sauce tastes. A little too much cheese and it was pretty burnt so I couldn't really taste it that well. But overall, I'd say this place is definitely worth checking out.
  • Post #3 - October 30th, 2004, 7:29 pm
    Post #3 - October 30th, 2004, 7:29 pm Post #3 - October 30th, 2004, 7:29 pm
    I live a block from both and walk by every day on the way to the blue line. I like the sauce better at Dags but the crust is far better FOR A SLICE ON THE GO at Pie Eyed. In my book there is a big difference between a pizza place that sells slices and a place where you'd order a pie for home. I order Dags all the time but I would never go there for a slice, the slices are never ready, you have to wait--they're not set up for the walk in slice business.

    Pie-Eyed always has three pizza going at a time and they give a nice big slice that you can handle while walkling, cheese is usually more well done and it holds up while travelling if you cant eat there.

    One thing, the crust does not allow you to fold it over like a NY slice. I am not sure if thats positive or negative. Overall I like the place.
  • Post #4 - November 1st, 2004, 1:47 pm
    Post #4 - November 1st, 2004, 1:47 pm Post #4 - November 1st, 2004, 1:47 pm
    I placed a pick-up order from Pie-Eyed last week. Went with a large pan pizza with tomato and spinach. I will say it is some of the better pan pizza I have had in some time. Close in quality to Art of Pizza pan pizza but tough to compare since my normal Art of Pizza pan has Italian beef and giardinera on it. Pie-Eyed was very generous on the sauce, which was nice on a pan pizza especially since their sauce has a great fresh flavor to it. Only issue I can say is that I needed to put a good dose of salt on it, which I normally do not do. That could be due to the fact of my rather bland topping choices though as well. Having added sausage/pepperoni could have changed the whole dynamic.
    When I was waiting for my pie I was tempted to try a slice of their regular crust pizza, as they all looked really tasty. Next time I suppose.
    Oh another positive in their favor is they seem to brown their cheese a bit more than many places do. I hope this is a method rather than a fluke as I like slightly browned cheese. Who doesn't actually???
    Jamie
  • Post #5 - November 1st, 2004, 10:04 pm
    Post #5 - November 1st, 2004, 10:04 pm Post #5 - November 1st, 2004, 10:04 pm
    Hi all.

    This is Pie-Eyed Pizzeria. Thanks for the great comments -- much appreciated!

    Yes, we're still tinkering with the dough a bit. It takes a bit to perfect the homemade pizza receipe on the monster-sized commercial equipment. We still think it's pretty darn good.

    It's no mistake that we do our cheese on the thins a little well done. We've always hated pizza that's a big ol' glop of cheese. You put it in your mouth and it's like sucking on an egg of Silly Putty. Then you try to talk and it falls out and you embarrass yourself on your first date with that special person who could've been "The One". C'mon -- we've all been there!

    Anyway, check out our website @ http://www.pie-eyedpizzeria.com . You can sign up for our mailing list to get coupons and stuff sent to your inbox. You can also check out the menu and download coupons.

    We're trying to start up deliveries as soon as possible. We should be taking credit cards in the next couple of weeks or so. Look for the tell-tale MasterCard/Visa stickers on the door or check the website.

    See you soon, Chicago!

    -= Pie-Eyed Pizzeria =-
  • Post #6 - November 2nd, 2004, 12:53 am
    Post #6 - November 2nd, 2004, 12:53 am Post #6 - November 2nd, 2004, 12:53 am
    Jamieson22,

    Italian beef and giardinera pizza,really?Say it is so!
  • Post #7 - November 2nd, 2004, 1:13 am
    Post #7 - November 2nd, 2004, 1:13 am Post #7 - November 2nd, 2004, 1:13 am
    hattyn wrote:Jamieson22,

    Italian beef and giardinera pizza,really?Say it is so!


    I'm a huge fan of giardinera on pizza too. It's really a great topping, although I usually get it with sausage or pepperoni. Banana peppers are a decent substitute if giard isn't available.

    Having had pepperoni+banana peppers from piece and pepperoni+giard from d'agostino's, I'd take d'agostinos again and again.

    of course, the one time I had italian beef on a pizza (a chicago style deep dish where I ordered black olives and they entered in 'B', which ended up being beef), it was horrid. ah well. perhaps a gyro pizza is next. gyro meat, feta, kalamata olives and onion?

    -ed
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #8 - November 3rd, 2004, 4:43 pm
    Post #8 - November 3rd, 2004, 4:43 pm Post #8 - November 3rd, 2004, 4:43 pm
    Oggi's sells an italian beef and giardinera pizza they call the "picante." It's pretty darn good.

    Oggi's
    1378 W Grand Ave
    Chicago, IL 60622
    312-733-0442
  • Post #9 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:02 pm
    Post #9 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:02 pm Post #9 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:02 pm
    Hattyn-
    Yep, italian beef and giardinera pizza is a delite for me. To tell you the truth I only really have ever had it at Art of Pizza in their pan pizza but they do something magic with it (probably ordered it 10 times or so). Seems the perfect blend of beef and giardinera so that it is not too salty nor oily.
    It really is quite a treat and worth a try though I can't vouch for it anywhere but from Art of Pizza.
    Ona side note, since I moved out of Art of Pizza delivery range a year ago when I moved to my new condo I have pretty much survived on Oggi pizza for quality (usually Mahgerita), Bacci Pizza for quantity (Large, cheap, fast delivery, with sausage), and John's when I feel like something greasy and to me way too expensive but still evily delicious (aka The Roman).. When Pie-Eyed starts delivery this could cause a conflict with Oggi. I love pizza conflicts :)
    Jamie
  • Post #10 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:27 pm
    Post #10 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:27 pm Post #10 - November 3rd, 2004, 5:27 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:Ona side note, since I moved out of Art of Pizza delivery range a year ago when I moved to my new condo I have pretty much survived on Oggi pizza for quality (usually Mahgerita), Bacci Pizza for quantity (Large, cheap, fast delivery, with sausage), and John's when I feel like something greasy and to me way too expensive but still evily delicious (aka The Roman).. When Pie-Eyed starts delivery this could cause a conflict with Oggi.Jamie


    Jamieson22,

    Do you find John's generally expensive, or just their "Roman?"

    And another question: Have you tried Barcello's, just north of Red Hen Bakery? I tell fans of John's that it is somewhat comparable.

    OK, just one last question: Have you tried a baked panzerotti at Bacci? Personally, I don't care for their pies, but I regularly enjoy one of their panzerotti with sausage, spinach, and ricotta cheese. It doesn't hurt that I am two blocks away. [I am two blocks from Bella's, too, but there isn't anything that I enjoy at Bella's. ;)]

    Erik M.

    ps: check your mailbox...
  • Post #11 - November 3rd, 2004, 7:43 pm
    Post #11 - November 3rd, 2004, 7:43 pm Post #11 - November 3rd, 2004, 7:43 pm
    On Sunday after a weekend with far too little sleep I decided to give John's a try. Nothing terribly adventurous - just cheese and sausage on a thin crust.

    John's was quite good, but didn't have quite the crackery consistency I've been craving lately. It wasn't terribly expensive but I think I'd rather dine in for the full experience as suggested next time.

    What I discovered last night at a friend's that was much similar to what I've been into lately was the thin crust from My Pie. (The location on Damen & Armitage.) The crust wasn't piled with toppings to the edge, leading to a crisp & light crackery texture on the uncovered bits - with enough of a crunch on the covered bits to clear your mind of any idea that it might have gotten soggy.

    A few of us were sharing a large pie, I get the feeling that a smaller pizza would maintain the crunch even better through the middle.

    Speaking of the cracker-thin crust on pizza, I have to toss my vote for Moonshine in again. In fact, I'll be heading up there in a couple of hours. (The pizzas are 1/2 off on every other Wednesday as a tie-in with a promoter friend who brings in DJs. Loud music and more of a lounge/club vibe than a restaurant after 7pm or so.)

    As an aside I was noticing that Erik M. listed a lot of places quite close to home for me. Then it hit me - I remembered an email thread concerning apple cider on the lth email list last year. You live quite literally something like 300 feet from me, Erik.
    -Pete
  • Post #12 - November 3rd, 2004, 8:34 pm
    Post #12 - November 3rd, 2004, 8:34 pm Post #12 - November 3rd, 2004, 8:34 pm
    Pete wrote:On Sunday after a weekend with far too little sleep I decided to give John's a try. Nothing terribly adventurous - just cheese and sausage on a thin crust. John's was quite good, but didn't have quite the crackery consistency I've been craving lately.


    If you want to try something even more "crackery," and also quite close to home, give Barcello's a try. On the whole, I cannot say that I like it better than John's, as it seems to suffer from what I can only call the "too-thin-crust syndrome," much like the recently ballyhooed Candlelite. I find that these types of pies hold NO heat, and I cannot imagine anyone making it to a third square, or piece, and still finding it more than, say, room temp. Well, unless you've got some two-fisted shoveling technique that frightens small children and adults alike. ;)

    While I'm talking Candlelite, and in light of my main gripe about these super-crackery pies, I should add that those eleveted pizza pan holders that pizza places use do nothing but exacerbate this "problem," by encouraging the ciruculation of air on the underside of the pie pan.

    Pete wrote:What I discovered last night at a friend's that was much similar to what I've been into lately was the thin crust from My Pie.


    I've said this over on Chowhound, but I think it bears repeating: My Pie is my dialing destination for dish pie, in the neighbourhood. I order a "half-baked," and when I finish it off in the oven at home, it is as good, or better, than schlepping out for dish pie. All things considered, of course.

    Do you enjoy dish pie, Pete?

    Pete wrote:Speaking of the cracker-thin crust on pizza, I have to toss my vote for Moonshine in again.


    I have yet to try it, but I intend to, very soon. Shannon has raved about their pizza a number of times.

    Pete wrote:As an aside I was noticing that Erik M. listed a lot of places quite close to home for me. Then it hit me - I remembered an email thread concerning apple cider on the lth email list last year. You live quite literally something like 300 feet from me, Erik.


    P.M. me, Pete, if you are interested. I may be getting some more cider, soon.

    Regards,
    Erik M.

    Barcello's Pizzaria Inc.
    1647 N. Milwaukee Ave.
    773.486.8444
    Last edited by Erik M. on November 3rd, 2004, 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #13 - November 3rd, 2004, 9:00 pm
    Post #13 - November 3rd, 2004, 9:00 pm Post #13 - November 3rd, 2004, 9:00 pm
    AS far as John's being expensive it just seems to me that due to such a thin crust you need to order a much larger size than normally needed. Figure a Roman can feed 3 but not stuff 3 people. I usually order double crust, but still seems a pizza from there pushes $28 delivered. That is a touch steep in my book.
    Bacci is the cheapest by far. Huge pizza that is quite filling for less than $20 delivered. Not the best pizza though but good when you need quantity and always shows up to me scalding hot since I live close. Have not tried the panzerotti, will try to soon.
    I have been to Barcello's once, but not sure I had pizza. Did remember liking whatever I had so will try again.
    Jamie
  • Post #14 - November 6th, 2004, 1:28 pm
    Post #14 - November 6th, 2004, 1:28 pm Post #14 - November 6th, 2004, 1:28 pm
    lukes beef out in the burbs makes a beautiful beef and giardiniera pizza that will burn your head off!!!
  • Post #15 - November 7th, 2004, 9:45 am
    Post #15 - November 7th, 2004, 9:45 am Post #15 - November 7th, 2004, 9:45 am
    I love giardinera on pizza also and as a frequent customer of D'Agostinos on Ogden, I would like to give the folks at Pie Eyed a tip. I stopped ordering giardinera on my pizza at Dags because it always made the pizza extra oily. I always have a jar of Bari giardinera at home anyway so I dry it with paper towel and add on to the pizza myself. Make sure you drain the giardinera very well so its almost dry when you put it on the pie, it should draw enough moisture from the cheese and sauce to rehydrate anyway. Can't wait for you to start delivery.
  • Post #16 - October 4th, 2005, 6:35 pm
    Post #16 - October 4th, 2005, 6:35 pm Post #16 - October 4th, 2005, 6:35 pm
    Well this is quite an old thread, but I figure this will allow for easier future searches.

    My wife and I tried Pie-Eyed tonight, and weren't that impressed. We ordered a 14" thin crust w/Tomato, Basil, and Sausage as well as an order of Jalapeno Cheddar Poppers. The poppers were OK, a decent example, not quite enough "pop" for my taste, and the cheese wasn't melted enough (that could have been the delivery time). The pizza itself, first it was cut into pieces not slices. I saw on menu that I could have ordered slices after the fact, but it was too late by then. The toppings were all pretty good: the basil was fresh, as were the tomato slices, the sausage had a good taste, but might have been a bit over cooked. The cheese and sauce were decent if not unremarkable. The fact that they weren't bad is a huge step up over the nationwide chains. Now of all of the above was put on a good crust, it would have made a good pizza, unfortunately it was placed on something that resembled a stale cracker. No good at all.

    Now I will give them another chance, and I will try the deep-dish and hope that that crust in an improvement, but I really wish they they offered a "normal" crust option.
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole
  • Post #17 - October 4th, 2005, 10:03 pm
    Post #17 - October 4th, 2005, 10:03 pm Post #17 - October 4th, 2005, 10:03 pm
    Headcase, you're new to town, so we'll give you the benefit of the doubt. But pizza is a religious issue in Chicago and you should be aware of that.

    Before you post another word on pizza, please do a search on this board and read all of the extensive material there is to be found on the pizza styles available in Chicago and Chicago pizza customs.

    Whining about pizza cut in squares is not a valid criticism. If you insist on ordering flat pizza, that's how it comes.
  • Post #18 - October 4th, 2005, 10:34 pm
    Post #18 - October 4th, 2005, 10:34 pm Post #18 - October 4th, 2005, 10:34 pm
    LAZ wrote:But pizza is a religious issue in Chicago and you should be aware of that.


    :) Of course, there are plenty of non-natives for whom it is not a religious issue who are just looking for good pizza.

    That said, I would heartily second LAZ's suggestion to take a look around the site and at least familiarize yourself with what the norms and expectations are around here, as it will help you contextualize your remarks if you wish to join the discussion. And you should join, because it's an enjoyable discussion.

    As with religion, though, I'd argue you're not going to win any converts by arguing dogma. :wink:

    Good luck.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #19 - October 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm
    Post #19 - October 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm Post #19 - October 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm
    LAZ wrote:Whining about pizza cut in squares is not a valid criticism. If you insist on ordering flat pizza, that's how it comes.


    On that note, I'd forwarn anyone new to deep dish to not be surprised if it arrives uncut at all.

    Many of the better places don't cut it, as the crust becomes less crisp during transit after it's sliced. I prefer mine uncut, and tend to request it as such.
    -Pete
  • Post #20 - October 5th, 2005, 5:58 am
    Post #20 - October 5th, 2005, 5:58 am Post #20 - October 5th, 2005, 5:58 am
    LAZ wrote:Whining about pizza cut in squares is not a valid criticism. If you insist on ordering flat pizza, that's how it comes.


    Hmmmm, I really didn't think I was whining about it. I just mentioned my mistake, and that I could have corrected it.

    If the crust was any good, the squares would not have bothered me, but it wasn't, so it did. If the "cracker crust" is a predominate style here, along with the deep dish, I can see myself eating a whole lot less pizza.

    As far as being new here, yes I am relatively. But I have been reading this forum for months before I ever actually registered. I have searched, how do you think I found this year old thread? I have read about the cracker crust style, which is something I have never tried before, and can safely say I won't again.
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole
  • Post #21 - October 5th, 2005, 6:16 am
    Post #21 - October 5th, 2005, 6:16 am Post #21 - October 5th, 2005, 6:16 am
    headcase wrote:I have read about the cracker crust style, which is something I have never tried before, and can safely say I won't again.

    Headcase,

    And that's why Baskin Robins makes 31-flavors of ice cream. :) While I like all styles of pizza, my preference is cracker thin crust, the crisper the better. I haven't tried Pie-Eyed, but I'm betting I would like the pizza.

    A couple of other places for thin, but not super thin, that I like are Vito and Nick's on the South Side, Marie's on Lawrence Ave and Candlelite. I had a pretty good pie last night at Romano's, but that's for those who really like thin and crisp.

    Zaffiro's in Milwaukee, Wisconsin is my benchmark.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Candlelite Chicago
    7452 North Western Ave
    Chicago, IL 60645
    773-465-0087

    Vito & Nick's
    8435 S Pulaski Rd
    Chicago
    773-735-2050

    Zaffiro's Pizza & Bar
    1724 N Farwell Ave
    Milwaukee, WI 53202
    414-289-8776

    Marie's Pizzeria
    4129 W Lawrence Ave
    Chicago, IL 60630
    773-725-1812
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #22 - October 5th, 2005, 6:29 am
    Post #22 - October 5th, 2005, 6:29 am Post #22 - October 5th, 2005, 6:29 am
    I was about to suggest that just maybe you didn't try a very good example of the regional style when GWiv posted all these addresses.

    While you're entitled to your opinion, shouldn't be browbeaten out of it, and could still feel the same way after a 50-stop eating tour of the entire city, it's also true that this is just the way pizza is here, making that, not a fluffier breadier crust a la New York "normal" here. So give a few others a try, who knows, you may grow to like some. Though it's also true that, hey, not everybody HAS to.
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  • Post #23 - October 5th, 2005, 7:46 am
    Post #23 - October 5th, 2005, 7:46 am Post #23 - October 5th, 2005, 7:46 am
    headcase wrote:If the crust was any good, the squares would not have bothered me, but it wasn't, so it did. If the "cracker crust" is a predominate style here, along with the deep dish, I can see myself eating a whole lot less pizza.

    As far as being new here, yes I am relatively. But I have been reading this forum for months before I ever actually registered. I have searched, how do you think I found this year old thread?

    Well, you haven't read enough if you refer to what you were served as somehow not "normal."

    I'm not a native, myself. I've been here a mere two decades, which, by some people's standards, hardly entitles me to have an opinion on pizza at all.
  • Post #24 - October 5th, 2005, 7:50 am
    Post #24 - October 5th, 2005, 7:50 am Post #24 - October 5th, 2005, 7:50 am
    Let's not attack the guy for having his own opinion. I think the point about "normal" pizza has been made. He has some guidance to other spots for the Chicago thin style that he might like better, if he wants them. He also just might not like it and that's that. It's been known to happen even among moderators here.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #25 - October 5th, 2005, 8:15 am
    Post #25 - October 5th, 2005, 8:15 am Post #25 - October 5th, 2005, 8:15 am
    Okay...being a non-fan of Chicago-style pizza I don't belong in a pizza discussion, so pardon the intrusion. But I wanted to add that American Flatbread in Waitsfield, VT (one of the best thin crust pies I've had in the US) is served in...gasp...squares! Yes, it is East Coast pie, yes it is round, and yes, they cut it into tiny squares similar to the way they cut thin crust here.

    Note to Whole Foods Shoppers: the pizzas you buy frozen don't compare to the pizzas made at the restaurant. But that's a discussion for another thread.
    CONNOISSEUR, n. A specialist who knows everything about something and nothing about anything else.
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  • Post #26 - October 5th, 2005, 8:23 am
    Post #26 - October 5th, 2005, 8:23 am Post #26 - October 5th, 2005, 8:23 am
    Aaron Deacon wrote:
    LAZ wrote:But pizza is a religious issue in Chicago and you should be aware of that.

    :) Of course, there are plenty of non-natives for whom it is not a religious issue who are just looking for good pizza.

    And perhaps it can be acknowledged that there's more than one religion too. :roll:

    headcase wrote:If the "cracker crust" is a predominate style here, along with the deep dish, I can see myself eating a whole lot less pizza.

    It is the style here and, as a Boston native myself, I've cut down on pizza a whole lot too. It's true that you've got to roll with what you've got, headcase, and while Chicago doesn't have some great Boston things like delis, pizza, and cheesesteaks, Boston doesn't have some great Chicago things like the dipped beef-sausage combo. (Aside from Boston's Chinatown -- Chicago's is good, just not quite as good -- and parts of Cambridge, Chicago has more and better ethnic options too.) You learn to adapt. It's been a while since there was any real street food experience like the Mil-Walk-athon last year, but if any happen, join in and you'll get a chance to find some great little hole-in-the-wall type places.

    And there are some places that make decent East Coast-style (the locals insist on referring to it as "New York") pizza, though I'm far enough from your 'hood that I can't really expect my sources to deliver that far. You might have to head up to Wicker Park -- those places are within your delivery area, I'm sure.
  • Post #27 - October 5th, 2005, 8:40 am
    Post #27 - October 5th, 2005, 8:40 am Post #27 - October 5th, 2005, 8:40 am
    As someone who's faith in Chicago pizza wears thin at times, I am in favor of more pizza discussion. In my tastings, and as someone who grew up in Chicago, eating a lot of great pizza over the years, I find that the ultra-crisp pizza cited above like Candlelite to be a) not exactly typical of Chicago pizza b) by far not the best pizza in Chicago (area).

    I think of the pizzas I have loved over the years, Tonelli's in Northbrook, Salerno's on Grand, Jimmy's in Forest Park, Jim and Pete's in Elmood Park, and best of all, Grand Slam in Chicago, and I think of nary a one-dimesional, brutally-brittle, crust.

    So, pizza orthodoxy is a hard thing to find around here!

    Rob
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #28 - October 5th, 2005, 9:05 am
    Post #28 - October 5th, 2005, 9:05 am Post #28 - October 5th, 2005, 9:05 am
    Besides a deep-dish Lou's with sausage, I'm with Gary. I'm a devotee of Chicago-style, square-cut, cracker-thin pizza.

    In addition to the excellent choices that Gary posted about, my move to a new neighborhood has introduced me to another.

    Limbo's, mentioned by Harry V. in this thread, is my new choice for delivery. The much-lauded Marie's is closer to us, but petit pois is not a fan of the greasiness and I'm lukewarm on their pizza in general.

    Limbo's, serves it up crispy cracker thin, with the right amount of cheese and toppings to satisfy me--not too heavy, not too light. They also have a pan and a stuffed which I'd like to try. Our first order was my standard mushroom-onion-jalapeno, which I don't think I'd order again based on their use of pickled jalapenos (I prefer them fresh on pizzas). Next time, we're definitely ordering a polish sausage and onion pizza. (Delivery is also friendly and prompt.)

    Petit pois did complain that the crust edges may have been a bit too dry for her taste, but it bother me at all and didn't detract from the fact that Limbo's is a neighborhood cracker-thin-crust that we can rely on.

    Limbo's Pizza
    4929 W Irving Park Rd
    (773) 481-0500

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #29 - October 5th, 2005, 9:16 am
    Post #29 - October 5th, 2005, 9:16 am Post #29 - October 5th, 2005, 9:16 am
    eatchicago wrote:Limbo's, mentioned by Harry V. in this thread, is my new choice for delivery.


    Let me know when you finally tackle The Beast.*

    E.M.

    * Limbo's claims to serve the "World's Largest Pizza." It is 28 inches in diameter, and the "Supreme" model costs $75. They estimate that it serves 15.
  • Post #30 - October 5th, 2005, 11:20 am
    Post #30 - October 5th, 2005, 11:20 am Post #30 - October 5th, 2005, 11:20 am
    LAZ wrote:
    headcase wrote:If the crust was any good, the squares would not have bothered me, but it wasn't, so it did. If the "cracker crust" is a predominate style here, along with the deep dish, I can see myself eating a whole lot less pizza.

    As far as being new here, yes I am relatively. But I have been reading this forum for months before I ever actually registered. I have searched, how do you think I found this year old thread?

    Well, you haven't read enough if you refer to what you were served as somehow not "normal."

    I'm not a native, myself. I've been here a mere two decades, which, by some people's standards, hardly entitles me to have an opinion on pizza at all.


    I was using normal as a position between cracker and deep dish, not as a reference to what Chicago considers normal for what is normal here, is far from what I consider normal.

    And I'm not forsaking the entire Chicago pizza culture because of that one pie. I'll give another couple of places a try, but it will be a long time before I give Pie-eyed's thin crust another shot.

    I'm sure that this has been raised before, but was the deep dish a direct counterpoint to the squares of cracker crust? I have read how the deep dish was supposed to raise the pizza from appetizer status. Now prior to the pizza the other night, I never considered pizza an appetizer, but if the cracker squares were around before the deep dish, the entire situation makes more sense to me.
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole

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