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And that's why you never procrastinate (Bonsoiree)

And that's why you never procrastinate (Bonsoiree)
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  • Post #91 - September 7th, 2007, 7:23 am
    Post #91 - September 7th, 2007, 7:23 am Post #91 - September 7th, 2007, 7:23 am
    I can tell you every single dish I've ever eaten at Lula


    Me too. And I can tell you what it needed...
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #92 - September 7th, 2007, 7:24 am
    Post #92 - September 7th, 2007, 7:24 am Post #92 - September 7th, 2007, 7:24 am
    Mike G wrote:
    I can tell you every single dish I've ever eaten at Lula


    Me too. And I can tell you what it needed...


    As I was typing that I thought, "I expect to see a pithy response from Mike G in an hour or so."
  • Post #93 - September 7th, 2007, 7:28 am
    Post #93 - September 7th, 2007, 7:28 am Post #93 - September 7th, 2007, 7:28 am
    42 minutes!
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #94 - October 7th, 2007, 3:27 pm
    Post #94 - October 7th, 2007, 3:27 pm Post #94 - October 7th, 2007, 3:27 pm
    Hello all,

    I just posted information about an event I have planned at Bonsoiree on November 10. Here's the link to the posting on the "Event" forum: http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=153903#153903.

    All the best,
    John
    John Danza
  • Post #95 - November 19th, 2007, 12:58 pm
    Post #95 - November 19th, 2007, 12:58 pm Post #95 - November 19th, 2007, 12:58 pm
    The Northern Illinois branch of the International Wine & Food Society held it's November dinner at Bonsoiree on Saturday night, November 10. In short, it was a tremendous evening. We had 27 people in attendance, so we took the entire restaurant for their 8pm seating. I chose the wines from the branch cellar and then Shin Thompson worked up a menu that paired well with each wine. Lastly, Shin and Kurt along with their team did a great job on the service, making for an evening to remember. Listed below is each course with its wine and a photo.

    The amuse was a scallop and a tomoto served in a spoon. Very well executed.

    Image

    The 1st course was lobster bisque with an oyster mushroom dumpling and some chive oil, paired with a 2003 Alvear Fino sherry. The bisque was rich and the bone dry sherry cut through it very well.

    Image

    The second and third courses were combined into a miniature surf and turf of tempura shrimp and braised pork belly, which was paired with the 2002 Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs Napa sparkling wine. The citrus of the wine went well with the sweetness of the shrimp and the salt of the pork.

    Image

    The fourth course was the slow cooked rabbit with sage gnocchi and natural jus monte beurre, served with a 2000 Schoffit Muscat from Alsace. You know this dish is good when my wife will eat rabbit. She finished before I did!

    Image

    The fifth course was pan roasted skate wing with a grilled polenta cake and charred tomato sauce, served with a 1999 Agapito Rico "Carchello" from Spain. The medium bodied red paired very well with the sweet, smokey tomato sauce. Sorry, no photo.

    The sixth course was the rosemary infused rack of lamb with green peppercorn risotto and a cherry lamb demi glace, paired with a 1998 Merryvale Vineyards Napa Cabernet Sauvignon. A classic pairing of lamb and cabernet, this evening it was spot on. The lamb was cooked perfectly medium rare and the risotto was very creamy.

    Image

    The dessert was their signature banana bread pudding with fresh berries and white chocolate creme anglaise, served with a 1993 Robert Weil Reisling Auslese from Germany. I asked that the bread pudding be served as it's a signature dish, and everyone raved about it. Two people who stated that they've never liked bread pudding loved it.

    Image

    Lastly, partners Kurt Chenier (left) and Shin Thompson were awarded the IWFS Certificate of Merit for their fine cuisine and excellent attention to service.

    Image

    You can see all the photos on the branch website at http://www.wideopenwest.com/~jdanza/
    John Danza
  • Post #96 - December 5th, 2007, 5:29 pm
    Post #96 - December 5th, 2007, 5:29 pm Post #96 - December 5th, 2007, 5:29 pm
    We attended this past Saturday's "underground dinner" and had a lovely time. All of the food was very good. I would say the portions were probably about 95% of the amount of food I would have liked but, hey, maybe that's a good thing now and then.

    The meal started with spicy tuna tartare. This was a tartare with some chile oil in the mix served with tobiko (both "regular" and "spicy"). Good quality tuna and the tobiko added a nice crunch.

    Next was soup. Butternut squash and fuji apple. The soup was served with a cranberry and walnut fritter. I'm usually not a fan of butternut squash soup, but the addition of apple to the mix made it a really interesting dish. The fritter has like a small hunk of stuffing, which is always a good thing in my book.

    Next were duck and fennel pot stickers. The filling was tasty, but the sauce for the pot stickers was a little salty and one dimensional.

    The main course was a sake glazed stripped bass. Again, excellent quality fish cooked just shy of medium. The skin was left on which I appreciate. I just would have enjoyed it more if the skin had been a little crispy.

    Dessert was the one course I was a little unsure about going in. It was advertised as a winter root vegetable cake with beet icing. It actually turned out to be really good, the flavor most reminding me of a warm spice cake.

    Service was a bit flighty. Plates were removed from the table before all diners were finished and none of the courses arrived with even the slightest bit of explanation.

    At $75 per person after tax and tip I was generally pretty happy with the experience and would definitely attend another "underground" dinner. What really sells this place for me though is the "homey" atmosphere and the overall lack of pretensions. Bonsoiree continues to be one of my favorite off-the-beaten-path spots.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #97 - June 5th, 2008, 8:14 pm
    Post #97 - June 5th, 2008, 8:14 pm Post #97 - June 5th, 2008, 8:14 pm
    Wow. What a great introduction for bon soiree. What an entertaining account of events to read about.

    I'm curious if anyone is still going to dinner here and still regards it so highly.

    Has anyone been here recently? The last bon soiree thread I can find has old reviews of the place. We have reservations on Sunday but I'm wondering if they're still delivering.

    Bonsoiree
    2728 W Armitage Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60647
    773-486-7511
    www.bon-soiree.com
  • Post #98 - June 5th, 2008, 9:46 pm
    Post #98 - June 5th, 2008, 9:46 pm Post #98 - June 5th, 2008, 9:46 pm
    I'll be there on Saturday. I haven't been there in a couple of months, but I have no reason to believe that their high quality has tailed off.
    John Danza
  • Post #99 - June 6th, 2008, 10:40 am
    Post #99 - June 6th, 2008, 10:40 am Post #99 - June 6th, 2008, 10:40 am
    I'm going this Saturday for the early dinner. I've quit posting about it, because I pretty much have it on my regular rotation. It is especially nice on the patio. Get on their website to get the "underground" invitation.
  • Post #100 - June 6th, 2008, 3:58 pm
    Post #100 - June 6th, 2008, 3:58 pm Post #100 - June 6th, 2008, 3:58 pm
    I still really enjoy their food, but the service seemed a little lackluster on my last visit.

    They seated my date and I at the table nearest the back door, which, being the dead of winter and all, received a draft every time somebody opened the back door for something or other. I realize somebody has to sit there, so I didn't say anything.

    After being seated, we were asked if we wanted to put anything in the kitchen to chill. I told our server that no, we wouldn't be drinking tonight. He told me of a liquor store down the street with a nice selection, but I don't drink, so I again politely let him know that we wouldn't be drinking tonight. He acknowledged, and then stepped away quickly. No problem. But our table was skipped when they were serving the amusee (had to flag down the host for it), and I had to ask twice for our water to be refilled.

    Meanwhile, our server was fawning over a woman at the table next to us, who I heard ask him if he liked the article she wrote. It could've been a certain female Trib food critic, one whose name I've heard denigrated around these parts a number of times! I didn't get a good enough look at her to be sure, though.

    Anyway, the food was fantastic as always, but the service was a little off. It won't prevent me from returning, in any case.
  • Post #101 - June 6th, 2008, 5:38 pm
    Post #101 - June 6th, 2008, 5:38 pm Post #101 - June 6th, 2008, 5:38 pm
    nicinchic wrote:I'm going this Saturday for the early dinner..


    Sorry I'll miss you. My wife and I will be there for the later seating.
    John Danza
  • Post #102 - June 7th, 2008, 6:51 pm
    Post #102 - June 7th, 2008, 6:51 pm Post #102 - June 7th, 2008, 6:51 pm
    I just wanted to pick up on Oculi's post from above. My husband and I recently went to Bonsoiree to celebrate a special occasion. We had a similarly unsettling pairing of outstanding food and disappointing service.

    Our bottle of wine was opened and first glasses poured before we even had a chance to sit down, which gave us a strong signal there wouldn't be time to linger and enjoy. Our amuse was also skipped, and when we brought this to the server's attention, he got terse with us, as if we'd been nervy to ask. He seemed fully disengaged with the food, answering questions with one-word answers and distractedly looking toward the door. And when he finally warmed up, he made some off-color jokes about me "getting lucky" with my husband. While I'm hardly a prude, I found the whole thing off-putting, and I'll admit I'd probably hesitate to recommend the restaurant as fervently as I used to.

    All that said, the food was indescribably good (kona kampachi appetizer, grilled escolar, and the house bread pudding for dessert). It's a shame the experience was sullied by service that left us feeling, in the end, unwelcome.
  • Post #103 - June 8th, 2008, 3:02 am
    Post #103 - June 8th, 2008, 3:02 am Post #103 - June 8th, 2008, 3:02 am
    My wife and I had a great dinner on Saturday night. The menu was such that I ended up only bringing white wine to the restaurant, although a tawny port would have gone well with dessert. While all the courses were excellent, the main course was fabulous, with the linguine being a bit toothsome and al dente, the way I like it, with a great flavor from the emulsion.

    I did not see any hiccups in service this evening, however I know that in the past the service of the amuse can be a little spotty. Once the amuse is out of the way, the courses flow at a good timing. Here's some photos from this evening's dinner:

    First Course - Hama Hama Oyster Motoyaki, torched ponzu aioli, crunchy celery rook, micro tatsoi

    Image

    Second Course - Leek and Fuji apple consomme, fennel duck confit dumpling

    Image

    Third Course - Pan seared foie gras, mission fig and Medjool date purees, chestnut custard, phyllo crisp

    Image

    Fourth Course - Homemade linguine, Manila clams and diver scallops, truffled bouillabaisse emulsion, slow roasted tomatoes and crisp parsnips

    Image

    Dessert - White peach "Crumbel", chocolate Bailey's hazelnut ice cream, cinnamon tuile, pink peppercorn caramel

    Image
    Last edited by John Danza on June 8th, 2008, 11:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
    John Danza
  • Post #104 - June 8th, 2008, 9:27 am
    Post #104 - June 8th, 2008, 9:27 am Post #104 - June 8th, 2008, 9:27 am
    John - nice review. But can you reduce the pix to no more than 600 pixels wide? Makes it tough to read as it is.
  • Post #105 - June 8th, 2008, 11:10 am
    Post #105 - June 8th, 2008, 11:10 am Post #105 - June 8th, 2008, 11:10 am
    nr706 wrote:John - nice review. But can you reduce the pix to no more than 600 pixels wide? Makes it tough to read as it is.


    Sorry, my bad. I'm used to posting high res photos on vintage fountain pen website because folks like to see detail there. I've made the adjustment on the photos.

    John
    John Danza
  • Post #106 - June 8th, 2008, 3:40 pm
    Post #106 - June 8th, 2008, 3:40 pm Post #106 - June 8th, 2008, 3:40 pm
    John- I couldn't agree more. I wanted to pick that oyster up and slurp all the juice right out of it!!
    a half dozen would have been about perfect.
    I thought every course was stellar. I can see how service can be off-putting. Similar to Schwa, you have chefs serving you, and they are trying to engage in conversation about food. I like it, however, the people seated next to us, just kind of ate and got out.
  • Post #107 - June 8th, 2008, 8:02 pm
    Post #107 - June 8th, 2008, 8:02 pm Post #107 - June 8th, 2008, 8:02 pm
    Having just eaten here I have to say what a nice find.

    The past threads stay true to current tastings.

    The amuse was a citrus cured salmon that was very chewy with clean, bold and crisp flavors. The first course was a diver sea scallop baked in the shell with celery root diced on top, very rich and flavorful with a smoky and creamy combination paired up nicely with the fresh and crisp, almost sour, flavor of the celery root. The second course was oxtail with bone marrow and spatzle, equally rich and full of flavor. The third course was froie gras that was pictured above. My only complaint on this dish was proportion of sauces to froie gras. The fourth course was a fish course - the name of the fish escapes me - with parmesan risotto and a truffle cream sauce over pencil asparagus. Again, very rich and flavorful and probably my favorite of the night. The fifth course was lamb two ways with a delicious braised lamb filled pastry. The sixth course was a cheese course of four different cheeses - mostly cow's milk - with dried cranberries, pistachios, hazelnuts, and a nice fig. The dessert course was a trio of raspberry mouse pyramid, chocolate creme brulee, and a delicious banana bread pudding with white chocolate sauce.

    Overall this was a great tasting dinner well worthy of the price.

    On a note outside of food I found parking easy, the atmosphere casual, and the service and pace of the meal satisfactory. I think there are about five people working in total and they seemed to handle the pace nicely for such a small crew.

    Their website doesn't say if they valet and the answer is, no, they do not - not to worry though parking is readily available. You don't need to worry about dressing up too nicely - and of course they're BYOB. (I looked for this info but couldn't fine it, save BYOB, so I figured I would add it for anyone wondering about these policies.) I felt totally comfortable wearing jeans.

    I will definitely be returning.
  • Post #108 - June 11th, 2008, 7:26 am
    Post #108 - June 11th, 2008, 7:26 am Post #108 - June 11th, 2008, 7:26 am
    Well, after lurking for the past few months I felt I finally needed to register and post. Living in Albany Park, there aren't too many fine dining experiences that we've found so far, so we decided on a night "on the town". (Not that I'm complaining about AP - we have a pretty good variety of places to choose from in general.) We had a pretty good experience there last night with the 5-course tasting menu. It was a baby-free night for us but we ate early out of habit so we had the inside seating all to ourselves.

    We had the same salmon amuse and oyster starter that were mentioned previously, as well as some kampachi (IIRC) sashimi with fresh pickled ginger and wasabi. Those were all outstanding. The salad was OK, the entree was a stuffed quail, again OK, but quail generally isn't my cup of tea.

    All in all, a solid B+. We'll definitely be back and I'll try some different things.

    Thanks to all of you for your great finds and advice. This is a killer forum.
  • Post #109 - September 11th, 2008, 1:16 am
    Post #109 - September 11th, 2008, 1:16 am Post #109 - September 11th, 2008, 1:16 am
    Has anyone been here recently? I actually used to work with the Chefs/Owners of this restraurant (especially Luke) and am embarrased to say I've never been able to eat here. :oops: If anyone has any recent personal reviews please let me know. I'm looking to go very soon (whether or not your reviews are good :P ) Luke was a passionate cook...I can't wait to see what he's got going.
    GOOD TIMES!
  • Post #110 - September 11th, 2008, 6:56 am
    Post #110 - September 11th, 2008, 6:56 am Post #110 - September 11th, 2008, 6:56 am
    I've been there several times over the past couple of months and the quality and innovation has remained consistent to what I've posted in the past. I'll be there again tomorrow night.
    John Danza
  • Post #111 - January 5th, 2009, 1:35 pm
    Post #111 - January 5th, 2009, 1:35 pm Post #111 - January 5th, 2009, 1:35 pm
    I attended the New Year's Eve Dinner at Bonsoiree, and couldn't have been more pleased.
    We arrived at 7:30, and the table was just where we wanted it, and we were seated immediately. All of our wine was chilled or decanted by Shin and we were ready to eat.

    There was a five course tasting menu that we knew about in advance.
    The first course may have been the tastiest just because of the presentation, and the freshness of the sashimi.
    Duet of salt, orange nori dust, Champagne bubbles (similar to a foam), inside out crusted trout, that was spectacular. In fact, our table suggested that this should have been an amuse because the flavors were so distinct and it would have been the perfect way to start the meal. There was no amuse which was surprising to us. The trout was wrapped around a macadema nut. It was salty, and buttery and crispy all at the same time. We could have eaten these like popcorn. Another standout on the plate was the preserved gooseberries. There were two, sliced in half and marinated in what I think was a vinigarette of some sort, very tart and sweet at the same time.
    The second course was winter mushroom soup, Cognac and Porcini, Shabu-Shabu Kobe beef, potato fry on top of the soup. The beef could be dipped in the soup, but I liked it raw as it was served. Very tender and the fat melted on the tongue. The soup was woody and I think there was a small bit of truffle oil on top, Really rich and flavorful, outstanding.
    Third course was a Mesquite smoked Juji-kan Awabi (abalone) , Uni-ponzu Aioli, soba salad. This was served in a little box, that Luke rigged a little smoker to, and then closed the lid. So, when the top came off, the mesquite smoke wafted up, flavoring the abalone. I was shocked that this method didn't overpower the food. It was just a hint.
    Fourth course wasn't my favorite of all of the courses, but in full disclosure, I really only like crispy duck. This was a seared duck breast in an amazing sauce of ale reduction with veal marrow, carmelized apple, leek duchesse and deep fried butter. Yes, deep fried butter. This was one awesome bite of food. It was a ball of butter in a battter, fried, so when you put your fork in it, butter oozed out. The duck breast to me was cooked medium rare, but the fat wasn't rendered and it was chewy. But, like I said, maybe it's just me.
    The fifth course was french cheese and a pistachio brittle and blackberry jam. It was a fine close to a wonderful meal.
    The service was spot on, and Shin did everything he could to make our out of town guests feel comfortable. I was informed that Kurt is no longer part of the restaurant, but I didn't ask where he went off to.

    I'm glad that the "check please" crowd hasn't ruined this restaurant. I'll have to go during the week and see if the regular menu is the same.
  • Post #112 - February 21st, 2009, 7:43 am
    Post #112 - February 21st, 2009, 7:43 am Post #112 - February 21st, 2009, 7:43 am
    So I get home from work yesterday around 5:15, and say "honey, I'm going to call Bon Soiree to see if they have a 6:00 for two; if they do, then it was meant to be".

    We did the seven-course.

    Amuse-bouche was an "inside-out trout shooter". It was pretty much trout balled around a roasted(or toasted) macadamia nut sitting in a frothy, creamy, warm something. The taste was superb, and the texture made it over-the-top.

    Salad was baby/micro watercress with crispy duck skin, pickled radish(I think), lotus root poached in ponzu, and tempura sea beans. The watercress was like no other. Not very peppery,lemony, or bitter like we're used to. It tasted more like mache with the essence of watercress. Delicious!

    Box-smoked bacon with toasted marshmallows. This came out in individual smoking boxes. Chef Thompson put them on our table pulled off the top and kindly demanded that we take whiff. I almost passed out in ecstasy. I now imagine heaven to be that moment frozen in time. The marshmallow had a licorice taste that paired flawlessly with the bacon. When we asked what they used, our server replied, "Ouzo!". Are you all getting this? Someone figured out what to do with that godforsaken liqour that nearly made me barf in Athens. It's like the Greeks invented it for the sole purpoe of Shin Thompson to turn it into a marshmallow and pair it with house-smoked bacon.

    The soup course was parsnip and chestnut with snow crab two ways on grilled toast. The soup had some paprika oil and the slightest little dollap of eggnog creme fraiche. The crab was a piece of crab meat on a spread of crab meat on toast. The subtle smokey char of the toast complemented the crab nicely.

    Next was a scallop, in shell, with a ponzu aoili. Rich salty goodness enveloping the sweetness of the scallops. For a moment, I felt it was too much flavor, but then the next dish came out, and the stars aligned.

    Wagyu beef cheek rilette. It came with a small sphere of yogurt that you pop like an egg yolk over the rilette. You do not need teeth for this course. The rich beef paired perfectly with the yogurt, which makes sense when you think of how Indian cooking pairs lamb with yogurt. There was some other stuff on the plate, but for me it was an afterthought next to the beef-yogurt combo.

    Cheese course was a goat cheese poud cake with chevre cream cheese spread on it like icing. It also had an artistic smear of berry puree. The flavors were awesome, but the presentation was even better. It looked like a slice of mini birthday cake.

    And finally, dessert. There were four components meant to be eaten together to create, of all things, Panang curry! Red curry ice cream over peanut butter crispy something, with kaffir lime glace-like puree and sweet sticky rice. It sounds weird, but it worked. I would eat it again and again.

    Don't be discouraged by price. $85 dollars for a 7 course at a BYO of this caliber is worth it. Skip three to four meals out, and go to Bon Soiree. I can't imagine anyone ever being let down. For me, Bon Soiree is as memorable as Tru, but delivers more blow-me-away, over-the-top dishes. You can tell that the inventiveness of every dish is a result of more than just an idea. I don't know this for sure, but I get the impression that Chef Thompson does NOT try dishes out on people. It really seems like every seemingly bizarre flavor pairing that he thinks up gets tweaked to perfection after countless hours in the kitchen.
    "We eat slowly and with gusto." - Paul Bäumer in AQOTWF
  • Post #113 - March 26th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Post #113 - March 26th, 2009, 8:28 am Post #113 - March 26th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Today's Daily Groupon is $50 gift cert to Bonsoiree for $20. It is only available today.

    http://groupon.thepoint.com/

    I have no affiliation with either place, other than purchasing previous GroupOn coupons for local places.

    Jamie
  • Post #114 - March 26th, 2009, 11:27 am
    Post #114 - March 26th, 2009, 11:27 am Post #114 - March 26th, 2009, 11:27 am
    I got my groupon, and can't wait to try this place out! With so much success, I'm actually surprised that they would even do a groupon, but what do I know :?:
    Models Eat too!!!
    www.bellaventresca.com
  • Post #115 - March 26th, 2009, 2:37 pm
    Post #115 - March 26th, 2009, 2:37 pm Post #115 - March 26th, 2009, 2:37 pm
    Got mine also!
  • Post #116 - April 10th, 2009, 10:39 am
    Post #116 - April 10th, 2009, 10:39 am Post #116 - April 10th, 2009, 10:39 am
    Dined at Bonsoiree for the first time last night with my wife for her birthday. We opted for the seven course menu, which corresponded exactly to the one currently listed on their website. Simply put, it was the best meal I've had thus far in 2009, and may also surpass any meal I had in 2008. The most recent truly comparable meal that I've had was a visit to L2O at the end of December; last evening was a superior meal in all aspects other than atmosphere.

    Unfortunately, my wife is too self-conscious to enjoy allowing me to take pictures in any sort of high-end restaurant. I don't believe I have regretted that more on any occasion than last night's dinner. The presentations/plating far surpassed my expectations based on the pictures I had seen in this thread.

    Things kicked off with a kona kampachi sashimi amuse that had some wasabi, pomegranate, and a gelee that escapes me dotted on top, served on a shark skin paddle. The sashimi itself was excellent, and the toppings made for a wonderfully complex mouthful. That was followed by a salad of shaved cucumber, pickled eggplant, Shimeji mushrooms, bacon cubes, and crispy garlic. Very refreshing, though I must admit that while the bacon cubes were enjoyed, they didn't seem to quite fit with the other ingredients.

    On to an off-menu scallop preparation served in a sea shell. I cannot recall the description nearly well enough (all descriptions, by the way, were well beyond adequate - from the simple listing of the ingredients themselves, to any sort of interesting additional information on them, to the suggested method of consumption), but I do know it involved ponzu sauce and Japanese radish. And that it was utterly delicious. My wife and I were both barely able to refrain from licking the shell for any last little tastes.

    This was followed by the tea smoked baby octopus with their take on gravlax made with rhubarb and something else as opposed to salmon. When the chef opened the boxes that were placed before us there was an immediate rush of tea smoke that set the tone beautifully for this dish. The smoky flavor was clear, but delicate, and the unorthodox gravlax accompaniment went very well with the octopus.

    Next was a cup of Japanese broth, miso, stinging nettles, with a few Prince Edward Island mussels accompanied by the soba dauphine with a sauce made from ramps, and a bit of bruleed kumquat. All aspects of this dish were wonderful, and the broth achieved a perfect level of saltiness that was quite appreciated at this point in the meal.

    The yellow edge grouper with artichokes, farro, and tomato in place of the asparagus listed on the website was good, but the relative low point of the meal for both of us. Nothing about this dish particularly stood out, or sang to us. Not that either of us refrained from finishing every last morsel on the plate.

    The final main course was spring lamb in 2 preparations - two slices of beautifully rare loin, and a lamb sausage of sorts. Accompanied by the house made "death" mustard, which had a delightful kick to it, fiddleheads, and cauliflower and saffron mousse. I must admit that I am not very fond of saffron, yet I found the mousse to work quite well as a periodic addition to a bite of lamb with the death mustard.

    Our cheese course was actually a bit of fondue served in an espresso cup, made from an Australian Roaring 40's blue cheese. There was a stick protruding from the cup made from the same cheese, and a bit of house-made cotton candy with a dusting of huckleberry. I don't even like blue cheese normally, but I'm fairly certain I got every last drop of the fondue out of that cup.

    Dessert consisted of a small but delicious brownie with a frozen topping that consisted of a number of ingredients that all escape me aside from coconut, unfortunately. Great brownie though :D Also their take on a Tahitian Treat accompanied by a thin strip of dried pineapple, and a few spoonfuls of what was described as "house made Pop Rocks." An appreciated bit of whimsy, and a nice light dessert overall after the preceding courses.
  • Post #117 - September 9th, 2009, 5:33 am
    Post #117 - September 9th, 2009, 5:33 am Post #117 - September 9th, 2009, 5:33 am
    New Groupon deal - http://www.groupon.com/deals/bonsoiree- ... newsletter
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #118 - September 9th, 2009, 8:46 am
    Post #118 - September 9th, 2009, 8:46 am Post #118 - September 9th, 2009, 8:46 am


    My wife and I enjoyed our first meal at Bonsoiree so much that I feel slightly guilty using another Groupon for whenever we manage a second visit. That said, saving $ is a good thing right now, and thank you very much for the heads-up.
  • Post #119 - October 2nd, 2009, 8:36 pm
    Post #119 - October 2nd, 2009, 8:36 pm Post #119 - October 2nd, 2009, 8:36 pm
    We are looking at this for tomorrow (Saturday night). Don't know anything about it but it looks good and we would appreciate any comments.
  • Post #120 - October 2nd, 2009, 9:04 pm
    Post #120 - October 2nd, 2009, 9:04 pm Post #120 - October 2nd, 2009, 9:04 pm
    Aren't Saturdays reserved for "underground dining"? If so, you need to have joined their mailing list and reserved in advance. No walk-ins or same day reservations. This pertains to Saturdays only.

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