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#1
Posted March 1st 2006, 5:42pm
My friend, Phai, called me from Spoon Thai this afternoon to tell me that they have a brand new seven page Thai (language) menu.

Soon thereafter he showed up at my place with a copy in his hand.

By the looks of it, there is a whole lot of new stuff.

I will translate it and put it up here just as soon as I am able.*

E.M.

P.S. The word on the street is that you might soon be able to order all of your Spoon Thai favourites at Silver Spoon, too. ;)

* I have nearly completed a brand new translation for another restaurant and that will take precedent. :!:
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#2
Posted March 1st 2006, 6:56pm
Thanks for the great news . . . not that I have ever gotten bored with any of Spoon's offerings, but I love trying new items and I love Spoon Thai. And very curious about "another restaurant" (as you say in your post) . . . and thank you very much for all of your work with the translated menus -- you have helped people like me take Thai dining to an entirely different level.
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#3
Posted March 2nd 2006, 5:49pm
I'm very bummed that we've moved back to the north suburbs - had one meal delivered by Spoon, and it was incredible. Can't wait to see the new menu.
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#4
Posted April 2nd 2006, 3:40pm
While waiting for sazerac and A2Fay to join me for lunch yesterday, I had a better look at Spoon's new Thai language menu.

One of the dishes which caught my eye was khâo phàt plaa salìd, or "fried rice with Gouramy fish."*

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(photograph compliments of sazerac)

It turned out to be my favourite dish of the day, and one which I look forward to having again, very soon.**

E.M.

* I have written about plaa salìd at some length before.

** To say that it was my "favourite dish of the day" is really saying something because yesterday was a day filled with great Thai foodstuffs. For lunch, and in addition to the khâo phàt plaa salìd, I also had Spoon's papaya salad with pickled crab, banana blossom salad, shrimp paste dip with grilled mackerel and crudités, kao-lão mũu yâw, and kaeng tai plaa. And, then later, from PNA, I purchased (more) homemade kaeng tai plaa, phàt phèt sà-tàw (spicy curry fry with pork and sator beans), and néua tàet dìaw (beef "jerky"). And, then, even later, for dinner at Sticky Rice, I had sùkîi-yaki mũu (spicy mung bean noodle soup with pork). And, then, MUCH LATER, at approximately 3a.m., and after a night of drinking and carousing, I joined several Thai friends at an undisclosed location where I enjoyed mũu má-nao, râat nâa mũu, and nãem sii-khrong. So, yeah, it was truly stupendous fried rice. ;)

Original post edited to add photo links.
Last edited by Erik M. on July 19th 2006, 8:16am, edited 3 times in total.
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#5
Posted April 2nd 2006, 6:41pm
Giant Gourami perhaps?
http://www.thaifishingguide.com/gallery ... urami.html

http://www.bristolzoo.org.uk/learning/a ... nt-gourami

On a side note, I remember seeing in an Asian market a jar of preserved gouramis (small) which looked like the blue gouramis I used to purchase from Petsmart and raise in a tank.
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#6
Posted April 2nd 2006, 7:21pm
http://www.aquarticles.com/articles/lit ... ences.html

Though a fish is a fish is a fish...
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#7
Posted April 2nd 2006, 10:30pm
Mhays wrote:http://www.aquarticles.com/articles/literature/Hawksby_Reminiscences.html

Though a fish is a fish is a fish...


I did provide a photo, after all. ;)

E.M.
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#8
Posted April 2nd 2006, 10:45pm
Erik M. wrote:One of the dishes which caught my eye was khâo phàt plaa salìd, or "fried rice with Gouramy fish."


This was indeed a fabulous fried rice. The rice was a little chewy and every grain coated with a bit of oil and lovely slight saltiness from the fish. Fresh vegetables in the fried rice were a welcome accent (as opposed to the freezer veggie mixes - with corn - at some other places). Spoon served a tremendous lunch - among the finest impromptu meals I've had in a long time (with thanks to Erik and his translations).

Erik, hope the translation of the 'new' menu is moving along. I can't wait to fork out for whatever else Spoon dishes out. :)
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#9
Posted May 6th 2006, 6:59am
Any progress on the new menu Eric?
Craving to go to Spoon and try their newly expanded list.
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#10
Posted May 6th 2006, 8:28am
Whisk wrote:Any progress on the new menu Eric?
Craving to go to Spoon and try their newly expanded list.


I am still settling into my new home, but, yes, I am making progress on the new menu. In fact, I worked on it a bit yesterday.

With this menu I intend to make the individual pages available as soon as they are completed.

E.M.
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#11
Posted May 6th 2006, 1:37pm
Is Spoon Thai at 4608 N Western? I've yet to try it, and after reading about it on this thread I'm eager to go! I visited Thailand last December for a week and had some really great food there. Am looking forward to trying more Thai places in Chicago.

Any other recommendations for good Thai food in the city?
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#12
Posted May 8th 2006, 8:57am
pizzicato wrote:Is Spoon Thai at 4608 N Western?


Yes.

pizzicato wrote:I've yet to try it, and after reading about it on this thread I'm eager to go!


I just had another great meal at Spoon, last night.

Our menu included:

miang plaa tuu - "one bite salad" with grilled mackerel
khao phat plaa salit - fried rice with Gouramy fish
yam khaw muu yaang kap taeng kwaa - grilled pork neck salad with cucumbers
kaeng tai plaa - Southern Thai-style fish kidney curry
tom khlong plaa chawn - sour and spicy soup with Mudfish
kai thawt - fried chicken with tamarind-flavoured dipping sauce

pizzicato wrote:Any other recommendations for good Thai food in the city?


For starters, click on the Silapaahaan link in my signature line.

Regards,
E.M.
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#13
Posted May 8th 2006, 10:33am
"Southern Thai-style fish kidney curry"

I wonder if it's difficult accumulating enough fish kidneys to make a curry; I've never seen them for sale at any Asian market. :wink:
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#14
Posted May 8th 2006, 3:13pm
Jay K wrote:"Southern Thai-style fish kidney curry"

I wonder if it's difficult accumulating enough fish kidneys to make a curry; I've never seen them for sale at any Asian market. :wink:


555! :lol:

The base for this type of curry usu. comes in a jar!

----------

My very favourite version of kaeng tai plaa can be found at PNA:

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"tai plaa"

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kaeng tai plaa - Southern Thai-style fish kidney curry with sator beans, squash, and Thai eggplant

The owner of PNA knows that I love the stuff, and she now calls me whenever it comes in. :wink:

PNA
2310 W. Leland Ave.
773.784.1797

E.M.

P.S. I am now finished with the first three pages of Spoon's new Thai language menu. I will put it up as soon as I am finished formatting it. Most likely tmrw.

ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTOS.
Last edited by Erik M. on May 10th 2006, 7:44am, edited 1 time in total.
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#15
Posted May 9th 2006, 3:25pm
Here are the first three translated pages of the 2006 Thai menu:

SPOON THAI MENU TRANSLATION (2006)

AAHÃAN RÎAK NÁAM YÔI : "SNACKS AND APPETIZERS"

paw pía thâwt tua lèk 9 tua : fried “baby” spring rolls (nine pieces)
thâwt man plaa kraai : fried fish cakes
lûuk chín plaa lâak (tham eng) : blanched housemade fishballs
paw pía sòt : fresh spring rolls
thùa thâwt : fried peanuts
mét má-mûang hìmáphaan thâwt : fried cashew nuts
mîang plaa thuu : “one-bite” mackerel salad // lettuce leaves topped with grilled mackerel, peanut, and ginger
khaw mũu yâang : grilled pork neck strips with a savoury sauce
mũu pîng (5 máai) : grilled pork skewers (5) with chile/garlic dipping sauce
kài thâwt : Thai-style fried chicken served with a spicy tamarind dipping sauce
kíaw sâa : “gyoza” // potstickers
“crab rangoon” : fried crabmeat and cream cheese dumplings
mìi kràwp : deep-fried mung bean noodles with a sweet sauce
khanõm kûy châi : pan-fried chive dumplings
sà-té kài : satay skewers (chicken)
kûng hòm phâa : shrimp in a “blanket”
them-pura kûng kàp phàk lãai chanít : “tempura” // deep-fried battered shrimp and assorted vegetables
plaa mèuk yâang (pen tua yài) : grilled squid (whole)
hãwy thâwt : Thai-style omelette with mussels
sâi kràwk isãan : grilled Isaan-style pork and rice sausage, served with chile, ginger, and peanuts
puu jãa : deep-fried crab and shrimp “fingers” with a sweet and sour dipping sauce
néua tàet dìaw : dried “jerky” beef served with a sweet and salty dipping sauce
khanõm bêuang yawn : Vietnamese-style rice flour crepe, with bean sprouts, tofu, shrimp, and coconut
mîang kham : “one-bite” salad // lettuce leaves topped with coconut, dried shrimp, peanut and onion
hàw mòk plaa dùk (tham eng) : steamed Catfish and coconut milk “custard”
kài má-nao ( bàep khriim ) : lightly-battered chicken strips with a lime-flavoured mayonnaise sauce
sâi ùa : fried Northern Thai-style spicy red sausage
thùa rae : steamed soybeans (edamame)
tâo-hûu thâwt : fried tofu with sweet and sour dipping sauce


KHRÊUANG JÎM – YAM YAM : "DIPS AND SALADS"

sômtam puu khẽm : papaya salad with pickled crab
sômtam thai : papaya salad with poached shrimp and peanuts
phla kûng : shrimp and chile jam salad
kûng tà-khrái : shrimp, chile, and lemongrass salad
kûng châe náam plaa : raw shrimp marinated with lime juice, fish sauce, garlic and chile
náam tòk khaw mũu yâang : grilled pork neck salad with roasted rice powder
náam tòk mũu : “waterfall” pork // grilled pork salad with roasted rice powder
náam tòk néua : “waterfall” beef // grilled beef salad with roasted rice powder
náam phrík kà-pì - plaa thuu : shrimp paste “dip,” served with grilled mackerel and crudités
lâap pèt : Isaan-style minced duck salad
lâap mũu : Isaan-style minced pork salad
lâap kài : Isaan-style minced chicken salad
yam plaa salìit : fried Gouramy fish salad
yam plaa mèuk : grilled squid salad
yam ruam míit tháleh : mixed seafood salad
yam hèt khẽm thawng : enoki mushroom salad with roasted rice powder
yam mũu yâang kàp taeng kwaa : grilled pork neck salad with sliced cucumber
yam lûuk chín plaa : fishball salad
yam wún sên : mung bean noodle salad
yam hũa plii : banana blossom salad with poached chicken, shrimp, coconut milk, and chile jam
yam maa-mâa : MaMa™ instant noodle salad with chicken and shrimp
yam khài yiaw mûa : preserved egg salad with garlic, peanut, ginger, and lime juice
nãem sòt (mũu sàp) : sour and spicy Northern Thai-style salad with minced pork, ginger, peanut, and chile
nãem sòt (kài sàp) : sour and spicy Northern Thai-style salad with minced chicken, ginger, peanut, and chile
yam nãem : Northern Thai-style “pressed ham” salad with onion, chile, ginger, and peanut
tàp wãan (lâap) : “sweet liver” salad (“lâap”-style, with roasted rice powder)
nãem khâo thâwt : deep-fried rice salad with Northern Thai-style "pressed ham"
yam mũu yâw : salad with large, Vietnamese-style steamed pork sausage, lime juice, and garlic
kao-lao mũu yâw (bàep hâeng) : salad with VN-style steamed pork sausage, beansprouts, and Chinese broccoli
súp nàw mái : pickled bamboo shoot salad with roasted rice powder


KHÔO RÁK – KHÔO RÓT AAHÃAN DÈT : “TASTY COMBINATIONS”

phàt phàk ruam míit : stir-fried mixed vegetables
kha-náa náam man hãwy : Chinese broccoli stir-fried with oyster sauce
kha-náa mũu kràwp : Chinese broccoli stir-fried with crispy pork
kha-náa plaa khẽm : Chinese broccoli stir-fried with “salty fish”
thùa ngâwk phàt tâo-hûu : beansprouts stir-fried with tofu
thùa ngâwk fai daeng : bean sprouts stir-fried with fermented yellow bean sauce & chile
phàk bûng fai daeng : water spinach stir-fried with fermented yellow bean sauce & chile
thùa phàt phrík khĩng lûuk chín plaa : spicy and sweet curry fry with green beans and fish balls
thùa phàt phrík khĩng kài, mũu, néua : spicy and sweet curry fry with chicken, pork, or beef
phàt krà-phrao kài, mũu, néua : holy basil stir-fried with chicken, pork, or beef
phàt krà-phrao khãa mũu : holy basil stir-fried with pork leg meat
phàt krà-phrao mũu kràwp, kûng, plaa mèuk, pèt : holy basil stir-fried with crispy pork, shrimp, squid, or duck
kài phàt má-mûang hìmáphaan : chicken stir-fried with cashews
phàt phrík sà-tàw mũu sàp : minced pork and bitter bean (Parkia speciosa) stir-fry
phàt phrík sà-tàw kûng sàp : minced shrimp and bitter bean (Parkia speciosa) stir-fry
phàt phèt mũu pàa : spicy stir-fry with wild boar
plaa dùk phàt phèt : spicy stir-fry with Catfish
phàt prîaw wãan kài, mũu, néua : sweet and sour stir-fry with chicken, pork, or beef
phàt prîaw wãan kûng : sweet and sour stir-fry with shrimp
mũu krà-thiam phrík thai : pork stir-fried with garlic and black pepper
kài krà-thiam phrík thai : chicken stir-fried with garlic and black pepper
kra-dòok mũu thâwt krà-thiam phrík thai : pork ribs stir-fried with garlic and black pepper
phàk kàat dawng phàt phrík : pickled cabbage stir-fried with oyster sauce and chile
phàt phrík nàw mái mũu sàp : bamboo shoots and minced pork stir-fried with chile
phàt phèt plaa lãi : spicy stir-fry with eel
phàt yâwt máphráo kûng : young coconut stir-fried with shrimp
phàt yâwt máphráo kài, mũu, néua : young coconut stir-fried with chicken, pork, or beef
phàt kîawm chàai krà-phao mũu : pickled Chinese vegetable stir-fried with pork stomach

More to follow shortly...

E.M.

ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTO LINKS.
Last edited by Erik M. on March 8th 2007, 10:06am, edited 8 times in total.
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#16
Posted May 9th 2006, 3:32pm
Erik M. wrote:Here are the first three translated pages of the 2006 Thai menu:


WOW! I can't get there fast enough -- thanks for the hard work. It's very much appreciated.
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#17
Posted May 9th 2006, 3:39pm
BR wrote:
Erik M. wrote:Here are the first three translated pages of the 2006 Thai menu:


WOW! I can't get there fast enough -- thanks for the hard work. It's very much appreciated.


I should warn you that the staff will not yet be able to employ my newly translated pages.

At this point, you might have to rely on counting down the items on the corresponding Thai language menu.

E.M.
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#18
Posted May 9th 2006, 4:08pm
Erik M. wrote:Here are the first three translated pages of the 2006 Thai menu:

“crab rangoon” : fried crabmeat and cream cheese dumplings


Sure ya got that one right? :wink: :wink:

Seriously, I am REAL hungry right now. Thanks for the hard work! :D
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#19
Posted May 10th 2006, 2:23pm
Page four...

DÙAN SPOON : “SPOON EXPRESS”

khâo khãa mũu : red-braised pork hock in a sweet and savoury sauce, served with rice
khâo phàt nãem : rice fried with Northern Thai-style “pressed ham”
khâo phàt ruam míit tháleh : rice fried with assorted seafood
khâo phàt krà-phrao mũu (chín rẽu sàp) : rice fried with holy basil and pork (sliced or minced)
khâo phàt krà-phrao kài (chín rẽu sàp) : rice fried with holy basil and chicken (sliced or minced)
khâo phàt krà-phrao néua (chín rẽu sàp) : rice fried with holy basil and beef (sliced or minced)
khâo phàt krà-phrao kûng : rice fried with holy basil and shrimp
khâo phàt krà-phrao plaa mèuk : rice fried with holy basil and squid
khâo phàt krà-phrao ruam míit tháleh : rice fried with holy basil and assorted seafood
khâo phàt mũu, kài, néua : rice fried with pork, chicken, or beef
khâo phàt kûng : rice fried with shrimp
khâo phàt puu, plaa mèuk : rice fried with crab or squid
khâo phàt plaa salìd : rice fried with Gouramy fish
khâo khlûk kà-pì : shrimp paste rice with sliced omelette, slivered green apple, dried shrimp, and sweet pork
khâo phàt náam phrík plaa thuu : rice fried with shrimp paste and accompanied by grilled mackerel
kũay tĩaw phàt khîi mao mũu, kài, néua : stir-fried “drunkard’s” noodles with pork, chicken, or beef
kũay tĩaw phàt khîi mao kûng, plaa mèuk : stir-fried “drunkard’s” noodles with shrimp or squid
kũay tĩaw phàt khîi mao ruam míit tháleh : stir-fried “drunkard’s” noodles with assorted seafood
kũay tĩaw néua sàp : rice noodles stir-fried with minced beef
kũay tĩaw mũu sàp : rice noodles stir-fried with minced pork
kũay tĩaw phàt sii-yú kûng : rice noodles braised with soy sauce and shrimp
kũay tĩaw phàt sii-yú plaa mèuk : rice noodles braised with soy sauce and squid
kũay tĩaw phàt sii-yú ruam míit tháleh : rice noodles braised with soy sauce and assorted seafood
kũay tĩaw phàt sii-yú mũu : rice noodles braised with soy sauce and pork
kũay tĩaw phàt sii-yú néua : rice noodles braised with soy sauce and beef
kũay tĩaw râat nâa kha-náa mũu, kài, néua : rice noodles in yellow bean “gravy” with Chinese broccoli and pork, chicken, or beef
kũay tĩaw râat nâa kha-náa kûng, plaa mèuk : rice noodles in yellow bean “gravy” with Chinese broccoli and shrimp, or squid
kohy sii-mìi mũu, kài, néua : crispy egg noodles in a light “gravy” with pork, chicken, or beef
kohy sii-mìi kûng, plaa mèuk : crispy egg noodles in a light “gravy” with shrimp or squid
khanõm jiin náam yaa pàa : somen noodles with an herbal fish curry sauce, served with various accoutrements

More to follow shortly...

E.M.

ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTO LINKS.
Last edited by Erik M. on May 14th 2006, 8:30pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#20
Posted May 11th 2006, 4:26pm
I have some more questions for all of you "experienced" Thai food eaters!

Would anyone have specific dish recommendations at Spoon Thai for a family that has never eaten Thai before and doesn't like hot (spicey) or exotic (as in squid, stomach, etc.) foods?

We want to try some new (to us) foods and tastes but would appreciate some guidance.
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#21
Posted May 11th 2006, 5:00pm
How spicy is too spicy?

I think the banana blossom salad and the thai fried chicken would both work..
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#22
Posted May 11th 2006, 5:21pm
"How spicey is too spicey"---well, I'm trying to think of something most would have tasted that is spicey and could compare to...

Taco Bell hot sauce is too spicey for daughter and me, the guys could go that spicey though.

Jalapeno slices are too hot for daughter and me, the guys are fine with those spicey slices.

I can't, off the top of my head, think of anything else that is too spicey to compare to.

Does that give an idea?
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#23
Posted May 11th 2006, 5:28pm
joby wrote:I have some more questions for all of you "experienced" Thai food eaters!

Would anyone have specific dish recommendations at Spoon Thai for a family that has never eaten Thai before and doesn't like hot (spicey) or exotic (as in squid, stomach, etc.) foods?

We want to try some new (to us) foods and tastes but would appreciate some guidance.


Pad see ew or pad thai would probably be up your palettes' alleys. Both are noodle dishes and pretty standard at most Thai restaurants. You really can't go wrong.
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#24
Posted May 11th 2006, 6:38pm
Erik,

Thanks for posting these menus - you're a treasure of the chicago foodie internets.

Have you posted on PNA before? I didn't even realize it existed; anything particular to look out for there, aside from the tai plaa?

Seth
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#25
Posted May 11th 2006, 8:15pm
Seth Zurer wrote:Have you posted on PNA before?


No, not really.

I have been reluctant to discuss it in the past, but I intend to write something soon because there are some truly exceptional foodstuffs on offer at PNA. That, and, well, I now have the owner's blessing. :wink:

Seth Zurer wrote:I didn't even realize it existed; anything particular to look out for there, aside from the tai plaa?


I just stopped in today and picked up another version of kaeng tai paa, along with náam phrík kà-pì (shrimp paste “dip”), kaeng sôm (“sour,” tamarind-flavoured curry), and néua tàet dìaw (dried “jerky” beef).

In addition to the above items I also enjoy the mũu ping (grilled pork skewers), khâo khlûk kà-pì (shrimp paste-seasoned rice, served with sweet pork, sliced omelette, dried shrimp, and slivered red onions), phàt phèt plaa dùk (spicy curry fry with Catfish), phàt phèt mũu pàa (spicy curry fry with wild boar), phàt phèt sà-tàw (spicy curry fry with sator beans and pork), hàw mòk salmâwn (steamed Salmon and coconut milk “custard”), and assorted khanõm thai (Thai sweets).*

The offerings are a bit random, but I can tell you that the best days to stop by are Wed/Th (when many local Thais go to get the latest newspapers and magazines from Thailand) and Saturday. On these days there is quite an array.

The majority of the labeling on these items is in Thai, but the kindly owner/counterwoman will be happy to explain it all to you, I am sure.

E.M.

* The various foodstuffs come from various sources, but it is almost all homemade by local Thai women.

ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTO LINKS.
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#26
Posted May 15th 2006, 8:41pm
Pages five and six...

DÙAN SPOON : “SPOON EXPRESS” (CON’T)

sên jan phàt thai kûng sòt : thin rice noodles s/f with egg, tofu, and shrimp
sên jan phàt thai kài, mũu, néua : thin rice noodles s/f with egg, tofu, and chicken, pork, or beef
wún sên phàt khîi mao ruam míit tháleh : stir-fried “drunkard’s” (mung bean) noodles with assorted seafood
wún sên phàt khîi mao plaa mèuk, kûng : stir-fried “drunkard’s” (mung bean) noodles with squid or shrimp
wún sên phàt khîi mao mũu, kài, néua : stir-fried “drunkard’s” (mung bean) noodles with pork, chicken, or beef
kũay tĩaw reua lûuk chín néua pèuay sên jan : “boat” noodles // spicy noodle soup with beef and rice noodles
kũay tĩaw reua lûuk chín néua pèuay sên mìi khão : “boat” noodles // spicy noodle soup with tender beef and thin rice noodles
kũay tĩaw reua lûuk chín néua pèuay sên bà-mìi : “boat” noodles // spicy noodle soup with tender beef and egg noodles
kũay tĩaw reua lûuk chín néua pèuay sên yài : “boat” noodles // spicy noodle soup with tender beef and wide rice noodles
sùkîi kài (tâwng kaan náam rẽu hâeng bàwk dâai nákhá) : spicy and savoury mung bean noodle soup with vegetables and chicken (“wet” or "dry")
sùkîi mũu, néua : spicy and savoury mung bean noodle soup with vegetables, and pork, or beef (“wet” or "dry")
yen ta fo sên yài (tâwng kaan náam rẽu hâeng bàwk dâai nákhá) : wide rice noodles with tofu, vegetables, and seafood, in a thin, sour and spicy, tomato-flavoured broth
yen ta fo sên lék : rice noodles with tofu, vegetables, and seafood, in a thin, sour and spicy, tomato-flavoured broth
yen ta fo sên mìi khâo : thin rice noodles with tofu, vegetables, and seafood, in a thin, sour and spicy, tomato-flavoured broth
yen ta fo bà-mìi : thin egg noodles with tofu, vegetables, and seafood, in a thin, sour and spicy, tomato-flavoured broth
khâo sũay jaan lék : steamed rice (small plate)
khâo sũay jaan yài : steamed rice (large plate)
khâo nĩaw : sticky rice
khanõm jiin : somen noodles

TÔM YAM – THAM KAENG : “SOUPS AND CURRIES”

kaeng jèut taeng kwaa sàwt sâi : mild soup with stuffed cucumbers (c/o/m)
kaeng jèut plaa mèuk sàwt sâi : mild soup with stuffed squid (minced pork)
kaeng jèut kîawm chàai krà-phao mũu : mild soup with pickled Chinese vegetable and pork stomach
kaeng jèut kîawm chàai mũu sàp : mild soup with pickled Chinese vegetable and minced pork
kaeng jèut sáa rài tháleh mũu sàp : mild soup with seaweed and minced pork
kaeng jèut phàk kàat khâo mũu sàp sáa rài tháleh : mild soup with Napa cabbage, seaweed, and minced pork
kaeng jèut tâo-hûu mũu sàp : mild soup with tofu and minced pork
kaeng jèut wún sên mũu sàp : mild soup with mung bean noodles and minced pork

TÔM YAM – THAM KAENG : “SOUPS AND CURRIES” (CON’T)

kaeng jèut mára mũu sàp : mild soup with bitter melon and minced pork
kaeng liang kûng sòt (mâw fai) : spicy peppercorn curry with assorted vegetables and shrimp (served in a firepot)
kaeng sôm kûng phàk ruam (mâw fai) : thin, sour curry with shrimp and vegetables (served in a firepot)
kaeng sôm kûng yâwt máphráo àwn : thin, sour curry with shrimp and young coconut (served in a firepot)
kaeng sôm plaa châwn phàk ruam (pen tua rẽu chín taam sang) : thin, sour curry with Mudfish and vegetables (whole fish or fish steaks)
kaeng sôm plaa châwn yâwt máphráo àwn (pen tua rẽu chín taam sang) : thin, sour curry with Mudfish and coconut (whole fish or fish steaks)
pó tàek : “burst fishtrap” soup // seafood medley soup
tôm yam ruam míit tháleh (mâw fai) : sour and spicy soup with assorted seafood (served in a firepot)
tôm yam kûng sài hèt (náam sãi) : sour and spicy soup with shrimp and mushrooms (clear broth)
tôm yam kûng yâwt máphráo àwn (náam sãi) : sour and spicy soup with shrimp and young coconut (clear broth)
tôm yam plaa châwn (náam sãi) : sour and spicy soup with Mudfish (clear broth)
tôm khàa kài : galangal (Alpinia galanga), chicken, and coconut milk soup
tôm yam khãa mũu : sour and spicy soup with pork leg meat
tôm khlông plaa châwn (bàep chin) : lightly sour soup with Mudfish, lime leaves, and lemongrass
tôm khàa plaa salìit : galangal (Alpinia galanga), Gouramy fish, and coconut milk soup
tôm khàa ruam míit tháleh : galangal (Alpinia galanga), assorted seafood, and coconut milk soup
kaeng khûa kûng kàp sàppàrót : rich, mellow curry with shrimp, pineapple, and tomato
kaeng pàa kûng sòt : “jungle” curry // spicy, herb and vegetable curry with shrimp
kaeng pàa lûuk chín plaa kraay : “jungle” curry // spicy, herb and vegetable curry with homemade fishballs
kaeng khĩaw-wãan kài : green curry with chicken
kaeng khĩaw-wãan mũu : green curry with pork
kaeng phèt pèt yâang : spicy roasted duck curry
kaeng pàa mũu : “jungle” curry // spicy, herb and vegetable curry with pork
kaeng pàa néua tìt man : “jungle” curry // spicy, herb and vegetable curry with beef
kaeng phánaeng kài : mild, savoury, and thick curry with chicken
kaeng phánaeng néua : mild, savoury, and thick curry with beef
kaeng phánaeng mũu : mild, savoury, and thick curry with pork
kaeng kàrìi kài : yellow curry with chicken

More to follow shortly...

E.M.

ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTO LINKS.
Last edited by Erik M. on January 30th 2007, 10:09pm, edited 6 times in total.
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#27
Posted May 15th 2006, 8:48pm
For my edification: how can a place have so many menu items?!? How can the kitchen be prepared to turn out whatever someone might order from a thousand choices?!? Let alone the kitchen of a storefront restaurant?

I've been to Spoon and I know it's good. I don't doubt that they can do this. I just don't know how. But I bet somebody here does.

I understand that many dishes on this menu are variations on a theme, rather than being completely separate from one another--but still!
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#28
Posted May 15th 2006, 9:08pm
riddlemay wrote:For my edification: how can a place have so many menu items?!? How can the kitchen be prepared to turn out whatever someone might order from a thousand choices?!?


It is not at all unlike an American diner which serves numerous variations of omelettes, pancakes, egg platters, sandwiches, etc.

E.M.
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#29
Posted May 17th 2006, 10:49am
Thank you, Erik, for spurring me to finally feel confident enough to try Spoon Thai. I was nervous taking kids there, but it was fantastic! I mean, the food was truly spectacular. We went last Satuday for lunch and would have gone back the next day if we could have!

Our server gave us both the translated Thai menu and the regular English menu, and we were able to order from both so that the two adults (my husband and me) and two kids (our sons ages 3 & 1) could happily enjoy the meal. The kids had the cucumber salid with steamed white rice and gorgeous chicken satay with peanut sauce (of course the little one can't have peanut sauce yet but he loved the chicken!). Later, we got them some pad thai but they were so full they couldn't eat it. They loved it reheated at home the next night.

My husband and I were thrilled with everything we ordered:
sâi kràwk isãan : grilled Isaan-style pork and rice sausage, served with chile, ginger, and peanuts
hàw mòk plaa dùk (tham eng) : steamed Catfish and coconut milk “custard”
kha-náa mũu kràwp : Chinese broccoli stir-fried with crispy pork


We also ordered the sliced pork neck salad. I can't tell which one it was from your translated menu, but it was served on a bed of lettuce leaves, with large slices of juicy pork neck (rather than the minced chicken or slivers of beef we have had in salads with a similar name -- some version of Larb Nar? -- at more Americanized Thai restaurants).

Our favorite was the catfish "custard" (wow!) although I am having trouble forgetting the slightly fermented flavor of those delicious rice sausage balls. I can't wait to go back!

Here is what I am thinking we will order next time (in addition to our two new favorites and something for the kids), but I want to get your opinions on whether it would be the right way to go to move further into authentic, delicious discovery of Thai cuisine.

The next time we MUST try the following:
khâo phàt plaa salìd : rice fried with Gouramy fish
yam hũa plii : banana blossom salad with poached chicken, shrimp, coconut milk, and chile jam

And the time after that we have to try:
khâo khlûk kà-pì : shrimp paste rice with sliced omelette, slivered green apple, dried shrimp, and sweet pork
yam hèt khẽm thawng : enoki mushroom salad with roasted rice powder

And for my husband, the soup lover:
tôm khàa plaa salìd : galangal (Alpinia galanga), Gouramy fish, and coconut milk soup

What do you think?

Cheers,
Susan
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"Whatever you are, be a good one." -Abraham Lincoln
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#30
Posted May 17th 2006, 11:44am
Susan wrote:What do you think?


I think that you have great taste. :wink:

Seriously, though, I am very impressed with your adventuresome spirit.

If your husband really likes soups (and if he is also game for a fair bit of heat) have him try the tôm khlông plaa châwn, which is a lightly sour soup with Mudfish steaks, lime leaves, and lemongrass. That is one of my favourites at Spoon.

And, Susan, on a separate visit, I would encourage you to try the sour curry & pork omelette combination:

kaeng sôm kûng sòt (thin and “sour” tamarind-flavoured curry with fresh shrimp, Napa cabbage, and daikon radish)

khài jiaw mũu sàp (Thai-style omelette with minced pork)

When accompanied by plain steamed rice, that particular combination is transcendent.*

Regards,
E.M.

* Additional commentary on this pairing can be found here.
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