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Rosded (Thai Language Menu Translation)

Rosded (Thai Language Menu Translation)
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  • Rosded (Thai Language Menu Translation)

    Post #1 - May 11th, 2006, 2:16 pm
    Post #1 - May 11th, 2006, 2:16 pm Post #1 - May 11th, 2006, 2:16 pm
    It is finally time that I come clean about Rosded.

    Rosded was one of the first Thai restaurants in Chicago that I visited--circa 1989-90--and it has been a favourite of mine throughout the years. A lot of my Thai friends also like the place, and there is little reason to wonder why -- Rosded produces a great many dishes which are authentically Thai in taste and appearance.

    My most frequent orders at Rosded include kũay tĩaw reua (“boat noodles” with sliced beef and meatballs), sômtam puu (papaya salad with pickled crab), phla kûng (shrimp salad with red onion, mint, and chile jam), yen ta fo (spicy and sweet noodle soup with seafood), hãwy thâwt rót phàt thai (mussel omelette with “phàt thai” seasonings), plaa CATFISH náam phrík kaeng daeng (battered fish filets with red curry sauce), plaa phàt tâo jîaw (fish stir-fried with yellow bean sauce), and phàt phrík khĩng mũu (spicy pork stir-fry).

    Here is my translation of the Rosded Thai language menu:

    ROSDED THAI MENU TRANSLATION (2005)

    jaan bao riak náam yoi : light dishes*

    sà-té mũu - kài - néua : grilled meat skewers served with peanut sauce (pork, chicken, beef)
    tâo-hûu thâwt : deep-fried tofu with a house dipping sauce
    thâwt man : fried fish cakes
    khanõm jìip thâwt reũ nêung : Chinese-style dumplings (fried or steamed)
    paw pía thâwt : fried spring rolls
    paw pía sòt : fresh spring rolls
    mìi kràwp - kûng sòt : deep-fried mung bean noodles a shrimp and sweet sauce
    kûng láwt : fresh shrimp egg rolls
    kíaw sâa : “gyoza” // potstickers
    lûuk chín néua - mũu pîng : grilled beef (or pork) skewers

    sâep mâak sâep náwy : salads

    sômtam thai – puu - kûng (plaa raa) : papaya salad with peanuts, crab, or shrimp (fermented fish sauce extra)
    yam tháleh : mixed seafood salad
    lâap mũu - néua - - kài : minced meat and herb salad with pork, beef, or chicken
    yam wún sên : a spicy and sour salad with warm mung bean noodles and minced pork
    phla kûng : shrimp salad with red onion, mint, and chile jam
    mũu má-nao – néua má-nao : seared pork/beef loin salad with garlic, lime juice, and fish sauce
    kài thâwt : Thai-style fried chicken with dipping sauce
    yam néua – yam mũu : spicy beef or pork salad with cucumber, tomato, and onion
    néua náam tòk – mũu náam tòk : “waterfall” beef/pork // grilled beef/pork salad with roasted rice powder
    nãem sòt : sour and spicy Northern Thai-style salad with minced chicken or pork
    yam plaa mèuk : spicy and tangy squid salad
    yam mũu yâw : salad with steamed pork sausage, lime juice, and garlic
    kao-lao mũu yâw : salad with steamed pork sausage, steamed beansprouts, and steamed Chinese broccoli
    khâo nĩaw : sticky rice

    kũay tĩaw tàng tàang : assorted noodles

    kao-lao mũu tôm yam : spicy and sour soup with pork (w/o noodles)
    kũay tĩaw reua mũu – néua : “boat” noodles with pork or beef
    kũay tĩaw pèt : rice noodle soup with braised duck, in a sweet and salty broth
    yen ta fo : rice noodles with assorted vegetables and seafood in a thin, spicy, tomato-flavoured broth
    kũay jáp : rich pork and pork offal soup with “rice flake” noodles
    phàt thai : thin rice noodles s/f with shrimp, beansprouts, and egg
    kũay tĩaw râat nâa : rice noodles braised with Chinese broccoli, yellow bean “gravy,” and c/o/m
    kũay tĩaw phàt khîi mao : “drunkard’s” noodles // wide rice noodles stir-fried with chile, basil, and c/o/m
    kũay tĩaw khãa mũu : rice noodle soup with pork leg meat
    râat nâa khîi mao : wide rice noodles braised in yellow bean “gravy” with vegetables, chile, and c/o/m
    kao-lao néua – mũu : minced beef or pork soup with beansprouts and Chinese broccoli (w/o noodles)
    kũay tĩaw tôm yam mũu sàp : rice noodles and minced pork and seafood in a sweet, spicy broth
    bà-mìi pèt – mũu daeng (hâeng – náam) : egg noodles with duck or bbq pork (“wet” or “dry”)
    kíaw náam mũu daeng : wonton soup with bbq pork
    kũay tĩaw krà-phrao kài - mũu – néua : rice noodles s/f with holy basil and chicken, pork, or beef
    phàt sii-yú : wide rice noodles braised with soy sauce and c/o/m
    kũay tĩaw néua sàp – mũu sàp - kài sàp : rice noodles s/f with minced beef, pork, or chicken
    kũay tĩaw khàek kài – néua : rice noodles in a spicy, rich, coconut milk broth with chicken or beef
    kũay tĩaw khûa kài : wide rice noodles stir-fried with chicken, green onions, and egg, served over lettuce
    bà-mìi hâeng puu : egg noodles s/f with crab meat

    tôm yam tham kaeng jèut : soups

    tôm sâep : Isaan-style spicy and sour soup
    tôm khrêuang nai : spicy and sour soup with pork offal
    tôm yam kûng – kài : spicy and sour soup with shrimp or chicken
    tôm yam khãa mũu : spicy and sour soup with pork leg meat
    kaeng jèut tâo-hûu mũu sàp : “bland soup” with tofu and minced pork
    ehn tûun – néua tûun : rich, star anise-flavoured soup with beef tendon or sliced beef
    tèua huan : pickled cabbage and pork offal in a delicate sour broth
    pó tàek : “burst fishtrap” soup // seafood medley soup
    tôm khàa kài : galangal, chicken, and coconut milk soup
    kaeng jèut wún sên : “bland soup” with mung bean noodles

    khâo jaan dìaw : rice plates**

    khâo phàt puu : crab fried rice
    khâo phàt sàppàrót : pineapple fried rice
    khâo khãa mũu : sliced red-braised pork hock, served over rice
    khâo mũu daeng : sliced bbq pork, served w/ rice
    khâo krà-phrao pèt : roasted duck s/f with holy basil, served over rice
    khâo phàt phrík mũu – néua – kài (kûng 5.95) : fried rice with chile and pork, beef, chicken, or shrimp
    khâo krà-thiam phrík thai (kûng 6.95) : garlic and black pepper stir-fry with c/o/m, served w/ rice
    hãwy thâwt rót dèt : “Rosded” fried mussel omelette
    khâo phàt mũu – néua – kài (kûng 5.95) : fried rice with pork, beef, chicken, or shrimp
    khâo phàt nãem : fried rice with Northern Thai-style “pressed ham”
    khâo nâa pèt : roasted duck and garlic-flavoured “gravy,” served over rice
    khâo krà-phrao néua – kài – mũu (kûng 5.95) : holy basil s/f with beef, chicken, pork, or shrimp, served w/ rice
    khâo krà-phrao khãa mũu : holy basil s/f with pork leg meat, served w/ rice
    khâo phàt phrík khĩng : sweet and spicy fried rice with c/o/m
    khâo mòk kài : Southern Thai-style chicken “biryani” // aromatic chicken and rice
    hãwy thâwt rót phàt thai : mussel omelette fried with beansprouts and powdered chile

    kàp khâo tàang : assorted dishes with rice

    plaa dùk phàt phèt : spicy curry fry with catfish
    plaa mèuk phàt phèt : spicy curry fry with squid
    plaa CATFISH náam phrík kaeng daeng : breaded/fried catfish steaks with red curry sauce
    plaa thâwt râat phrík (FILLET) : fried fish “smothered” in sweet chile sauce
    phánaeng mũu – néua – kài (kûng 8.25) : mild, savoury, and thick curry with pork, beef, chicken, or shrimp
    kaeng pàa mũu – néua – kài (kûng 7.25) : “jungle” curry // spicy vegetable curry with c/o/m [no coconut milk]
    kaeng phèt pèt yâang : red curry with five-spice roasted duck
    kaeng khĩaw-wãan lûuk chín plaa kraay : spicy green curry fry with housemade fish balls
    phàt prîaw wãan : sweet and sour stir-fry with c/o/m
    pèt yâang : five-spice roasted duck
    mũu krà-thiam phrík thai : pork s/f with garlic and black pepper
    phàt krà-phrao mũu - kài – néua : holy basil s/f with pork, chicken, or beef
    plaa phàt tâo jîaw : fish fried with yellow bean sauce
    phàt kha-náa náam man hãwy : Chinese broccoli stir-fried with oyster sauce
    kaeng mátsàman kài – néua : “Muslim” curry // mild, cardamom and cumin-flavoured curry with chicken or beef
    kaeng sôm phàk ruam kûng : “sour” curry with shrimp and assorted vegetables [no coconut milk]
    plaa dùk thâwt kràwp phàt phèt : spicy curry fry with crispy Catfish
    plaa CATFISH sãam rót : deep-fried catfish with “three-flavoured” sauce
    plaa krà-phong râat phrík : seabass “smothered” in garlic, chile, and onions
    plaa salmâwn sãam rót : salmon with “three-flavoured” sauce
    phánaeng lûuk chín plaa kraay : mild, savoury, and thick curry with housemade fish balls
    kaeng phèt mũu – néua – kài : spicy red curry with pork, beef, or chicken
    kaeng khĩaw-wãan mũu – néua – kài : green curry with pork, beef, or chicken
    kaeng pàa lûuk chín plaa kraay : “jungle” curry with housemade fishballs [no coconut milk]

    phàt phàk ruam míit : stir-fried mixed vegetables
    khãa mũu : sliced red-braised pork hock
    phàt phrík khĩng mũu (pèt) : chile and ginger stir-fry with pork or duck
    phàt krà-chai lûuk chín plaa kraay : housemade fish balls s/f with wild ginger
    phàt tháleh ruam míit : stir-fry with assorted seafood
    khài sàwt sâi krà-phrao mũu – kài : stuffed omelette with stir-fried minced chicken (or pork) and holy basil
    krà-phrao pèt : roasted duck s/f with holy basil

    khlaai ráwn phàwn kra-thaai : thirst quenchers

    oh-líang : sweetened iced coffee [no milk]
    náam khĩaw – daeng : club soda with green or red Hale's™ flavouring syrup
    náam lam yài : longanfruit juice
    kaafae yèn – chaa yèn – chaa dam yèn : Thai iced coffee, Thai iced tea, iced black tea
    nom yen : sweetened iced milk with green or red Hale's™ flavouring syrup

    khâo nĩaw má-mûang (taam réudoo kaal) : sticky rice with coconut crème and mango (seasonal availability)

    Rosded
    2308 W. Leland Ave.
    773.334.9055

    E.M.

    ORIGINAL POST EDITED TO INSERT PHOTO LINKS.

    * AT THE TOP OF PAGE ONE:

    Image

    ** AT THE TOP OF PAGE TWO:

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    Last edited by Erik M. on September 5th, 2006, 6:59 pm, edited 10 times in total.
  • Post #2 - May 11th, 2006, 2:40 pm
    Post #2 - May 11th, 2006, 2:40 pm Post #2 - May 11th, 2006, 2:40 pm
    I was first introduced to Rosded in about 1982 or 83 by a Thai friend. I asked her to take me to a restaurant where she and her family ate. It was my favorite for many years. Since then, dozens of new Thai restaurants have opened, and I have completely ignored Rosded. Thanks for reminding me, I will have to go there again "for old times sake". I discovered ba-mi noodles there, which became one of my favorites.
  • Post #3 - May 31st, 2006, 11:02 pm
    Post #3 - May 31st, 2006, 11:02 pm Post #3 - May 31st, 2006, 11:02 pm
    Image

    One of the conundrums of life in Chicago is why it's so hard to find a good Chinese restaurant (outside of either Chinatown)-- or a bad Thai one, anywhere.

    Rosded is probably the most grandmotherly place I've been to since this one. The slight musty smell, the prints under the plexiglass table covers, the circa 1970 Naugahyde chairs, and the counter which (save for the Thai wings on the end) looks like it belonged to the previous inhabitant of the space, Das Schnitzel Hutt-- if you'd run into these things in a Chinese restaurant you'd know you were in for the worst kind of 1960s Cantonese experience (more Magic Chef Bouillon Starter in your egg foo young gravy, sir?). By all rights, as possibly the oldest surviving Thai restaurant in Chicago, Rosded ought to be the Orange Garden of Thai. And yet everything at Rosded was pretty good, and a couple of things were damned good, homey Thai grandma food that hit the spot just fine.

    We couldn't remember what Erik's favorites were, so we just ordered a bunch of old favorites of our own:

    Image

    Cucumber salad, something I rarely see any more since I rarely order the chicken satay it invariably accompanies.

    Image

    This was my favorite thing, néua má-nao. A beef salad, tender beef and a great limey-fishy-garlicky sauce. This made me very happy.

    Image

    Thai fried chicken, kài thâwt, was pretty good. They started out giving us a gringo sweet sauce, but we asked for something more Thai and got something with more kick to it. It wasn't as good as Spoon's, but it wasn't bad.

    Image

    Spring rolls. I don't know why these were ordered. They were... spring rolls.

    Image

    The pork bamee/bà-mìi I thought would have been better with pork with a little more of a barbecue kick; the pork was a little cafeteria-bland. But it all worked together nicely with the noodles.

    Rosded proves, if you're going to eat at Grandma's, make sure she's Thai. I'll be back for more of her cooking.
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  • Post #4 - June 2nd, 2006, 9:52 am
    Post #4 - June 2nd, 2006, 9:52 am Post #4 - June 2nd, 2006, 9:52 am
    I am very excited about this translation. My wife, son and I frequent Rosded. It is Thai comfort food. I have one quick question on the translation. Some of the dishes have "c/o/m" in them. What is that? Forgive me if it is obvious, and I am just completely missing it. I have not had my requisite coffee today. Thanks.
  • Post #5 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:31 am
    Post #5 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:31 am Post #5 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:31 am
    schenked wrote:Some of the dishes have "c/o/m" in them. What is that?
    Choice of meat.
  • Post #6 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:58 am
    Post #6 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:58 am Post #6 - June 2nd, 2006, 11:58 am
    Choice of meat.


    See. I knew it should have been obvious to me. Thanks.
  • Post #7 - June 4th, 2006, 10:54 am
    Post #7 - June 4th, 2006, 10:54 am Post #7 - June 4th, 2006, 10:54 am
    Mike G wrote:This was my favorite thing, néua má-nao. A beef salad, tender beef and a great limey-fishy-garlicky sauce.

    Mike,

    Néua má-nao was very good, as was the rest of lunch and, yes, I do admit I occasionally have a taste for spring rolls. :) In fact, I so enjoyed our lunch I went back a few days later with MAG and Thor.

    Armed with Erik's translation I ordered a few items that, even though I've been going to Rosded on and off for years, was not aware were available.*

    phla kûng** (shrimp salad with red onion, mint, and chile jam)
    Image

    plaa CATFISH náam phrík kaeng daeng (breaded/fried catfish steaks with red curry sauce)
    Image

    We also had the terrific néua má-nao, kài thâwt (Thai fried chicken) and Thor's special request of steamed rice noodle.

    Thor w/rice noodle
    Image

    Combining lunch at Rosded with a visit to the Thai store, one door West, or any of the interesting, and within walking distance, food shops such as Bouffe, The Cheese Stands Alone, Joe The Sausage King or Meyer's Deli make for a nice couple of hours.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    *Even though I know my way around a Thai menu Erik's translated menus open doors that would not only remain closed, but invisible. I really don't think we, as a community, can thank Erik enough for his efforts

    **Spoon Thai makes a killer version of phla kûng
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #8 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:32 am
    Post #8 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:32 am Post #8 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:32 am
    LTH,

    Four of us had a lovely mid afternoon lunch at Rosded, a delightful mix of Thai/Thai and American/Thai that, almost, made us forget the 100 degree heat. Highlights were Pla Dook Tod Krob, which was suggested as an alternative to plaa CATFISH náam phrík kaeng daeng (breaded/fried catfish steaks with red curry sauce). Pla Dook Tod Krob, (nuggets of crisp all the way through skin-on catfish with a coat of red curry w/French green beans). The dish was perfectly suited to my taste, crispy, spicy, power packed with flavor.

    Ka Moo Pad Ka-Prow was recommended by a friend of Erik's we ran into. Pork leg that was braised then lightly griddled before service, drying it out a bit and adding structure. A very nice dish, thanks for the recommendation Jade.

    We also had phla kûng (shrimp salad with red onion, mint, and chile jam), Thai fried chicken and Thai style fried rice with the addition of fried egg and a terrific Somtam Thai (papaya salad) with dried shrimp and bits of crisp fried pork skin.

    The American/Thai portion of the meal was rounded out with very good Pad Thai and fresh Spring Rolls. While I've been going to, and have always liked, Rosded, for years, maybe decades, in the last few months I've begun to see the real beauty of the place thanks, in no small part, to Erik's translated menu efforts.

    After lunch we stopped at Bouffe, bought a few Salt Caramels, which we ate on the spot, now I see what all the fuss was about. The Salt Caramel info, which have a picture of a person raking salt, are written in tiny script on clear paper making it impossible for me to say what brand etc. They were not coated and look much like thaiobsessed delicious efforts in the linked thread. Call Bouffe before heading over for salt caramels, we may have got the last few.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #9 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:49 am
    Post #9 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:49 am Post #9 - August 2nd, 2006, 7:49 am
    Rosded is my "corner Thai place," and I've been going there for years (usually for take-out on my way home from the L) - I didn't even know they had a special menu. You can be sure I'll be picking up something special for dinner tonight! Thanks so much for providing this translation! :)
  • Post #10 - August 2nd, 2006, 8:59 am
    Post #10 - August 2nd, 2006, 8:59 am Post #10 - August 2nd, 2006, 8:59 am
    Akatonbo wrote:Thanks so much for providing this translation! :)


    With any luck it will be there by the time you arrive. ;)

    In all seriousness, though, I just spoke with the owner and the head waiter while dining at the restaurant with friends, last night. I promised them that I would drop off a copy of my completed translation within the next couple of days. To be on the safe side, print and carry your own copy today.

    The staff might have some difficulty with my transliterations at first, so be sure to have the original Thai menu in hand, as well. The items on my translation perfectly correspond as long as you can distinguish the front of the menu from the back. :wink:

    E.M.
  • Post #11 - August 2nd, 2006, 2:44 pm
    Post #11 - August 2nd, 2006, 2:44 pm Post #11 - August 2nd, 2006, 2:44 pm
    FWIW, I dropped off one copy of my menu translation at Rosded this noon. That will have to suffice for the time being. So, if you visit Rosded at some point in the near future, please, be a pal and leave the menu where you found it. If I had a dollar for each and every menu translation that has been boosted from the various restaurants I furnish, well, I might actually be able to make a dent in my printing costs. :shock:

    And, if you would like a copy of the menu in the form of a MS Word document contact me via p.m. and I'll send you an attachment.

    E.M.
  • Post #12 - July 28th, 2007, 9:46 am
    Post #12 - July 28th, 2007, 9:46 am Post #12 - July 28th, 2007, 9:46 am
    G Wiv wrote:Highlights were Pla Dook Tod Krob, which was suggested as an alternative to plaa CATFISH náam phrík kaeng daeng (breaded/fried catfish steaks with red curry sauce).

    Rosded's Pla Dook Tod Krob is quickly becoming one of my favorite dishes. Ultra crisp skin-on catfish with intense granular red curry paste, clear clean flavor of fresh beans providing counterpoint while still in keeping with the snap/crunch of the chicharones like catfish.

    Rosded's Pla Dook Tod Krob (7.27.07)
    Image

    Close up crisp-cam.
    Image

    Rosded has one of the better versions of Pad Thai, not overly sweet with nice balance.

    Pad Thai
    Image

    Jazzfood had purchased Thai peanuts next door at PNA which he, in a brilliant move, strew atop the Pad Thai adding crunch and additional flavor.

    Thai Peanuts from PNA
    Image

    Steve Z, the third in our lunch trio, suggested Red curry with 5-spice roasted duck (Kaeng Phet Pet Yang), no surprise as Steve is notorious for his love of all things duck.

    Kaeng Phet Pet Yang (Red curry with 5-spice roasted duck)
    Image

    We rounded out our lunch with Phla Kung (Shrimp salad w/red onion, mint and chile jam) and a few orders of sticky rice.

    Phla Kung (Shrimp salad w/red onion, mint and chili jam)
    Image

    After our delicious and inexpensive lunch at Rosded Steve and I first wandered into Bouffe, which had recently changed hands, and then PNA, a tiny Thai shop with a wide array of offerings, everything from videos to prepared food items. I picked up a container of Thai peanuts, lovely peanut crunch factor enlivened by dots of crisp fried lemon grass and Thai basil.

    I also purchased Luk Chup (mung bean candy) in surprisingly realistic shapes, I almost expected the jalapeno to be spicy.

    Luk Chup (mung bean candy)
    Image

    Crunchy chili crab were impossible to resist. They seem to like the Luk Chup. :)

    Image

    Leland/Western is a true LTH nexus, with Rosded, PNA, Bouffe, Spoon Thai, The Cheese Stands Alone, Meyer's Sausage soon to reopen as Gene's and Lincoln Quality Meat Market all in close proximity.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Rosded
    2308 W. Leland Ave
    Chicago, IL
    773-334-9055

    PNA
    2310 W. Leland Ave
    Chicago, IL
    773-784-1797
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - November 7th, 2007, 5:57 pm
    Post #13 - November 7th, 2007, 5:57 pm Post #13 - November 7th, 2007, 5:57 pm
    Rosded was the site of my first Thai meal ever. Hallowed ground. But ground to which I had not managed to return since the late 70s, when that first visit took place. Living temporarily only blocks away, I was moved yesterday to vary my Spoon routine and make my Proustian way back to the place where I first tasted fish sauce, sriracha, etc.
    Back then, it was truly a hole in the wall. The waxed table cloths were a bit sticky, the assorted condiments on each table unlabeled, mysterious, and simultaneously threatening and beckoning.
    Today the place is neat as a pin and cozy as a London tea shop.
    At 6:00 there were 3 other tables seated, and we were welcomed with easy, genuine hospitality.
    I am just recovering from a bronchitis which may form the basis for another post on hospital food, and which made me crave soup last night.
    The current menu has all the (now) mainstream standards, but also many additional things and less common variations on those standards, so that it is ultimately about twice as big as the standard Thai storefront menu. (E.g. catfish in 2 different preps: lime sauce, and a green apple-and-something sauce, which both sounded worth exploring to me.)
    Nothing jumps out as extraordinary in the Spoon/TAC way of one-bite salad, Issan sausage, or pork neck larb, but there is much of interest.
    And based on what we had, I'd say the kitchen is probably capable of handling a well-informed special request.
    Sadly, we did not tax them overmuch. I was barely standing and simply craved soup. Mrs. B. cannot get enough of 2 things in life: creme brulee, and pad thai. Master B. only wants "soup noodles" and white rice.
    What makes such an unintesting meal worth the posting is one extra dish, and the fact that all of the above were distinctly above average.
    We started with pot stickers. Standard issue, but freshly done, piping hot and very good.
    Master B's special request for broth and noodles ONLY (no meat, no "flecks"), was cheerfully honored. And the soup was mild, but not monochromatic. Very pleasant indeed. The egg noodles perfectly toothsome.
    I had Tom Kha. The $5.95 portion was very generous. There were slices of green chili, as well as plentiful evidence of red chili, together producing a very well-proportioned heat to balance the richness of the coconut milk. Again, it wasn't a different idea form others, just very well done. Master B. gave it a game try (which he is very good about) and pronounced it a revelation in his young life and promptly began alternating servings of his soup, and mine.
    Mrs. B's pad thai looked like any other but again, it was better. Not the blandly sweet pile of slightly sticky noodles one often gets. It was nutty, noodles perfectly done, very nicely sweet/sour, and, according to Mrs. B., the taste/texture of the tofu were, in her experience, exceptional. Not the usual bits of kitchen sponge, but silky and altogether better.
    Then came the dish that makes me suspect there may be lovely unexplored depths to Rosded's kitchen.
    It is just called "roast chicken" on the menu. But a heaping platter of bone-in pieces arrived absolutely sizzling fresh from the oven (we were warned of a 30-min. cooking time, which seemed like a good sign) and coated in a really terrific sauce whose main notes were black pepper and garlic. Also I assume some fish sauce and have no idea what else, because all was merged in something really earthy and marvelous and way beyond the screaming of loud individual notes.
    I wish I had more dishes to report on, but I will say that the place was neat, friendly, cozy, with unobtrusively good service, a large, interesting menu, and everything on it still in the $6.95 range. Absolutely well worth exploring.

    Rosded
    2308 W. Leland
    773/334-9055
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #14 - November 7th, 2007, 6:24 pm
    Post #14 - November 7th, 2007, 6:24 pm Post #14 - November 7th, 2007, 6:24 pm
    My wife and I love to stop at Roseded for a late lunch when we visit Merz Apothecary around the corner. I agree with mrbarolo, it doesn't necessarily dazzle, but always satisfies.
  • Post #15 - November 7th, 2007, 9:09 pm
    Post #15 - November 7th, 2007, 9:09 pm Post #15 - November 7th, 2007, 9:09 pm
    Rosded was the first place I ever had laab kai...in the mid-90's

    a memorable version
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #16 - November 7th, 2007, 9:38 pm
    Post #16 - November 7th, 2007, 9:38 pm Post #16 - November 7th, 2007, 9:38 pm
    It is just called "roast chicken" on the menu. But a heaping platter of bone-in pieces arrived absolutely sizzling fresh from the oven (we were warned of a 30-min. cooking time, which seemed like a good sign) and coated in a really terrific sauce whose main notes were black pepper and garlic. Also I assume some fish sauce and have no idea what else, because all was merged in something really earthy and marvelous and way beyond the screaming of loud individual notes.


    I have always loved their roast chicken. It is the epitome of Thai comfort food. Especially as the weather turns cold, I feel drawn to Rosded and that peppery chicken goodness.
  • Post #17 - December 29th, 2010, 4:58 pm
    Post #17 - December 29th, 2010, 4:58 pm Post #17 - December 29th, 2010, 4:58 pm
    I finally made it to Rosded for lunch today and was quite impressed. I had a simple curry rice with chicken that hit all of the right notes. I look forward to going back, esp with a copy of the translated menu.
  • Post #18 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:34 pm
    Post #18 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:34 pm Post #18 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:34 pm
    It's been less than one week since I returned from three weeks in Thailand and Cambodia, and strangely, I've been craving more Thai food since the moment I landed at O'Hare airport. Yet until lunch today, I had not had Thai food in about a week (perhaps the longest I've gone without eating Thai food in a number of years).

    So I wanted to make sure my first US based Thai meal in some time was perfect. I chose Rosded . . . they've never once let me down. Today was no exception. I ordered two items: basil omelet with chicken and jungle curry (kaeng paa) with chicken (the latter ordered "phet phet" = Thai spicy). Here they are:

    Image
    basil omelet with chicken


    Image
    jungle curry (kaeng paa) with chicken

    As expected, both items were outstanding. I absolutely love the Thai omelet, and I don't believe you'll find a better rendition than the one at Rosded. The jungle curry was extremely spicy and flavorful, the perfect remedy for a disgustingly cold Chicago day. Thanks Rosded for both welcoming me home and making me feel as if I was back in Thailand, all at the very same time. It's easy when you're in this neck of the woods to ignore Rosded for some of the other great neighborhood Thai restaurants --- a very bad move. You'd be wise to add it to your rotation.

    It is also worth noting that while there is an Erik M. translation for Rosded's Thai menu on this site, I was told that the Thai menu is almost identical to the regular menu offered at the restaurant, but for the offal selections. I haven't compared the two menus, but both of the items I ordered today are on the regular menu.
  • Post #19 - February 11th, 2011, 8:26 am
    Post #19 - February 11th, 2011, 8:26 am Post #19 - February 11th, 2011, 8:26 am
    I love this restaurant! It's the best thai restaurant around, I've been going since I was a kid and I still go now.
  • Post #20 - November 18th, 2011, 12:18 am
    Post #20 - November 18th, 2011, 12:18 am Post #20 - November 18th, 2011, 12:18 am
    April 26, 2008. That was the first time -- and until earlier this week -- the last time I ate at Rosded Thai. On that day, I had a perfectly enjoyable lunch but for whatever reason, Rosded soon after fell off my radar. So, when BR arranged a dinner at Rosded this past Tuesday, I jumped at the chance to join in. I had fond memories of my last meal there and was excited about the prospect of dining there with a larger group and trying a bunch of different dishes. At BR's request, Tom, the owner, prepared a few off-menu dishes for us and BR took care of the rest . . .

    Image
    Rosded Thai - 2308 W. Leland, Chicago


    Image
    Pad Thai Pork
    Respectable version of a dish I almost never order on my own. I'm a pad see ewe guy, myself. :wink:


    Image
    Seafood Soup
    Menu description: spicy and sour seafood combination with mushrooms, lemongrass, citrus leaf, lime juice, onions and chili sauce.


    Image
    Nam Prik Ong
    One of my favorites of the meal. From what I could tell it was ground pork, tomatoes, garlic, and chilis. I don't think this is on the menu.


    Image
    Nam Prik Ong
    Accoutrements served with the dip.


    Image
    Green Curry Pork
    Tender chunks of pork in green curry with Thai eggplant, green beans and bamboo shoots.


    Image
    Shrimp Salad
    Acidic and funky preparation of cooked, cold shrimp that I don't believe is on the menu.


    Image
    Fishballs
    These little off-menu nuggets -- made in house -- were light, delicate and flavorful.


    Image
    Chicken Larb-type Item
    This was larb-like but not exactly a larb. The grind actually reminded me of pad kra pao -- and it was acidic and funky like a larb -- but it wasn't quite a larb. The addition of asparagus was very interesting. From what I can tell, this is not on the menu.


    Image
    Braised Hamhock
    I don't think this is on the menu but it was essentially tender, unctuous chunks of pork hock.


    Image
    Panang Catfish
    Menu description: Crispy pieces of fried catfish topped with hot spicy thick sauce. This was another one of my favorites of the night. I loved the ultra-crispy catfish and the thick curry paste was intense, delectable and compelling.

    All in all, it was a very tasty meal and I'd like to return to give the menu -- and whatever off-menu items I can coax up -- futher exploration. I think that with a few visits and some pleasurable digging, there are some real treasures to be discovered here, above and beyond the ones we enjoyed at this fine meal.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #21 - November 18th, 2011, 8:56 am
    Post #21 - November 18th, 2011, 8:56 am Post #21 - November 18th, 2011, 8:56 am
    I hope this thread is officially awake now. As usual, great pictures Ronnie. I thought the meal at Rosded was quite good, and very typical of the quality and type of food you can expect there, and that's a good thing. Aroy, Spoon, Rosded and Sticky Rice are all so close to one another and on any given night, you can find a few of your Thai favorites at one of them, and what's great is that all four offer vastly different menu items.

    The phat Thai, a dish I had never had at Rosded before this dinner, was a very respectable version. When done correctly, the dish is a little savory, with sweet and sour balancing one another, and overall the dish is not sweet (good luck finding that in Chicago) The version at Rosded I tasted Tuesday night was the closest I've come (thanks Stevez). Many places in Thailand (you can find it on every street in Bangkok) throw a whole fried egg on top of the finished dish and I found that I loved that method - if I order phat Thai at Rosded again, that's what I'll request.

    Nam phrik ong (along with its green sibling nam phrik num) is a typical Northern Thai dish, always served with vegetables and crispy pork rinds for dipping, and is hugely popular in Chiang Mai. It's not on the menu at Rosded, but I've had it multiple times at Rosded and they do a very nice version of this dish (think slightly spicy Bolognese). You can always ask Tom at Rosded if they have this when you're there (he's a big fan so I suspect you can get it more often than not).

    I believe the shrimp salad in Ronnie's picture is the same on the translated menu and pictured and described above in this thread (phla kung).

    I liked the soup we had, but I prefer Rosded's Jungle Curry (pictured above in the thread) and it's really as much a soup as any soup on their menu. On a cold Chicago night, it will warm you up very quickly.

    Tom indicated the larb-type dish is a typical Southern Thai dish, but that in Thailand they typically use bitter melon (Rosded used asparagus). According to Tom, the bitter melon would have been unpleasantly sour and even more offensive than the often maligned durian, and that even he doesn't like to eat the dish with bitter melon. In any event, I thought it was very good and very similar to the filling in the omelet I pictured above (but I do want to at least try it with bitter melon).

    The catfish with red curry in Ronnie's picture is the same one described and pictured above and it really is terrific. When preparing the dish for customers, they adjust the heat in their red curry paste to taste, so request "phet phet" if you want it spicy (the normal heat level is relatively mild). I also really enjoyed the rich, fatty hamhock (this might be the kha muu listed on Erik M's translation above) and the fish balls (made in house) too. As for the green curry, I liked it but prefer other versions in town more.

    Not ordered, but also excellent at Rosded, include the som tam ... if you want it funky, ask for the pickled crab (but be warned, it's really fishy/funky). I attempted to order the mussel omelet, another great dish at Rosded. However, Tom said they were not happy with the mussels they ordered and so they did not serve them (something else to like about Rosded).

    Tom (who will almost certainly be the person serving you) does have a copy of the translated menu at the top of this thread (along with some notes and highlights of favorites) so if you print out a copy and bring it, he can walk through it with you. I don't believe it differs much (if at all) from the current Rosded menu, but it can't hurt to bring it with you. In any event, I believe you will find Rosded a relaxing and cozy spot for a delicious meal with great service too. Sharing it with great dining companions as I did Tuesday night made it even better.
  • Post #22 - November 18th, 2011, 11:24 pm
    Post #22 - November 18th, 2011, 11:24 pm Post #22 - November 18th, 2011, 11:24 pm
    Great to see this beautiful account. Rosded was literally the first Thai restaurant I ever visited. Early 80s, maybe even earlier. Lincoln Sq. was a very different place, and Thai food was an exotic, brand new world.
    I hadn't been there for many years until a couple of years ago when we ended up in a temp. rental just 2 blocks down Western Ave. It was a great pleasure to find it still there and doing such consistent good food. Despite living virtually across the street from Spoon, we still found our way to Rosded regularly.
    Thanks for the great photos and detailed descriptions.
    I hate to diss the several run-of-the-mill Thai places in Hyde Park, because they're are all very friendly and eager to please. And they do OK, if you learn what to order and what to stay away from.
    But they're not doing stuff like this.
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #23 - July 24th, 2012, 8:12 pm
    Post #23 - July 24th, 2012, 8:12 pm Post #23 - July 24th, 2012, 8:12 pm
    Earlier this month, Leela Punyaratabandhu of SheSimmers wrote on Serious Eats of Ten Overlooked Thai Dishes in the Chicago Area. Two of the ten dishes mentioned are from Rosded and I had not tried either one before. One, kuai tiao khua kai is a rather simple noodles dish consisting of wide rice noodles with some chicken, eggs, green onions (and apparently squid sometimes) served on lettuce. Leela noted that the beauty of this dish depends upon well-charred rice noodles (hence "khua" I assume, which means roasted). It is listed on Erik M's original Rosded translation above (spelled a little differently though) and I have seen it offered at other Thai restaurants (I believe TAC Quick has it), but I had never tried it before, even in Bangkok where it's apparently quite popular, until the other night when I had it at Rosded.

    I was initially underwhelmed by the dish, as there was not sufficient char in my opinion, and really not a hell of a lot of flavor (a lack of seasoning really). Once home, I threw it in a hot wok for a short bit and also found that just a little fish sauce and a little soy (not much at all) brought out just enough flavor (and an underlying garlic flavor) to make this a really delicious and comforting dish. I'd like to give it another try sometime and insist upon the proper charring (maybe just an imperfect prep that night) because I can see the appeal here - simplicity.

    However, it was the other dish that Leela recommended - kuai tiao kang - that really blew me away immediately. This dish I suppose is the Muslim Thais' answer to the Northern Thais and their khao soi. It consisted of fatty yet tender pieces of beef, a panang curry, thin rice stick noodles, fried shallot and bean sprouts (Leela shows it on Serious Eats with peanuts added too, which would have been a great addition). Also, I think it's the same dish Leela has provided a recipe for in her blog - http://www.shesimmers.com/2012/04/slow- ... odles.html. Anyway, I thought Rosded's version was outstanding. What it lacked texturally compared to Khao Soi (just because there are no crispy fried noodles in this dish), it made up for with a terrific panang curry, flavorful beef and egg. This was one of the very best curries I have tasted and I can't recommend it highly enough. Run, don't walk, to Rosded and try it now! But as I mention above, the beef is fatty - I say deal with it.

    I don't believe this latter dish is on either the current Rosded menu or translated version above (though I've asked Leela if she can provide a more current translation so keep your fingers crossed), but bring in a print-out of the Serious Eats page or try to request it as the beef panang (or red) curry noodles with egg, which I believe they'll understand.
  • Post #24 - September 22nd, 2012, 10:55 am
    Post #24 - September 22nd, 2012, 10:55 am Post #24 - September 22nd, 2012, 10:55 am
    Why so quiet here? I know, there are other great Thai places - Sticky Rice has worked its way back into my rotation (certainly for the khao soi and banana blossom salad), Spoon is still solidly in the mix too (naem khao tawt, catfish curry custard - hor mok pla), Aroy is guaranteed (sausages, larb, tom yum w/ beef balls) . . . I have not yet been to ATK . . .

    but then there is Rosded and there's no reason this thread should be so quiet because the food continues to be terrific and they have a number of dishes not necessarily found elsewhere and that are really terrific. If you love Thai food and you are not visiting Rosded, you are only punishing yourself.

    One dish that is a must is the kuai tiao kang, the beef curry noodles that I mention in my previous post (and pictured in the Serious Eats link in my post). I have not had this dish before Rosded, and it is just outstanding. I don't believe it's on their menu (I'm pleading with them to create a new menu with translated Thai menu items), but if you order beef curry noodles with egg you'll get what you want (or bring your cell phone and click on the SE link in my prior post and show it to them).

    Paired with the spicy omelet filled with ground pork shoulder and Thai basil, this was pretty close to a perfect meal - I love mixing savory and spicy (sure, a little sour funk would have made it even better). The omelet is on the translated menu in Erik M.'s first post in this thread, and I also have a somewhat crappy picture above. One of the things I loved about Bangkok is how they found ways to fill omelets with anything and everything.

    So come on, I know I'm not the only person here frequenting Rosded.
  • Post #25 - September 22nd, 2012, 4:10 pm
    Post #25 - September 22nd, 2012, 4:10 pm Post #25 - September 22nd, 2012, 4:10 pm
    Any idea if those items are at Rosded Too in Morton Grove, or if the suburban spot is on par with the city version?
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #26 - September 22nd, 2012, 5:31 pm
    Post #26 - September 22nd, 2012, 5:31 pm Post #26 - September 22nd, 2012, 5:31 pm
    JoelF wrote:Any idea if those items are at Rosded Too in Morton Grove, or if the suburban spot is on par with the city version?

    Sorry but I don't know
  • Post #27 - September 23rd, 2012, 9:46 am
    Post #27 - September 23rd, 2012, 9:46 am Post #27 - September 23rd, 2012, 9:46 am
    Combining lunch at Rosded with a visit to the Thai store, one door West, or any of the interesting, and within walking distance, food shops such as Bouffe, The Cheese Stands Alone, Joe The Sausage King or Meyer's Deli make for a nice couple of hours.


    Man, a lot has changed around that area since 2006......
  • Post #28 - September 23rd, 2012, 10:44 am
    Post #28 - September 23rd, 2012, 10:44 am Post #28 - September 23rd, 2012, 10:44 am
    JoelF wrote:Any idea if those items are at Rosded Too in Morton Grove, or if the suburban spot is on par with the city version?


    Based on only one visit, I'd say it wasn't even close. They might as well be two different restaurants. The MG location seemed very Americanized compared to the Lincoln Square flagship.

    Rosded Too
    9510 Waukegan Rd
    Morton Grove, IL 60053
    (847) 965-5561
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #29 - August 20th, 2013, 10:44 am
    Post #29 - August 20th, 2013, 10:44 am Post #29 - August 20th, 2013, 10:44 am
    Might be going tonight, our first ever visit. Should be five of us.
  • Post #30 - August 24th, 2013, 2:45 pm
    Post #30 - August 24th, 2013, 2:45 pm Post #30 - August 24th, 2013, 2:45 pm
    I got takeout from Rosded recently when my wife and I took her cousin and his wife, who were in from the Bay Area, to the Half Acre Tap Room and it was just as delicious and inexpensive as always. $33 for a meal easily big enough for the four of us. The cousin and wife gave the food high marks, which is meaningful since they lived in Thailand for about a year. The combo of Pad Gra Pao with pork and Massaman Curry with chicken was amazing as the sweetness of the curry went so well with the spicy saltiness of the basil pork.

    Probably going to either go there tonight or get takeout while at Half Acre again. Still can't believe this place gets less love than somewhere like Spoon.

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