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Ilidzanka Bosnian for Cevapcici [Pictures}

Ilidzanka Bosnian for Cevapcici [Pictures}
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  • Post #31 - October 23rd, 2005, 4:08 pm
    Post #31 - October 23rd, 2005, 4:08 pm Post #31 - October 23rd, 2005, 4:08 pm
    LAZ wrote:
    Vital Information wrote:You know the cevapcici I have liked are few and far between.

    Thank goodness. I thought it was just me. Most of those I've had were pretty bland -- like savorless skinny hamburgers. That's why I enjoyed those I had at Old Town Serbian so much -- they actually had flavor.


    Well, that's about right. Cevapcici aren't the most spiced sausages in the world. That's why I generally prefer the Bosnian type, as they contain lamb, which is much more flavorful than the typical beef/pork combo you get in Zagreb or Belgrade.

    Besides that, there's not much to it. A little bit of pepper, some garlic, salt, and a bit of hot paprika, and that's it. My "secret" is to use Vegeta, a salty vegetable-stock powder/all-purpose Croatian seasoning, instead of plain salt. But other than that, they're not supposed to be exactly exploding in flavor.

    The key to a good chevap, in my opinion is to use ground lamb in your meat mixture and grill it, not fry it. That said, it's one of my favorite sausages--possibly for reasons of nostalgia and comfort--especially when served with raw onions and ajvar.
  • Post #32 - October 23rd, 2005, 6:15 pm
    Post #32 - October 23rd, 2005, 6:15 pm Post #32 - October 23rd, 2005, 6:15 pm
    LTH,

    I've enjoyed most every cevapcici I've ever eaten, but not-so-much sweeping political generalizations, in either direction, extrapolated from one person's interaction with one person who, may very well, have simply had a toothache or such.

    LTHForum is a food centric forum, not laser focus, but still we are starting to drift pretty far from LTHForum's flashlight focus when Hitler and Stalin start to turn up in cameos.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #33 - October 23rd, 2005, 9:35 pm
    Post #33 - October 23rd, 2005, 9:35 pm Post #33 - October 23rd, 2005, 9:35 pm
    G Wiv wrote:

    Looks like I owe you the standard LTHForum bad lead $3.95.


    Gary, please keep your $3.95 but earmark it for a bottle of Cholula or Melinda’s if she’s more your type :wink: . I've followed plenty enough of your leads to gold that I owe you.

    Ignoring politics and the subjective nature of my experience, I wish to (re)iterate two items in my post that have not been commented on.

    When leaving with food “to go” check the packaging before traveling. Lots of cooked food needs to breathe. Don’t go home with a mushy mess. Even when you think you’re safe, you may not be. I remember a great VI post regarding soup at Halina’s. Soon after, I stopped in and ordered servings of all three soups offered to go. I’ll spare you all the details but I got home with a bag of mixed soup. It may have been great, but I will never know.

    The entire time I was at Ilidzanka’s two containers of insecticide sat on the kitchen pass through counter – the aperture through which all prepared food was conveyed to the dining room. Forget specific health code violations, this shows a complete disregard for safe food handling practices. Dine at your own risk.

    -ramon
  • Post #34 - October 24th, 2005, 12:09 am
    Post #34 - October 24th, 2005, 12:09 am Post #34 - October 24th, 2005, 12:09 am
    I really like cevapcici/kefta in its many forms.

    A few nice renditions include the hamburger-patty shaped kefta at Petra Cafe in the Loop. Despite the Jordanian reference, the owner is Palestinian. He makes a hell of a hot sauce that he will share if you show interest, and the pita is from South Side Bakery. What's not to like?

    There is also a new Turkish cafe on the corner of Addison and Lincoln that has a few decent options, including kefta that is, basically, just like "Yugoslavian" cevaps. Lentil soup is ok too.

    My favorite is still the summer fest booth, where the guys (Croatian, I think) grill over charcoal. They have the nice sign with the cartoon character animals and the arithmetic formula, cow+lamb+pig=cevapcici. They were fantastic at Retro on Roscoe.
  • Post #35 - October 24th, 2005, 6:12 am
    Post #35 - October 24th, 2005, 6:12 am Post #35 - October 24th, 2005, 6:12 am
    Addison and Lincoln-- is that Red Corner? Last time I went, a couple of years ago, it was Israeli, but it could be Turkish now, I guess.

    UPDATE: Made a point of going by that way this morning and sure enough, it is now Demir Fast Food, presumably yet another outpost of Demir, the first cook at A La Turka, then owner of Cafe Demir, now owner of Cousins.
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  • Post #36 - October 24th, 2005, 8:22 am
    Post #36 - October 24th, 2005, 8:22 am Post #36 - October 24th, 2005, 8:22 am
    Are you sure? :wink:
  • Post #37 - October 26th, 2005, 8:45 am
    Post #37 - October 26th, 2005, 8:45 am Post #37 - October 26th, 2005, 8:45 am
    zim wrote:Ares Cafe, Just south of Hellas Bakery, Greek Place. When I peeked in it was 5 guys smoking, one guy rolling a cigarette on the counter, and one dude playing greek music on the guitar. Btw, Hellas' spinach rolls are really pretty good.


    The owners of Hellas Bakery on Lawrence and Talman are my next-door neighbors, and they're good people! So support the bakery if you can -- I will second Zim's opinion, I think their spanakopita is wonderful and the pastries are all very good too.

    I cannot speak for Ares Cafe, however, as I've not been in there, nor any of the other places Zim mentioned (except for a mighty quick look-see into Balikbayan.)
  • Post #38 - October 30th, 2005, 12:00 pm
    Post #38 - October 30th, 2005, 12:00 pm Post #38 - October 30th, 2005, 12:00 pm
    G Wiv, Ramon:

    I stopped by Azur Meats to get some cevapcici yesterday and after making the purchase, while heading back to the car, I realised I didn't have any bread to go with them. It occurred to me I should go into Ilidzanka and see if I could get some there. The lady pictured above was there and she greeted me and my request to purchase lepina to take home in a most friendly way. She advised me that it had been baked the day before and offered to let me look it over. I said I was sure it would be fine (lepina does stay quite nice for a couple of days) and asked to buy two loaves. She said it would be two dollars and then added, "you buy two, I give three." And indeed, she gave me an extra loaf at no charge of very tasty and still nice and puffy lepina.

    So, Ramon, if you see that nice lady at work, I think it would be worth another try. I definitely want to go back for a sit down meal.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #39 - October 30th, 2005, 9:43 pm
    Post #39 - October 30th, 2005, 9:43 pm Post #39 - October 30th, 2005, 9:43 pm
    Antonius:

    I have printed said kind lady's picture, and I am carrying it fondly in my wallet in anticipation of a better day.

    -ramon
  • Post #40 - October 31st, 2005, 2:43 pm
    Post #40 - October 31st, 2005, 2:43 pm Post #40 - October 31st, 2005, 2:43 pm
    Beograd on Irving has been mentioned very briefly here a few times, so let me bring it up again. It's a Serbian place with a very nice little selection of smoked meats, including a spicy hunter's sausage, pork belly, pork loin and, on weekends, damn fine looking "lechon" or roasted pork shoulder. Cevapcici, of course: 80/20 beef/pork. Huge variety of Hungarian peppers, ajvar, etc. Also a major supplier of Balkan sodas to the community. Fresh (house made?) yogurt and feta. Baked goods, including very different-from-Levantine baklava and the round "pita" loaves with an internal texture like focaccia-meets-English muffin. Good espresso in the little cafe next door, too.

    Thank goodness for Marianao, Harlem Ave. and the Balkan places. We have great coffee, just not where you think.

    The counter lady/espresso lady was telling me about how she is saving up to buy a refurbished Gaggia for her home. That's all you need to know.

    2937 W. Irving Park Rd. Chicago
  • Post #41 - October 31st, 2005, 2:51 pm
    Post #41 - October 31st, 2005, 2:51 pm Post #41 - October 31st, 2005, 2:51 pm
    JeffB wrote:Beograd on Irving has been mentioned very briefly here a few times, so let me bring it up again...

    2937 W. Irving Park Rd. Chicago


    Thanks for bringing it up again. I pass this place fairly often, but it's almost always late at night on the way from a hockey game to Laschet's or Resi's for a post-game beer. I've got stop by there.

    Do they do there own baking too?

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #42 - October 31st, 2005, 2:57 pm
    Post #42 - October 31st, 2005, 2:57 pm Post #42 - October 31st, 2005, 2:57 pm
    Not sure about the bread. It seems they might, as the place is very large and the definitely make their own pastry. Open surprisingly late; they seem to leave the store open just in case while the cafe is open. I was there after 8 on Friday.
  • Post #43 - November 1st, 2005, 9:28 am
    Post #43 - November 1st, 2005, 9:28 am Post #43 - November 1st, 2005, 9:28 am
    Antonius,

    if you're looking from bread from the area, the montenegrin place on ridge just south of howard (it was called pitas etc, but I think they changes their name recently) anyway its a small storefront, east side of the street, which advetises montenegrin cuisine in the front, bakes their own stuff, I can vouch for the quality of their breads
  • Post #44 - November 1st, 2005, 10:01 am
    Post #44 - November 1st, 2005, 10:01 am Post #44 - November 1st, 2005, 10:01 am
    zim wrote:Antonius,

    if you're looking from bread from the area, the montenegrin place on ridge just south of howard (it was called pitas etc, but I think they changes their name recently) anyway its a small storefront, east side of the street, which advetises montenegrin cuisine in the front, bakes their own stuff, I can vouch for the quality of their breads


    Zim:

    Many thanks. I'll check it out.

    Have you tried anything they offer other than baked goods you'd recommend?

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #45 - November 2nd, 2005, 5:11 pm
    Post #45 - November 2nd, 2005, 5:11 pm Post #45 - November 2nd, 2005, 5:11 pm
    Only thing i've had there other than bread isa burek, It wasn't bad but I wasn't crazy about it, but that's pretty much my opinion of every burek I've had.

    I probably should mention that bread is somewhat of limited availability, she makes a few loafs a day I think, of two varieties a round one and a squarish mor traditional bread loaf, but last time I was there she said something about not having the pans for the long one.

    I found the new name etc.
    Deta's Cafe
    7555 N. Ridge
    (773) 973-1505
  • Post #46 - November 3rd, 2005, 10:10 am
    Post #46 - November 3rd, 2005, 10:10 am Post #46 - November 3rd, 2005, 10:10 am
    I was wandering one of my local groceries yesterday (Produce World, SEC Lawrence & Cumberland, Norridge) and saw cevapcici in the prewrapped meat cooler. It was priced at $3.99 a pound in approx 3 lb packages. The ingredients listed pork before beef. The product was produced in Shely, MI.

    It's suddenly everywhere!

    -ramon
  • Post #47 - November 4th, 2005, 5:58 pm
    Post #47 - November 4th, 2005, 5:58 pm Post #47 - November 4th, 2005, 5:58 pm
    JeffB wrote:Beograd on Irving has been mentioned very briefly here a few times, so let me bring it up again. It's a Serbian place with a very nice little selection of smoked meats . . . Fresh (house made?) yogurt and feta. Baked goods, including very different-from-Levantine baklava and the round "pita" loaves with an internal texture like focaccia-meets-English muffin.

    I’ve been quite happy with the meats and sausage from Beograd. They don’t prepare these in house but have them made to their recipes. I’m certain they make their own yogurt as I watched them prepare it in the back room. It seems fairly low-fat and has a nice sweet flavor. I was told they bake their own bread. I much prefer the round loaves over the pan bread. The pastries are generally pretty good. I like their version of baklava, with its almost paste-like filling. Their krempita was not to my taste. Here are a couple photos I took earlier this year.

    Smoked Pork and Bread from Beograd
    Image

    Beograd’s Baklava
    Image
  • Post #48 - November 4th, 2005, 9:53 pm
    Post #48 - November 4th, 2005, 9:53 pm Post #48 - November 4th, 2005, 9:53 pm
    I was at Deta's a few weeks ago for burek. (The cheese burek reminds me of similar savory pastries I had years ago in Bucuresti, and I have to say, they hold a special place in my heart. Probably literally.) This is a dish that travels cross-culturally. Deta, the owner, told me that while many of her customers are Montenegrans who order ahead for the weekend, she also does a thriving business among the Carribean residents of Howard Street, who particularly like the meat burek. I think of the cheese burek as a great pizza alternative, and my friend's kids confirmed this by inhaling it. Deta makes daily specials: a chicken soup and a lamb and cabbage stew on the day I visited. She emphasized that everything she offers is "100% home-made" and that she trusts no one but herself and her daughter in the kitchen. You gotta respect that. . .
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #49 - November 12th, 2005, 10:47 am
    Post #49 - November 12th, 2005, 10:47 am Post #49 - November 12th, 2005, 10:47 am
    Image

    Tried Demir Fast Food, the new incarnation of the place at Ashland and Lincoln and Addison mentioned a few posts above. (I actually wrote about the previous business in that spot here.)

    Menu is mostly American hot dog stand stuff, with a few very basic Turkish items, nowhere near the variety of mildly unusual stuff that you found at Demir's old Cafe Demir. (Nor the variety that it had as Red Corner.)

    The kebabs I had were quite decent, but I have a hard time seeing this place as a viable business-- not enough Turkish stuff to attract folks like me very often, not enough blue collar lunch crowd right around here any more to eat burgers and dogs (and both of the tables that were occupied when I was there were eating Turkish).
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  • Post #50 - November 12th, 2005, 10:52 pm
    Post #50 - November 12th, 2005, 10:52 pm Post #50 - November 12th, 2005, 10:52 pm
    Hi,

    When Culinary Historians had a dinner at Demir's latest restaurant Cousin's, there were several fans of his Cafe Demir present. Demir indicated he was altering the menu over the next month to include many favorites from Cafe Demir. While I was never at Cafe Demir, he indicated some items on our menu were from this place which he was test driving on us:

    Appetizers and Salad:
    Çoban Salata (Shepherd’s Salad)
    Pepper Dolma
    Sauteed Hamse (Black Sea sardines)
    Hamse with Vegetables
    Muchlama (Black Sea Mountain polenta)
    Karadeniz Pide (Black Sea Stuffed Bread)

    Entrees:
    Kuzu Kebab (Lamb Kebab
    Tavuk (Chicken Kebab)
    Adana Kebab (Beef and Lamb Kebab)

    Desserts:
    Homemade Baklava
    PirinçTatlisi (Rice Pudding in Syrup)

    Plus:
    Special Homemade Turkish breads including Simit
    1 glass wine
    1 glass Raki (liquor)

    If you ever give it a shot, I would be interested how it really compares to the old lamented Cafe Demir.

    Cousins Restaurant
    2833 N. Broadway Avenue
    Chicago

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #51 - November 13th, 2005, 8:46 am
    Post #51 - November 13th, 2005, 8:46 am Post #51 - November 13th, 2005, 8:46 am
    Cafe Demir wasn't THAT lamented by me, but it did have a substantially broader menu than Demir Fast Food, with things like that white bean, tomato, parsley salad whose name escapes me at the moment. I suppose I ought to try Cousins now, but I found it quite mediocre in its previous incarnation and thought basically every other Turkish place in town was better, so I haven't exactly had the urge to eat at it again, even to see if it was improved.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #52 - November 23rd, 2005, 3:09 pm
    Post #52 - November 23rd, 2005, 3:09 pm Post #52 - November 23rd, 2005, 3:09 pm
    Great chevapi can be found at Memories Inn Tavern on Western Ave. and also at Bel Ami on North Lincoln. Both are very different, but memorable.
  • Post #53 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:05 pm
    Post #53 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:05 pm Post #53 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:05 pm
    MST wrote:Great chevapi can be found at Memories Inn Tavern on Western Ave. and also at Bel Ami on North Lincoln. Both are very different, but memorable.


    MST:

    Do you have addresses or cross streets for them?

    TIA

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #54 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:12 pm
    Post #54 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:12 pm Post #54 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:12 pm
    Hey there:
    You can check out my website for reviews of them both for my food column for centerstage.net. It's called The Raving Dish and the archives are at www.bigsweettooth.com
    and in the meantime, they are at:

    Bel Ami
    5530 N. Lincoln Ave.

    Memories Inn Tavern
    5726 N. Western Ave.

    Also, up by Bel Ami is a new Bulgarian bakery with delicious cheese bread. It's simply called The Bulgarian Bakery.

    Bel Ami also has jaw-dropping mochas and lattes. Great place to chill for the afternoon. Try the Romanian soup if it is available that day, too.
    Enjoy!
  • Post #55 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:59 pm
    Post #55 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:59 pm Post #55 - November 23rd, 2005, 4:59 pm
    MST wrote:
    Try the Romanian soup if it is available that day, too.


    Just wondering what kind of treatment makes a soup "Romanian"?

    Thanks.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #56 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:07 pm
    Post #56 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:07 pm Post #56 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:07 pm
    Not too sure, but I do know it's a piping hot bowl of soup loaded with big, fat meatballs, chunky potatoes and carrots and a wonderful, almost slurpable broth. They serve a huge basket of awesome homemade bread with it. And, it's only about $3 per bowl.
    Last edited by MST on November 23rd, 2005, 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #57 - November 23rd, 2005, 8:57 pm
    Post #57 - November 23rd, 2005, 8:57 pm Post #57 - November 23rd, 2005, 8:57 pm
    Sounds to me like ciorba de perisoare--meatball soup, a classic Romanian dish. Glad to hear of another source! Thanks.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #58 - March 29th, 2006, 8:42 am
    Post #58 - March 29th, 2006, 8:42 am Post #58 - March 29th, 2006, 8:42 am
    Just wanted to assuage anyone's concerns about eating at Ilidzanka. Ate dinner there last night, and while I can't say I'll be eating Bosnian food every day of the week, it was a good, solid meal for anyone who considers "sausage" and "bread" two of the major food groups. The guy cooking it up for us was so gracious and sweet, I wanted to bear hug him.

    We called to make sure the restaurant would be open, and he said he closed at 8, but he'd stick around for us. Sure enough, we show up around 7, and he's there...all by himself...waiting for us.

    We ordered the cevapci, the mixed meat, a spinach burek and meat burek and the yogurt drink.

    While waiting for the food, it occurred to us that beer might be in order, but it wasn't clear if the restaurant served it or allowed it brought in, so I peeked into the kitchen to ask. He got a little sheepish, fumbled around in the refrigerator, pulled out two beers and said, "I have two Heineken if you want." Awwwww. Now THAT'S service...offering up a couple of cold ones from your private stock.

    As expected, the cevapci was excellent. The bread was soft and warm enough to roll up and sleep in. I probably wouldn't order the mixed meat again. The veal kabob and chicken were a bit tough. The bureks are not to be missed.

    I don't know what the scene is during lunch or the afternoon, but we couldn't have asked for better treatment.
  • Post #59 - August 21st, 2006, 2:15 pm
    Post #59 - August 21st, 2006, 2:15 pm Post #59 - August 21st, 2006, 2:15 pm
    Between the Air and Water Show on Saturday and dinner with my dad I promised the wife that we would make a pilgrimage north to get some tamales at Tamales los Mejores de Guerrero (she loves tamales!) and after fulfilling that quest and on the way home I could not resist a stop at Ilidzanka's for their cevapcici.

    Almost drove past the place and was lucky to get a space right in front in the small lot.

    Upon entering and running a gauntlet of locals enjoying coffee and a cigarette I made my way to the back counter and placed my order to go (with everything on it).

    I was told it would be about 10 minutes to prepare so I took advantage of that time to visit some of the other stores nearby... There was an impressive variety of lamb available at Azur Meats.

    Upon returning and relaxing for a while my sandwich was done and we were off.

    Later that night at dinner we all enjoyed the sandwich. This thing was huge! The sausage had a flavor we had not tasted before, mild, (the wife thinking it would be good with breakfast). The pita (?) was light and flaky and the sour cream sauce smooth with onion bits mixed in.

    Never had Bosnian food before and my family and I thank you. :)
  • Post #60 - October 26th, 2006, 2:41 pm
    Post #60 - October 26th, 2006, 2:41 pm Post #60 - October 26th, 2006, 2:41 pm
    I visited Ilidzanka yesterday for lunch, having read this thread in the distant past and being prepared for a cool reception. While I got the impression that the appearance of a non-regular at the door was a cause for some curiosity and perhaps even concern, those present were quick to warm up and to engage me in a rather long conversation about their impressions of life in the U.S. and cevapcici. I was offered a gift of coffee as soon as I made clear my interest in their cuisine.

    At this point, they seem to have figured out that strange faces at their door are Gary's crowd, and once they pegged me they were perfectly charming. I'm sorry that Mike, Ramon, and others have had less than a warm welcome. It helps to be a woman in these circumstances, perhaps? We do not tend to present the same type of challenge, I think, whereas concerns men have around other strange men may be more unsettling. In any case, with what many refugees have been through, it is understandable that a residue of wariness remains.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.

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