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La Quebrada - New (ish) Menu

La Quebrada - New (ish) Menu
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  • La Quebrada - New (ish) Menu

    Post #1 - October 10th, 2005, 8:17 am
    Post #1 - October 10th, 2005, 8:17 am Post #1 - October 10th, 2005, 8:17 am
    La Quebrada changes its menu nearly as often as Alinea. Perhaps like ChefG, the maestros at Quebrada stay up late seeing how they can stretch the envelope of salted dried beef (a/k/a cecina). Actually, the new menu seems all about trying to get the Quebrada customer to eat more.

    There are several combinations ranging from $8.99 to $35 mostly combing grilled meats, but there is also a combination Teloloapan, which is like a restaurant version of the famed Maroon vans, fried tacos and enchilladas in Guerenese sweet dark brown Teloloapan mole. I'd like to comment on these items more, but I have never tried them.

    La Quebrada makes some exceptional sauces, the curry scented salsa India (no joke), the house warm molcajete, with roasted tomatoes and chiles (I believe guaijillo) and the extra spicy, one dimensional, but one brutally great dimension arbol. Still, I've mostly settled in, of late with the antojitos (tacos, sopes, gorditas, picaditas).

    All the antojitos at Quebrada start with a mass of nixtamal or corn masa dough (but NOT instant!). One woman in the kitchen forms to order the masa into different shapes depending on what you want. Gorditas have a thick base and the thinnest of tops for their stuffings, I especially like to have them with the steamed goat (barbacoa de chivo). If you are feeling vegetarian, get the picaditas, think a gordita without its top. While a lot of places make gorditas and such from scratch, few places also serve their tacos on fresh made tortillas.

    I have not found a better tortilla in Chicago than the ones La Quebrada makes, large and thick. Stack about five and eat them with maple syrup for breakfast. The taco de cecina is, with the tacos de barbacoa at La Ley, my favorite taco outside of Maxwell Street. The ingredients do not look like much, typical friojoles refrito, bits of drab cecina (a truly ugly product), a sprinkling of pico de gallo and a dab of guacamole. Because all of the materials, from the tortilla upward, are so well done, the taco is so well done.

    That's what sums up La Quebrada. From the outside it looks like nothing special, certainly one of any of thousands of Mexican places around Chicago. Inside, they make the effort to make things better. Guacamole, salsas, pico de gallo are not difficult things to make, even tortillas are not THAT difficult, assuming ideal nixtamal, yet Quebrada coaxes the most out of these things.

    Over time, La Quebrada has spread. You have no excuse from finding your own location. Check the new menu because it may change soon.

    4859 W. Roosevelt - Cicero
    3818 W. 63rd - Chicago
    5100 S. California - Chicago
    2906 W. Cermak - Chicago
    723 S. Broadway - Aurora
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #2 - October 10th, 2005, 8:43 am
    Post #2 - October 10th, 2005, 8:43 am Post #2 - October 10th, 2005, 8:43 am
    Amata, Lucantonius and I have been to the one on 63rd Street once and we enjoyed it very much. I can't remember what Amata had but I believe I had the cecina and it was delicious. And the salsas are, as you say, really quite good. I do also remember being very happy with the tortillas but will refrain from any sweeping generalisations with regard to how they stack up (pun intended) alongside others in town until I have a few more tries at La Quebrada. But again, the tortillas I had on that one occasion were memorable.*

    And I remember too that the service was really pleasant. Our servers didn't really speak any English but we were able to speak to them in Spanish; we plied them with questions about Guerrero and Guerrerense food and the waiter asked us for tips on expressions in English used in waiting tables. We had a great time all around.

    We've been intending to go back to the one on 63rd and we'd happily visit other branches, but there are just so many good Mexican places to visit, and so few holes left for expanding the belt...

    Antonius

    * The handmade tortillas at Casa de Samuel are consistently excellent in my experience. I just had the opportunity to have them again last week and was, as always, absolutely delighted with them. But that's for another thread.
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #3 - October 10th, 2005, 8:52 am
    Post #3 - October 10th, 2005, 8:52 am Post #3 - October 10th, 2005, 8:52 am
    Antonius wrote: I do also remember being very happy with the tortillas but will refrain from any sweeping generalisations


    I thought sweeping generalizations was the raison d'etre of Internet Food Forums :D :twisted: :wink:
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #4 - October 10th, 2005, 9:28 am
    Post #4 - October 10th, 2005, 9:28 am Post #4 - October 10th, 2005, 9:28 am
    Vital Information wrote:
    Antonius wrote: I do also remember being very happy with the tortillas but will refrain from any sweeping generalisations


    I thought sweeping generalizations was the raison d'etre of Internet Food Forums :D :twisted: :wink:


    Of course, and that's why I resist... :D :twisted: :wink:

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #5 - October 10th, 2005, 9:35 am
    Post #5 - October 10th, 2005, 9:35 am Post #5 - October 10th, 2005, 9:35 am
    Antonius wrote:
    Vital Information wrote:
    Antonius wrote: I do also remember being very happy with the tortillas but will refrain from any sweeping generalisations


    I thought sweeping generalizations was the raison d'etre of Internet Food Forums :D :twisted: :wink:


    Of course, and that's why I resist... :D :twisted: :wink:

    A


    Maybe we should make a list? :twisted:
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #6 - October 10th, 2005, 12:52 pm
    Post #6 - October 10th, 2005, 12:52 pm Post #6 - October 10th, 2005, 12:52 pm
    Isn't there a LQ in Glen Ellyn, on Roosevelt, near (I think) Park...?
  • Post #7 - October 10th, 2005, 12:54 pm
    Post #7 - October 10th, 2005, 12:54 pm Post #7 - October 10th, 2005, 12:54 pm
    gordon_k wrote:Isn't there a LQ in Glen Ellyn, on Roosevelt, near (I think) Park...?


    I took the addresses off the menu I picked up the other day.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #8 - October 10th, 2005, 2:12 pm
    Post #8 - October 10th, 2005, 2:12 pm Post #8 - October 10th, 2005, 2:12 pm
    Glen Ellyn outpost is in the same plaza as a Binnys and Trader Joes. Ate there once and was decent. Definitely fresh in house made tortillas as well.

    La Quebrada
    690 Roosevelt Rd, Glen Ellyn, IL
    Phone: (630) 790-0427
  • Post #9 - October 11th, 2005, 4:00 am
    Post #9 - October 11th, 2005, 4:00 am Post #9 - October 11th, 2005, 4:00 am
    electric mullet wrote:Glen Ellyn outpost is in the same plaza as a Binnys and Trader Joes. Ate there once and was decent. Definitely fresh in house made tortillas as well.

    La Quebrada
    690 Roosevelt Rd, Glen Ellyn, IL
    Phone: (630) 790-0427


    It is not guaranteed that this is the same chain as LQ is a very famous landmark, tho when I first started going to the one on Roosevelt based on VI's excellent advice a few years a go, only the 63rd street location was listed on the menu, and I stumbled upon the Aurora location by accident (or perhaps because you alerted me to it, "Mr Mullet?"). Only after a visit and further triangulation (reading the Aurora menu which was mostly identical and referenced the Cicero and 63rd street locations) did I determine it was all one big LQ.

    Roosevelt/Cicero location is an old diner that clearly did breakfast for the Spiegel's warehouse before becoming LQ. Aurora, on the other hand, is an old roadhouse by the Fox River that seems to do a pretty big bar business, has music on weekend evenings, and generally has a much higher buzz (can't comment on the hipness quotient since I am long past qualified to do that). Food seems slightly better in Cicero to my palate, but that may be because I was better able to focus on it - Aurora also had some smell issues on one visit, apparently due to some overly energetic bathroom disinfection.

    At times, the places seem to offer different menus, as the process of change rolls through the mini-chain. Darned good food.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #10 - October 16th, 2005, 12:34 pm
    Post #10 - October 16th, 2005, 12:34 pm Post #10 - October 16th, 2005, 12:34 pm
    The LQ in Glen Ellyn is affiliated with the Chicago group. It won't be for much longer; we're still trying to come up with a new name (we being the people who frequent the joint and the owner's family). I think the LQ chain owners (head honchos, if you will) were not impressed by year one numbers and decided it was not "worth" their name.

    The menu is a scaled down version of the Cicero location. Cecina is available upon request and they'll make pretty much anything you want. Tortillas made to order. Food is outstanding....had huevos con chorizo y hongos this morning.....yummy!

    Chilaquiles are fab.....especially with seasoned pork!
  • Post #11 - October 16th, 2005, 3:03 pm
    Post #11 - October 16th, 2005, 3:03 pm Post #11 - October 16th, 2005, 3:03 pm
    I was in West Pilsen this morning to buy some fabric for upholstering a chair at one of the city's better warehouse/retailers and took advantage of the opportunity to stop at a nearby branch of La Quebrada, the one at 2906 W. Cermak Road in Chicago.

    A friend and I arrived at about 11:30 a.m. The small storefront located in a two store strip center has tables seating no more than 50 people, and parking for 4 or 5 cars in the small lot in front. Decor is basic, but not uncomfortable. 1/2 the seats were filled when we arrived, only four remained available when we finished an hour later. When full, It's not crowded, in the sense that people are sitting upon one another. There's a small juke box mounted on the wall, and it broadcast some music the entire visit.

    The menu is nicely varied, seafood, chicken, beef, goat, eggs - something for everyone. I chose the Carne a la Tampequeña platter. My friend is not the adventurous type and is a bit afraid of "ethic" food, so he chose eggs and bacon.

    The typically complimentary totopos (often referred to as "nachos" by some non-Mexicans) and salsa arrived at the table quickly. The totopos were standard fare, nothing special - either a bulk purchase or made in-house from tortillas different than what are served with the meals. They reminded me of commercial-grade corn tortillas used as the base product. The salsa was a surprise - as it was served steaming hot. I can't recall having salsa served that way before, and it was nicely done. I don't know the variety of salsa, other than it was not verde, not pico del gallo and it was not too pica.

    Sunday is probably the busiest time of the week in the restaurant and there was just one waitress on duty, but she had the help of someone fixing the liquados, juices and clearing away the plates. Although the service was understandably a bit slow (given the crowd and my guess is that the kitchen's not all that big), the waitress was efficient, accommodating and it was not a distraction. I speak Spanish and had no difficulty communicating, but my friend doesn't and he did . . . and the waitress struggled with her knowledge of English.

    My Carne a la Tampequena was okay. Not excellent, not spectacular . . . just okay. This cut of meat can be tough at times, and mine was today. I think it was cut too thick, and the resulting effect was that it was chewy - like shoe leather. I also didn't think it was seasoned very well, before I applied the juice of a lime and the nice salsa. The platter includes rice, which included pieces of carrot (very dry, but okay); guacamole (okay, nothing special); refried beans (standard fare, just okay); and a cheese-filled enchilada with what appeared to be a mole reminiscent of poblano on top. The enchilada arrived cold, and I sent it back for re-heating. I ordered tortillas de maiz with the meal. The tortillas were standard fare for individually-made ones - noting at all special or significantly different that ones I've had countless times before (in Mexico). They were, however, a nice touch to the meal and, given the clientele of the restaurant, understandably an expected accompaniment.

    My friend enjoyed his eggs, thought the bacon was some of the best he'd eaten in a restaurant in some time, and he ate his refried beans and rice with carrots without comment. Well, almost without comment. He asked me if the rice was really rice. He'd not seen it fixed that way before. He drank te de Manzanilla with his meal, and the waitress' helper twice poured coffee into his cup of tea. Each time she did that I asked the waitress for a replacement for the tea, and, very embarrassed, she did so graciously. I downed a couple of Diet Coke's.

    For dessert we each had flan. It was fresh, a large portion and nicely complimented by some tiny dollops of whipped cream.

    The check for two came to just under $28.00, before adding the tip.

    The restaurant is obviously popular with people who've come to this country from the state of Guerrero. Their origin was written across most of their faces.

    Sweeping generalizations and rigid opinions don't evolve from just one visit. So, my first-timer review/opinion (subject to modification after any future visit) is:

    This La Quebrada location is a nice neighborhood restaurant serving "authentic" food typically found in the state of Guerrero, Mexico (as I compared it to the many places I've eaten in Guerrero). I didn't consider it special or extraordinary or worthy of consideration for a "best of" anything list. It's not a place I would go out of my way to visit (I live in W. Rodgers Park).

    Thanks for drawing my attention to the restaurant.
  • Post #12 - August 21st, 2006, 1:37 pm
    Post #12 - August 21st, 2006, 1:37 pm Post #12 - August 21st, 2006, 1:37 pm
    I had a chance to stop by the location in Cicero for a quick taco while dashing around the city last week and was pleasantly surprised.

    The steak was tender (a touch too salty) with a hint of garlic, the cilantro nice and fresh and the onions mild.

    After arriving home much later in the night I was pleasantly surprised to find a handful of chips snuggled down in the bottom of the bag under the napkins. This gave me a chance to give a 'full on' try to the salsa which was very good.

    I am sure a return visit will be in order especially since it is close to home.

    Thanks for the tip!
  • Post #13 - August 21st, 2006, 5:17 pm
    Post #13 - August 21st, 2006, 5:17 pm Post #13 - August 21st, 2006, 5:17 pm
    *sigh*

    I knew this was gonna happen.....Glen Ellyn La Quebrada is no more; closed on May 31 when the contract expired. Didn't want to post it but when I saw this pop up, I knew I had to say it. Closest one is Aurora.
  • Post #14 - November 27th, 2006, 9:06 am
    Post #14 - November 27th, 2006, 9:06 am Post #14 - November 27th, 2006, 9:06 am
    I was zipping down New York Street last week, and noticed that a La Quebrada "Express" has opened in what used to be (I think) another taco restaurant. I think it's around Union Street, or maybe a little closer to downtown. Sorry I don't know anything else about it
  • Post #15 - November 27th, 2006, 10:36 am
    Post #15 - November 27th, 2006, 10:36 am Post #15 - November 27th, 2006, 10:36 am
    I found out on Friday (11/24) via a waiter who's spouse works at La Quebrada in Aurora that La Quebrada Express is affiliated with the small chain. They serve mostly quick food (tacos, tortas, etc) with a few entrees. I've not been to the Express location but thought I'd pass on the information.
  • Post #16 - May 9th, 2007, 10:35 am
    Post #16 - May 9th, 2007, 10:35 am Post #16 - May 9th, 2007, 10:35 am
    Happened to be with a group while out in Aurora on Sunday and they trust me to choose where we will eat lunch.

    La Quebrada was the choice.

    The place was busy (not out the door though) and there was not a Gringo in sight (except for us).

    My bride and I both had the Chicken enchiladas with mole and they were awesome! Chock full of chicken with a nicely complex mole. A tad spicier that other moles I have had but not too bad at all.

    Another (less adventurous) friend had the standard Steak burrito and a taco and barely had enough room to finish the taco as the burrito was much bigger (for the price) than he expected.

    All in all a great value for the price.

    The chips and salsa were great too as we went thru 2 sets before the meal came.

    I did ask but they did not carry Coke from Mexico as that would be a perfect topper to the meal.

    Another successful lunch brought to you by LTH. Thanks!
  • Post #17 - September 24th, 2007, 9:55 am
    Post #17 - September 24th, 2007, 9:55 am Post #17 - September 24th, 2007, 9:55 am
    Hey, is this still an accurate list of the La Quebrada empire, anyone? Are all these still open and under the Quebrada name?

    La Quebrada
    4859 W. Roosevelt, Cicero 708.780.8110
    3818 W. 63rd, Chicago 773.585.9943
    5100 S. California, Chicago 773.737.4575
    2906 W. Cermak, Chicago 773.277.7198
    723 S. Broadway, Aurora 630.896.2535

    I'm working on the very popular and soon-to-be-updated GNR PDF, so I want to make sure this is accurate. Thanks.
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  • Post #18 - September 24th, 2007, 11:13 am
    Post #18 - September 24th, 2007, 11:13 am Post #18 - September 24th, 2007, 11:13 am
    I believe there's one a few doors down from Birra Huentitan on the 4000 block of west North avenue.
    Lacking fins or tail
    The Gefilte fish
    swims with great difficulty.

    Jewish haiku.
  • Post #19 - September 24th, 2007, 2:57 pm
    Post #19 - September 24th, 2007, 2:57 pm Post #19 - September 24th, 2007, 2:57 pm
    The Aurora one is correct and they've also added a new location. I haven't been to this location yet.

    La Quebrada Express
    1204 E New York St
    Aurora, IL 60505
    (630) 585-9790
  • Post #20 - September 24th, 2007, 5:21 pm
    Post #20 - September 24th, 2007, 5:21 pm Post #20 - September 24th, 2007, 5:21 pm
    The Roosevelt location should still be golden...
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #21 - September 28th, 2007, 11:47 am
    Post #21 - September 28th, 2007, 11:47 am Post #21 - September 28th, 2007, 11:47 am
    Vital Information wrote:Over time, La Quebrada has spread. You have no excuse from finding your own location. Check the new menu because it may change soon.

    4859 W. Roosevelt - Cicero
    3818 W. 63rd - Chicago
    5100 S. California - Chicago
    2906 W. Cermak - Chicago
    723 S. Broadway - Aurora


    Lucky us...we live 3 blocks from the 63rd st. location. Our first visit was when they first opened this franchise about 3 years ago...just a little storefront, not appealing at all. Then they bought the place next door and combined it to make it one larger restaurant, and very attractive inside by Mexican storefront restaurant standards.

    But regarding your comment on the changing menu...yes...they no longer have an item on the menu I was addicted to. It was a meat option for any of the sopes, gorditas, tacos, huararches, and burritos...called "carne en chile de arbol". Oh man...the flavor was unbelievable. No, it wasn't simply meat doused in salsa, it is a little more than that.

    But the good thing is that they make it upon request. So if you want a great, flavorful item, ask for the burrito with carne en chile de arbol. It's addictive!
  • Post #22 - November 3rd, 2007, 8:27 pm
    Post #22 - November 3rd, 2007, 8:27 pm Post #22 - November 3rd, 2007, 8:27 pm
    Image

    I attended a 7-hour symposium today at the National Museum of Mexican Art and afterwards I walked the 1.5 miles to La Quebrada, at 2906 W. Cermak Road, Chicago.

    Image

    Well, I thought it was La Quebrada, but after getting home and looking at the photos I took I realized the name of the restaurant is La Quebradaita - and now wonder aloud whether this is been the name all along and it's not related to the chain of restaurants calling themselves La Quebrada, or if it's a place operating on its own with a name that's similar.

    Image

    As is typical in most Mexican restaurants in Chicago, not soon after you sit down the waitress comes along with a small bowl of a salsa, and some totopos (nacho-style tortilla chips). My chips and salsa arrived with the large glass of agua fresca de Tamarindo I ordered. The Tamarindo was great tasting; it hit the "spot" after my long walk to the restaurant. The totopos, though, were a disappointment: commercially produced, from a bag. The salsa was as good as I remembered it from my only other time at the restaurant, when I visited for breakfast/early lunch. The salsa de molcajete is what I remembered most about this restaurant; it's served warm, almost hot when brought to the table. It has a thick soup-like consistency.

    Image

    Image

    My entree choice was Combinación Mixto, which included a hot platter of portions of: skirt steak, chicken breast, shrimp, pulpo and red and green bell peppers, nopales, slices of thickly-sliced fried cheese and topped with radish. This hot platter was accompanied by a plate off which I was supposed to eat this feast and it included refried beans, rice and a small mound of shredded lettuce topped with a slice of tomato. For the $13.99 price tag, I thought this was a very good value.

    I wasn't expecting the pulpo and though it's not something I order with any regularity, I did try some of it and it tasted okay (I'm no judge of the taste of squid). The skirt steak wasn't bad, either - almost (but not) too much salt for my taste. The chicken was a disappointment. The shrimp, though small, were what one expects from frozen shrimp - but I have no complaint about them. The nopales were a bit overcooked for my liking, but the bell peppers and potato seemed cooked just right.

    A basked containing just 3 hand-made corn tortillas accompanied the meal, also (I've no doubt I could have had more, if I finished the first three and asked for more). Hand-made tortillas often turn-out too thick for my liking, and that's what happened at this meal. I think too much masa is being rolled up and pressed, or it's not being pressed firmly enough. Getting a tortilla that's thick in the "middle range" is tough to accomplish, I guess; either they're paper-thin and commercially produced or thicker than ideal hand-made.

    Image

    The meal was okay, even good but certainly not "great." I thought it a mistake to name an entire chain of restaurants (La Quebrada) "great" in the first place because I don't see how 4 or 5 (or more) restaurants operating under the same name are going to be functioning at a "greatness" quality consistently. Why not name McDonald's Chipotle chain of restaurants great, too?

    A by the way comment: We should probably clear-up any confusion about this particular location we're calling La Quebrada. Is it part of the group of restaurants, or is it simply a restaurant with a similar name and with different ownership/management?

    La Quebradita Restaurant
    2906 West Cermak Road
    Chicago, Illinois
  • Post #23 - November 3rd, 2007, 9:08 pm
    Post #23 - November 3rd, 2007, 9:08 pm Post #23 - November 3rd, 2007, 9:08 pm
    Sounds like a mixed bag. Not sure that the local Quebrada chain has any lock on the very popular name of the place in Acapulco. Can anyone verify the connection? In any event, the mini-chains don't tend to bee too consistent. Consider Las Islas Marias.

    PS, for other readers, I think Bill miswrote: pulpo is octopus.
  • Post #24 - November 4th, 2007, 10:52 am
    Post #24 - November 4th, 2007, 10:52 am Post #24 - November 4th, 2007, 10:52 am
    [quote="Bill
    Well, I thought it was La Quebrada, but after getting home and looking at the photos I took I realized the name of the restaurant is La Quebradaita - and now wonder aloud whether this is been the name all along and it's not related to the chain of restaurants calling themselves La Quebrada, or if it's a place operating on its own with a name that's similar. [/quote]

    Excellent report and pictures, Bill. Really enjoyed it and the descriptions. The "ita" after la Quebradita means "little", as in little La Quebrada, just as chiquita and chiquito refer to a little girl and boy.
    Your description of the warm salsa and thick corn tortillas assure me it's part of the La Quebrada Chicago chain. We frequent the 63rd street location. Since becoming a regular, they will "hook me up" with extra corn tortillas to take home, since I like the homemade flavor and texture.
  • Post #25 - November 4th, 2007, 11:05 am
    Post #25 - November 4th, 2007, 11:05 am Post #25 - November 4th, 2007, 11:05 am
    BTW, I saw that VI noted elsewhere that the flagship La Quebrada mentioned La Quebradita as an outpost, so it's obviously related. I had sort of wondered whether this was a place that was trying just to emulate the style and success of the original.

    I'm a fan of thicker tortillas too, and I really like the particularly suave masa they use at the Roosevelt road La Quebrada. I think they said they used La Guadalupena when I asked long ago.
  • Post #26 - September 13th, 2010, 7:17 am
    Post #26 - September 13th, 2010, 7:17 am Post #26 - September 13th, 2010, 7:17 am
    Wife and I went to La Quebrada for the first time in a few years. Have they always had the 10-foot wide projection TV? It was on and the volume was cranked up so we could all watch "America's Dumbest Criminals," starring Tonya Harding, Todd Bridges, and Danny Bonaduce.

    No need to talk with annoying family members. Just watch the car crashes and gun fights!
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #27 - September 13th, 2010, 10:12 am
    Post #27 - September 13th, 2010, 10:12 am Post #27 - September 13th, 2010, 10:12 am
    teatpuller wrote:Wife and I went to La Quebrada for the first time in a few years. Have they always had the 10-foot wide projection TV? It was on and the volume was cranked up so we could all watch "America's Dumbest Criminals," starring Tonya Harding, Todd Bridges, and Danny Bonaduce.

    No need to talk with annoying family members. Just watch the car crashes and gun fights!


    Which location was this?
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #28 - September 13th, 2010, 10:57 am
    Post #28 - September 13th, 2010, 10:57 am Post #28 - September 13th, 2010, 10:57 am
    Kman wrote:Which location was this?


    Cicero, sorry for not being clear.
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #29 - September 13th, 2010, 4:40 pm
    Post #29 - September 13th, 2010, 4:40 pm Post #29 - September 13th, 2010, 4:40 pm
    Wife and I went to La Quebrada for the first time in a few years. Have they always had the 10-foot wide projection TV? It was on and the volume was cranked up so we could all watch "America's Dumbest Criminals," starring Tonya Harding, Todd Bridges, and Danny Bonaduce.


    They have had that fabulous TV there for at least a year, as far as I can remember. It also can get quite loud now, not that it was ever quiet there with the jukebox playing in the background. But at least it gives one more thing for my 3 year old to pay attention to when we go. :)
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #30 - October 17th, 2010, 7:50 pm
    Post #30 - October 17th, 2010, 7:50 pm Post #30 - October 17th, 2010, 7:50 pm
    The mediocre La Quebrada Express - a fast food version and a blight on the brand - is thankfully defunct (was on New York Street in Aurora, near Ohio if I recall correctly).

    Need to go back to either the Aurora or Cicero outposts for a grilled meat fix.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy

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