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Sauerkraut or bust!
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  • Post #61 - October 17th, 2010, 8:41 pm
    Post #61 - October 17th, 2010, 8:41 pm Post #61 - October 17th, 2010, 8:41 pm
    Anyone krauting this year? The A&G (supermarket at Belmont and Central) had cabbage for 15 cents a pound, so we made 20 pounds of kraut this year. Last year I only did 10 pounds-- maybe I will give the excess as Christmas presents!

    Jen
  • Post #62 - October 17th, 2010, 11:24 pm
    Post #62 - October 17th, 2010, 11:24 pm Post #62 - October 17th, 2010, 11:24 pm
    I bought what feels like about a 15lb head of cabbage for $1 at Bultema's farmstand on Route 30 just west of 394 (Lynwood?) it's a beauty too--could see folks picking them just to the east of the stand. They said they should have them through the end of the month and I'm back and forth regularly so if anyone needs...just let me know.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #63 - October 19th, 2010, 9:59 am
    Post #63 - October 19th, 2010, 9:59 am Post #63 - October 19th, 2010, 9:59 am
    I've been waiting for this thread to pop up. Now I'm ready to get Krauting!
  • Post #64 - October 22nd, 2010, 8:29 am
    Post #64 - October 22nd, 2010, 8:29 am Post #64 - October 22nd, 2010, 8:29 am
    Got my Kraut on last night. Went with a larger shred, just to change things up. Can't wait!
  • Post #65 - December 27th, 2010, 8:26 pm
    Post #65 - December 27th, 2010, 8:26 pm Post #65 - December 27th, 2010, 8:26 pm
    My kraut didn't turn out that great this year-- I foolishly used Morton's kosher salt instead of my usual Diamond and it came out a bit salty, with a weak ferment. But still tasty-- I just have to give it a rinse and not add any additional salt. Live and learn!

    On another forum, someone posted about the Harsch fermenting crock. Does anyone here have experience with these? They are expensive (about $115 for the 7.5 liter, plus $30 shipping on amazon) but I have an amazon gift certificate burning a hole in my virtual pocket. I welcome your thoughts and input-- worth it, or should I stick with my jar?

    Also, did anyone catch the New Yorker article on "radical fermentation"?
    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010 ... act_bilger
    It was a bit overdone-- they lumped the krauters together with the dumpster scavengers and dudes eating "high meat", but it was interesting.

    Jen
  • Post #66 - March 30th, 2011, 3:27 pm
    Post #66 - March 30th, 2011, 3:27 pm Post #66 - March 30th, 2011, 3:27 pm
    Bumping this . . .
    Pie-love wrote:On another forum, someone posted about the Harsch fermenting crock. Does anyone here have experience with these? They are expensive (about $115 for the 7.5 liter, plus $30 shipping on amazon) but I have an amazon gift certificate burning a hole in my virtual pocket. I welcome your thoughts and input-- worth it, or should I stick with my jar?

    I'm considering buying a Harsch-style fermenting crock. I don't think I've ever lost an entire batch of pickles, but have fought mold in a variety of colors and have had some pickles turn mushy. I'm hoping that a Harsch-style crock would solve these problems and lead to better results, while not having to skim the mold every few days.

    Does anyone have any input about whether these are worth it? And, is Harsch the best or are other similarly styled and less expensive brands acceptable?

    Thanks,
    Ronna
  • Post #67 - March 31st, 2011, 10:35 am
    Post #67 - March 31st, 2011, 10:35 am Post #67 - March 31st, 2011, 10:35 am
    Pie-love wrote:My kraut didn't turn out that great this year-- I foolishly used Morton's kosher salt instead of my usual Diamond and it came out a bit salty, with a weak ferment. But still tasty-- I just have to give it a rinse and not add any additional salt. Live and learn

    I only use salt specific for canning. It is pure salt without any additives or flowing agents. Read the label of Kosher salt, it usually has some additives or flowing agents. In foods preserved for an extended period of time, these additives contribute to the food darkening.

    For pickles and sauerkraut, I use a five-gallon food safe plastic. I have sometimes had issues with yeast, I then added some vinegar to suppress it. For the cost of next to nothing, I have what I need.

    There is a product you might want to consider. At Minos Imports they had a plastic container with a tight fitting lid used for fermenting olives. Frankly it could be used to ferment whatever you wanted. It was dark brown, rather tall with a hefty price of less than $10. If I didn't already have something suitable and was getting into fermenting, I would have bought it.

    Minos Imports
    648 W Lake St
    Addison IL
    630-543-0337

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #68 - March 31st, 2011, 12:18 pm
    Post #68 - March 31st, 2011, 12:18 pm Post #68 - March 31st, 2011, 12:18 pm
    REB wrote:Bumping this . . .
    Pie-love wrote:On another forum, someone posted about the Harsch fermenting crock. Does anyone here have experience with these? They are expensive (about $115 for the 7.5 liter, plus $30 shipping on amazon) but I have an amazon gift certificate burning a hole in my virtual pocket. I welcome your thoughts and input-- worth it, or should I stick with my jar?

    I'm considering buying a Harsch-style fermenting crock. I don't think I've ever lost an entire batch of pickles, but have fought mold in a variety of colors and have had some pickles turn mushy. I'm hoping that a Harsch-style crock would solve these problems and lead to better results, while not having to skim the mold every few days.

    Does anyone have any input about whether these are worth it? And, is Harsch the best or are other similarly styled and less expensive brands acceptable?

    Thanks,
    Ronna


    After years of having mold problems with conventional crocks I purchased a 20l Harsch crock and the first year was pickles with 100% success and the next year kraut with also 100% success. Last year the 20l was filled with Jalapeno/Habenero mash and is still fermenting. The year before i purchased a 5l Harsch and made a trial batch of the Jalapeno/Habenero mash and subsequently bottled with labels. Worked great!
    In my opinion there is nothing better than a Harsch!-Dick
  • Post #69 - March 31st, 2011, 12:26 pm
    Post #69 - March 31st, 2011, 12:26 pm Post #69 - March 31st, 2011, 12:26 pm
    budrichard wrote:After years of having mold problems with conventional crocks I purchased a 20l Harsch crock and the first year was pickles with 100% success and the next year kraut with also 100% success. Last year the 20l was filled with Jalapeno/Habenero mash and is still fermenting. The year before i purchased a 5l Harsch and made a trial batch of the Jalapeno/Habenero mash and subsequently bottled with labels. Worked great!
    In my opinion there is nothing better than a Harsch!-Dick
    Thanks so much for the feedback. Are you glad you went with the 20L? I know everyone's needs are different, but I'm trying to decide if 15L is big enough. I usually don't fill a two gallon glass jar, but who knows what I'll want to do in the future?

    Ronna
  • Post #70 - March 31st, 2011, 12:44 pm
    Post #70 - March 31st, 2011, 12:44 pm Post #70 - March 31st, 2011, 12:44 pm
    It's really a crapshoot as to size. 5l is small and I used that size because I simply did not have enough material for anything larger and now it is a nice size for smaller batches and tests. This year it has Tobasco peppers raised locally and picked by me. It really takes a LOT of picking and many pickings to obtain 5l of mash of Tobasco peppers, but the 20l size is readily filled with pickles, kraut and most ingredients. Pickles once canned last forever, my kraut was subsequently canned and will have lasted 2 years so with one crock, you can pickle alternate items in alternate years.
    15l may be fine for your uses, just be aware that the crock is not filled to the lid but one stops where the sides begin to curve inward so I'm not sure the a 20l Harsch crock holds 20l of material.-Dick
  • Post #71 - March 31st, 2011, 1:03 pm
    Post #71 - March 31st, 2011, 1:03 pm Post #71 - March 31st, 2011, 1:03 pm
    budrichard wrote:It's really a crapshoot as to size. 5l is small and I used that size because I simply did not have enough material for anything larger and now it is a nice size for smaller batches and tests. This year it has Tobasco peppers raised locally and picked by me. It really takes a LOT of picking and many pickings to obtain 5l of mash of Tobasco peppers, but the 20l size is readily filled with pickles, kraut and most ingredients. Pickles once canned last forever, my kraut was subsequently canned and will have lasted 2 years so with one crock, you can pickle alternate items in alternate years.
    15l may be fine for your uses, just be aware that the crock is not filled to the lid but one stops where the sides begin to curve inward so I'm not sure the a 20l Harsch crock holds 20l of material.-Dick
    All good to know, thanks.

    Ronna
  • Post #72 - April 10th, 2011, 5:19 pm
    Post #72 - April 10th, 2011, 5:19 pm Post #72 - April 10th, 2011, 5:19 pm
    Pie-love wrote:My kraut didn't turn out that great this year-- I foolishly used Morton's kosher salt instead of my usual Diamond and it came out a bit salty, with a weak ferment. But still tasty-- I just have to give it a rinse and not add any additional salt. Live and learn!

    On another forum, someone posted about the Harsch fermenting crock. Does anyone here have experience with these? They are expensive (about $115 for the 7.5 liter, plus $30 shipping on amazon) but I have an amazon gift certificate burning a hole in my virtual pocket. I welcome your thoughts and input-- worth it, or should I stick with my jar?

    Jen


    Why didn't I read this thread before I started krauting????

    For Valentine's Day, my SO got me the 7.5L Harsch crock. (For those of you who think this isn't romantic, I say HA! My favorite gifts are a) surprises - I never ever saw this thing prior to opening the box and b) show how well the person knows me. In other words, perfect gift!)

    I followed the crock instructions for the cabbage to salt ratio. The type of salt was not specified. I used Morton's kosher. I was traveling while the fermenting bubbles should have been audible - SO says that he didn't hear anything.This weekend was 6 weeks and I opened the crock. Same story as Pie-love: weak ferment and salty sauerkraut. Tasty, but not what I expected.
  • Post #73 - April 11th, 2011, 4:28 pm
    Post #73 - April 11th, 2011, 4:28 pm Post #73 - April 11th, 2011, 4:28 pm
    Krauting is temperature dependent and yeast dependent. The yeast in yogurt whey is the correct type.
    The Harsch crock comes with good instructions. Did you follow the instructions?
    When I kraut in October with the kraut in my cool basement, it takes 2-3 months at least. Kraut likes 70F and above.
    I also use a lot of whey to assure I have the correct yeast.
    Add some whey and wait and don't open the lid for at least two months depending on temperature.-Dick
  • Post #74 - April 11th, 2011, 4:41 pm
    Post #74 - April 11th, 2011, 4:41 pm Post #74 - April 11th, 2011, 4:41 pm
    HI,

    I was also thinking there might be a temperature issue here. If it drops below 60 degrees, fermentation stops.

    Kosher salt measures differently than table or canning salt. You really want to use canning salt because it is salt with no iodine or flowing agents.

    A few years ago, I used a lighted lightbulb placed near my kraut to keep the temperature suitable for fermentation.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #75 - April 12th, 2011, 12:26 pm
    Post #75 - April 12th, 2011, 12:26 pm Post #75 - April 12th, 2011, 12:26 pm
    I had many of fermentation experiments at my house and some have turned out delicious and others lets say really stunk up the place (fermented beets!!!). I bought the book Wild Fermentation a few years back and had alot of success with it. The author Sandor Katz actually got back to me when I posted a question on his board! Very nice person and I really appreciated the personal touch of his communication. I believe that he was publishing another edition but for those that like ferments he really has it down.
    http://www.wildfermentation.com/
  • Post #76 - April 12th, 2011, 1:48 pm
    Post #76 - April 12th, 2011, 1:48 pm Post #76 - April 12th, 2011, 1:48 pm
    budrichard wrote:Krauting is temperature dependent and yeast dependent. The yeast in yogurt whey is the correct type.
    The Harsch crock comes with good instructions. Did you follow the instructions?
    When I kraut in October with the kraut in my cool basement, it takes 2-3 months at least. Kraut likes 70F and above.
    I also use a lot of whey to assure I have the correct yeast.
    Add some whey and wait and don't open the lid for at least two months depending on temperature.-Dick


    Dick - I hoped you would respond! Thanks.

    I did follow the instructions. I also moved my crock into the basement (low 60s) after 2 weeks in the kitchen (high 60s-low 70s.)
    But didn't know what success looked like. I may be a hard grader. Today, my (kraut-making) Serbian friend tried mine and deemed it ready! good! (but agreed it is too salty and in need of a rinse before eating/cooking.)

    After digging around, I see endorsement for sea salt (Eastern European YouTube lady) or canning/pickling salt (Cathy). What kind of salt do you favor? Nowhere did I see anything about whey. Makes sense, though.

    Kimchi is next. Any tips?
  • Post #77 - April 13th, 2011, 11:56 am
    Post #77 - April 13th, 2011, 11:56 am Post #77 - April 13th, 2011, 11:56 am
    To answer your questions:
    Success is a translucent product of good taste and color, salt can always be reduced by rinsing.
    If not translucent than it is not ready but can be used as cooking ingredient.
    Sea salt is the same as any Kosher or canning salt as the salt was formed from dried up sea water eons ago. I use Carey Salt which is the cheapest Pickling & Canning salt at Woodman's but certainly Morton Kosher will do nicely. Diamond Crystal Kosher has bigger crystals and I don't believe it will dissolve as readily.
    I have made one batch of Kimchi and then pressure canned it.
    My advice is to stay away from adding any oysters or non-vegetable matter for your first batches as I did. Get a good authentic recipe and go to H-Mart for the ingredients.
    I use 'Growing Up In A Korean Kitchen as a guide' but the recipe can be very simple, you just need the right cabbage, Diakon, salt and Korean Red Pepper ground. It turned out very nice.
    The instructions that usually come with the Harsch Crock mention whey I believe. In any event what you don't want is bad yeast to take over and the yeast in whey is the right yeast and putting whey in your fermenting assures the correct yeast.
    Good luck.-Dick
  • Post #78 - April 13th, 2011, 12:34 pm
    Post #78 - April 13th, 2011, 12:34 pm Post #78 - April 13th, 2011, 12:34 pm
    HI,

    I would read the label for any salt you plan to use for canning and pickling. If it has iodine or flow agents, avoid it. It will contribute to darkening of your product.

    Kosher salt measures differently than regular salt. If you insist on using it, then refer to this:

    Subject: How are you cooking your heritage turkey?

    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    Tablesalt often has some extra chemicals to keep it free flowing, though it is not always iodized. Remember the Morton Salt motto, "When it rains, it pours!" In some areas of the world, the salt has neither iodine or chemicals to keep free flowing, then you will see rice in the salt shakers in an attempt to keep things loose.

    Kosher salt is something when I run out, it doesn't pop back on the shopping list until the next time it is needed. I always have canning salt which does not have any chemicals nor iodine, so I substitute by weight as Ed suggested earlier. The canning salt does get clumpy, so I keep it in quart jars to minimize the problem.

    I was just reading the basic brining primer in CI, which offers a direct volume comparative for the salt:
    1/2 Diamond Crystal Kosher = 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons Morton Kosher = 1/4 cup table salt
    So those who don't keep gram/ounce scales in their kitchens have something to refer to.

    Happy Thanksgiving ... and now I have to brine a bird!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #79 - April 13th, 2011, 3:41 pm
    Post #79 - April 13th, 2011, 3:41 pm Post #79 - April 13th, 2011, 3:41 pm
    wendy wrote:Kimchi is next. Any tips?


    I had great success with this recipe from Fine Cooking:
    http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/homemade-kimchi.aspx

    It came out spicy, juicy, with just the right amount of funk.

    Jen
  • Post #80 - April 22nd, 2011, 12:46 pm
    Post #80 - April 22nd, 2011, 12:46 pm Post #80 - April 22nd, 2011, 12:46 pm
    budrichard wrote:Krauting is temperature dependent and yeast dependent. The yeast in yogurt whey is the correct type.

    The microorganisms in yogurt and sauerkraut are bacteria, not yeast (elephants and humans are much more related than bacteria and yeast). The species of bacteria used to make yogurt are different than those commonly found in naturally fermenting sauerkraut.

    Two types of bacteria are almost always added to milk to make yogurt: Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Sometimes other species of bacteria ("probiotics") are also added for their reputed health benefits. These include Lactobacillus acidophilus and various Bifidobacterium species. Microbiologically, not all yogurts are the same.

    Sauerkraut fermentation is traditionally done without addition of starter cultures. The high salt concentration (typically 2.25% by weight) inhibits the growth of unwanted bacteria. Fermentation proceeds in sequential waves. Initially Leuconostoc mesenteroides is often the predominant organism. As lactic acid levels increase, Lactobacillus brevis takes over, followed by Pediococcus pentosaceus and then Lactobacillus plantarum.

    I'm not sure what's going on in sauerkraut fermentations with added yogurt whey. I suspect the high salt suppresses growth of L bulgaricus (that species doesn't grow above 2% NaCl) and the relatively low temperatures don't favor growth of S thermophilus (its optimum is over 100° F) so fermentation proceeds essentially as if they weren't added. Sauerkraut conditions shouldn't kill the yogurt bacteria so they probably make some contribution to the microbial population. It would be interesting to analyze the bacteria during fermentation to see what species are present.

    Looking at various sauerkraut recipes on the internet, I see this yogurt whey method pop up over and over. I'm curious where it arose and if it has any scientific basis. I'm not saying you can't make excellent sauerkraut if you follow it, only that (microbiologically speaking) you may not be doing what you think.
  • Post #81 - September 6th, 2011, 4:09 pm
    Post #81 - September 6th, 2011, 4:09 pm Post #81 - September 6th, 2011, 4:09 pm
    Question....I did not see an answer to whether you can make sauerkraut in a plastic pail (food grade???). Wonder where to get those. We previously made it in a large vintage crock but after a few moves I have lost track of it and not sure I want to commit to buying such a heavy thing again. Pls advise..maybe will make some soon...sauerkraut season is coming soon.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #82 - September 6th, 2011, 4:17 pm
    Post #82 - September 6th, 2011, 4:17 pm Post #82 - September 6th, 2011, 4:17 pm
    toria wrote:Question....I did not see an answer to whether you can make sauerkraut in a plastic pail (food grade???). Wonder where to get those. We previously made it in a large vintage crock but after a few moves I have lost track of it and not sure I want to commit to buying such a heavy thing again. Pls advise..maybe will make some soon...sauerkraut season is coming soon.

    Hi,

    I used a 5-gallon food grade plastic pail, which I received from Gus at Wiener and Still Champion. I have also been known to pester local fast food places for these buckets, too.

    I once overfilled the sauerkraut pail with 35 pounds of hand sliced cabbage. In the first week of fermentation, there is some bubbling. This shifts your firmly packed cabbage about. It also knocked the single quart jar filled with water on its side. I now use two jars to keep it weighted.

    Last year, I did 30-pounds cabbage which provided enough room for things to shift.

    My fermented dill pickles are just about done. I hope to begin sauerkraut soon. I may make two batches this year, because I tend to give it away too quickly.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #83 - September 7th, 2011, 10:45 am
    Post #83 - September 7th, 2011, 10:45 am Post #83 - September 7th, 2011, 10:45 am
    Thanks Cathy. I am thinking of making the kraut in a largish jar. Also the tip you provided about the Minos Imports olive fermenting pail might work and I pass by there a lot. I don't have a tremendous ambition to make a huge amount this year maybe next.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #84 - September 26th, 2011, 9:19 am
    Post #84 - September 26th, 2011, 9:19 am Post #84 - September 26th, 2011, 9:19 am
    Cabbage is on sale at the A&G (Belmont and Central) for $0.19/lb this week and their flyer declares that "It's Krauting season!!". I scored three plump cabbages today and I have the correct salt (Diamond Kosher for me).

    Anyone else ready to kraut?

    Jen
  • Post #85 - September 26th, 2011, 10:00 am
    Post #85 - September 26th, 2011, 10:00 am Post #85 - September 26th, 2011, 10:00 am
    toria wrote:Thanks Cathy. I am thinking of making the kraut in a largish jar. Also the tip you provided about the Minos Imports olive fermenting pail might work and I pass by there a lot. I don't have a tremendous ambition to make a huge amount this year maybe next.


    My local bakery has the pails with lids for $1.oo. I have bought them for wine making use in the past. Lots of food related businesses use them.
  • Post #86 - September 26th, 2011, 11:38 am
    Post #86 - September 26th, 2011, 11:38 am Post #86 - September 26th, 2011, 11:38 am
    LikestoEatout wrote:
    toria wrote:Thanks Cathy. I am thinking of making the kraut in a largish jar. Also the tip you provided about the Minos Imports olive fermenting pail might work and I pass by there a lot. I don't have a tremendous ambition to make a huge amount this year maybe next.


    My local bakery has the pails with lids for $1.oo. I have bought them for wine making use in the past. Lots of food related businesses use them.


    Care to share the name of your local? I am about ready to take the plunge but need the buckets...
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #87 - October 2nd, 2011, 11:25 am
    Post #87 - October 2nd, 2011, 11:25 am Post #87 - October 2nd, 2011, 11:25 am
    I love the idea of making kraut in the liner of my crock pot. Since I have three crock pots I have some that are plenty big to make the kraut without buy anything new. I had a lovely crock when I lived in Skokie...it was huge and sat on the floor and that is what I make kraut in but for the life of me I don't know what happened to it. I am not so ambitious now and will make a smaller batch. Where to buy diamond salt?

    I make some sauerkraut and kielbasa last week with Bubbie's kraut and it was good. Even my mom says its delicious and asks how I make it. She says hers never turns out that way. Yum Yum.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #88 - October 2nd, 2011, 12:16 pm
    Post #88 - October 2nd, 2011, 12:16 pm Post #88 - October 2nd, 2011, 12:16 pm
    Hi,

    BudRichard has long mentioned a very inexpensive source for cabbage in Wisconsin. Since my usual suppliers have sold out, largely because they had crop issues.

    I just called Bud's favorite source to verify I can buy roughly 100 pounds of cabbage for around $6-7. I only need 30 pounds. Maybe 60 if I can talk myself into a double batch.

    If others want to share a bag, I will get the big deal. Otherwise I buy what I need. I was told if nobody was in the barn when I arrived, to call them:

    GITZLAFF FARMS INC
    2441 100TH AVE
    KENOSHA, WI 53144-7746
    (262) 859-3045

    Let me know here or by PM.

    I have tomatoes and Concord grapes to process. Once I am done, then I am willing to get those cabbages.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #89 - October 2nd, 2011, 4:28 pm
    Post #89 - October 2nd, 2011, 4:28 pm Post #89 - October 2nd, 2011, 4:28 pm
    I plan to make only a small amount of sauerkraut like one big head's worth. So its probably just as easy buying a cabbage here or there. Does your source pre shred the cabbage or is it by the head?
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #90 - October 2nd, 2011, 7:09 pm
    Post #90 - October 2nd, 2011, 7:09 pm Post #90 - October 2nd, 2011, 7:09 pm
    HI,

    Torie - this is not shredded, though you really wouldn't want it preshredded.

    Unexpectedly ended up buying the cabbage today. The cost was $8 for a 50 pound bag. I need 30 pounds. Ms Ingie may or may not want the rest, but certainly some of it.

    The address above will be changed to the correct address on Highway E. This is quite an operation with a huge barn, which is a refrigerated warehouse for the picked cabbage. There were huge crates for transporting them waiting outside. A field with immature cabbage plants that will be harvested sometime late this year.

    There is nothing on the exterior to suggest the public is welcome to buy cabbage. I'm sure they only want serious quantities purchased. Yet the woman on the phone was quite happy to sell me whatever quantity I wanted.

    I suggest calling first before venturing out.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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