LTH Home

You've got to sink your teeth into Katy's Dumplings! [long]

You've got to sink your teeth into Katy's Dumplings! [long]
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 10 of 23
  • Post #271 - August 29th, 2008, 9:10 am
    Post #271 - August 29th, 2008, 9:10 am Post #271 - August 29th, 2008, 9:10 am
    Love the pic of Stevez in his natural habitat, G!
  • Post #272 - September 13th, 2008, 4:06 pm
    Post #272 - September 13th, 2008, 4:06 pm Post #272 - September 13th, 2008, 4:06 pm
    The perfect cure for a rainy day...

    Image

    Dan Dan noodles at Katy's and a good book.

    Worth the round trip from the city every time.
    "Baseball is like church. Many attend. Few understand." Leo Durocher
  • Post #273 - September 15th, 2008, 9:45 am
    Post #273 - September 15th, 2008, 9:45 am Post #273 - September 15th, 2008, 9:45 am
    Oh goodness, we went on an ill-fated trip to the Aurora outlet stores on Saturday (with 2 bookend stops at Sonic for strawberry slushes and cherry limeades). On the way home I was wet and cold and kept whining about wanting nothing but a big steaming bowl of dan dan noodles. I even found Katy's in the GPS (never been there, but it's so on the list) but we didn't end up going. Sigh...
  • Post #274 - September 19th, 2008, 12:22 pm
    Post #274 - September 19th, 2008, 12:22 pm Post #274 - September 19th, 2008, 12:22 pm
    I am going to now make a statement that some might call blasphemous, so please hang on to your seats: I do not think the dumplings at Katy's are very good. :o

    Now please, before anyone gets defensive, let me say that I love Katy's. I work nearby, and so have eaten there many times, and there is no better version of Asian noodle dishes that I have had. The Stir fried noodle with dry chili, the beef tendon noodle soup, and especially the Shredded pork stir fry with "pancake" are all superb. Just today I had the Dan Dan Noodle again, and it was as excellent as I remembered, with toothsome noodles in a nicely numbing Szechuan broth.

    But the dumplings..... I had the boiled dumplings once many months ago and found them slightly watery and tasteless. Writing it off as a bad day, I said nothing. But today I ordered the potstickers (thinking maybe a little crispiness would help), and again I was less than enthused. The "crispy" bottoms were not very crispy, the dumpling skin had none of the "toothiness" that the noodles have, the dumplings themselves were somewhat watery, and the pork and bok choy (or cabbage?) was not very flavorful, especially because the vinegar in them was the only real taste that I could percieve. So why do others on this board talk about the dumplings here as being so good? I admit they are better than commercially made dumplings, but the cigar-shaped potstickers that I had at the International Mall's dumpling stand down the street were sensational, just leaps and bounds better.

    So what am I missing regarding Katy's dumplings? Did I catch 2 bad days? Is it because others rarely get to have homemade dumplings?
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #275 - September 19th, 2008, 12:36 pm
    Post #275 - September 19th, 2008, 12:36 pm Post #275 - September 19th, 2008, 12:36 pm
    borborigmy wrote:I am going to now make a statement that some might call blasphemous, so please hang on to your seats: I do not think the dumplings at Katy's are very good. :o

    Now please, before anyone gets defensive, let me say that I love Katy's. I work nearby, and so have eaten there many times, and there is no better version of Asian noodle dishes that I have had. The Stir fried noodle with dry chili, the beef tendon noodle soup, and especially the Shredded pork stir fry with "pancake" are all superb. Just today I had the Dan Dan Noodle again, and it was as excellent as I remembered, with toothsome noodles in a nicely numbing Szechuan broth.

    But the dumplings..... I had the boiled dumplings once many months ago and found them slightly watery and tasteless. Writing it off as a bad day, I said nothing. But today I ordered the potstickers (thinking maybe a little crispiness would help), and again I was less than enthused. The "crispy" bottoms were not very crispy, the dumpling skin had none of the "toothiness" that the noodles have, the dumplings themselves were somewhat watery, and the pork and bok choy (or cabbage?) was not very flavorful, especially because the vinegar in them was the only real taste that I could percieve. So why do others on this board talk about the dumplings here as being so good? I admit they are better than commercially made dumplings, but the cigar-shaped potstickers that I had at the International Mall's dumpling stand down the street were sensational, just leaps and bounds better.

    So what am I missing regarding Katy's dumplings? Did I catch 2 bad days? Is it because others rarely get to have homemade dumplings?

    I like their dumplings very much and even buy some to take home from time to time but I have to say that it's their noodles -- and that chopped up pancake -- to which I have become addicted. Perhaps, though, it was a bad day today for the dumplings.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #276 - September 19th, 2008, 1:03 pm
    Post #276 - September 19th, 2008, 1:03 pm Post #276 - September 19th, 2008, 1:03 pm
    borborigmy wrote:But the dumplings..... I had the boiled dumplings once many months ago and found them slightly watery and tasteless. Writing it off as a bad day, I said nothing. But today I ordered the potstickers (thinking maybe a little crispiness would help), and again I was less than enthused. The "crispy" bottoms were not very crispy, the dumpling skin had none of the "toothiness" that the noodles have, the dumplings themselves were somewhat watery, and the pork and bok choy (or cabbage?) was not very flavorful, especially because the vinegar in them was the only real taste that I could percieve. So why do others on this board talk about the dumplings here as being so good? I admit they are better than commercially made dumplings, but the cigar-shaped potstickers that I had at the International Mall's dumpling stand down the street were sensational, just leaps and bounds better.

    So what am I missing regarding Katy's dumplings? Did I catch 2 bad days? Is it because others rarely get to have homemade dumplings?


    I think one thing to keep in mind is that the kind of "water dumplings" (or shui jiao) sold there are somewhat different from potstickers that are offered in many Chinese restaurants. In at least my Chinese family growing up, the filling was not heavily seasoned and each person would put together a dipping sauce more to his/her taste. You would also make a meal out of only dumplings, so that you also wouldn't necessarily want each aggressively seasoned. Then again, many people would use a (strongly flavored) dipping sauce for each dumpling, even when eating a couple of platefuls. The dumplings themselves will come out on the watery side. Indeed, many people drink the cooking water used to make the dumplings. Another thing to try is that I think they have different types of fillings there. I always prefer dumplings with Chinese chives (jiu cai) in the filling.

    I haven't tried the potstickers at Katy's (actually I've only ever bought take out frozen dumplings from there) so I don't know if they use the same ones as for the shui jiao. One common thing that many families do is to pan fry or deep fry leftover dumplings that have already been boiled. The texture is quite different from having been boiled first. I'm frankly not sure where the potstickers that you tend to see in Chinese restaurants come from. They're certainly not like the traditional guo tie (literally, potstickers). They may come from some traditional Chinese form of dumpling, or they may be an Ameri-Chinese restaurant invention.
  • Post #277 - September 19th, 2008, 1:12 pm
    Post #277 - September 19th, 2008, 1:12 pm Post #277 - September 19th, 2008, 1:12 pm
    I think one thing to keep in mind is that the kind of "water dumplings" (or shui jiao) sold there are somewhat different from potstickers that are offered in many Chinese restaurants.


    Thanks, Hao, I did not know that in regards to the various dumplings found in the Chinese restaurants. I do believe that Katy's pot stickers are the shui jiao dumplings that they have boiled first and then fried, which definitely does change the texture from what I am used to (basically steamed and crisped in the wok/pan). My one question for Katy's would then be: where are your sauces for me to enhance the dumplings? They have soy sauce and hot sauce on the table, but it really did nothing for the dumplings today.
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #278 - September 19th, 2008, 6:44 pm
    Post #278 - September 19th, 2008, 6:44 pm Post #278 - September 19th, 2008, 6:44 pm
    borborigmy wrote:
    I do believe that Katy's pot stickers are the shui jiao dumplings that they have boiled first and then fried, which definitely does change the texture from what I am used to (basically steamed and crisped in the wok/pan).


    Every occasion when we've ordered the guo tie, we've been served guo tie. If your potstickers did not look like the following, you were mis-served... and maltreated...

    Image
  • Post #279 - September 19th, 2008, 9:52 pm
    Post #279 - September 19th, 2008, 9:52 pm Post #279 - September 19th, 2008, 9:52 pm
    I also always ask for the pork and chive filling. They are much more flavorful than the default version.

    For sauce, combine soy sauce and black vinegar in whatever proportion tastes good to you. Add chili oil if that is your thing.
  • Post #280 - September 20th, 2008, 10:46 am
    Post #280 - September 20th, 2008, 10:46 am Post #280 - September 20th, 2008, 10:46 am
    Every occasion when we've ordered the guo tie, we've been served guo tie. If your potstickers did not look like the following, you were mis-served... and maltreated...


    The odd thing is that they DID look like that, although a little more water logged. It is hard to tell in the picture if they have been boiled or steamed before the frying. Perhaps it is that I just don't like their version of guo tie, or more likely I am not used to shui jiao dumplings that are then treated as potstickers. If someone ever goes to the International Mall and tries the dumpling stand's guo tie (which are similar to Ed's Potstickers), you would understand where I am coming from.

    For sauce, combine soy sauce and black vinegar in whatever proportion tastes good to you. Add chili oil if that is your thing.


    The dumplings I had yesterday had so much vinegar in them, there is no way you would need any more black vinegar to be added in the sauce. They really had much more vinegar taste than I am used to in a dumpling - just overpowering.

    Perhaps I should ask for the pork and chive version next time, but I may wait to just beg and borrow one off an LTH'ers plate if they happen to be at Katy's the same time as me so I don't get disappointed again.
    "My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

    -Orson Welles-
  • Post #281 - September 20th, 2008, 3:12 pm
    Post #281 - September 20th, 2008, 3:12 pm Post #281 - September 20th, 2008, 3:12 pm
    borborigmy wrote:The dumplings I had yesterday had so much vinegar in them, there is no way you would need any more black vinegar to be added in the sauce. They really had much more vinegar taste than I am used to in a dumpling - just overpowering.

    :shock:

    That sounds highly unusual to me - that there would be vinegar at all.

    Now, I'm not saying Katy's guo tie are the cat's pajama's - I actually don't care for them, but the better half likes the doughy lumpkins; Then again she also insists on ordering spring rolls at Shiu Wah :roll: You can take the girl out of Tokyo, but you can't take Yokohama Chinatown out of the girl...
  • Post #282 - September 22nd, 2008, 12:02 pm
    Post #282 - September 22nd, 2008, 12:02 pm Post #282 - September 22nd, 2008, 12:02 pm
    I've never had dumplings while eating in at Katy's, but the vinegar thing sounds odd to me. I have bought some frozen packages from them and they did not have any vinegar in them, nor is that usual for these dumplings generally to my knowledge.

    Katy's might be able to give you ingredients to make a dipping sauce. Mostly you need soy, vinegar, and some kind of chili paste with garlic (I prefer that to chili oil for this application). I would think they would have these. Also good to have sesame oil, scallions, maybe some fresh garlic (somewhat atypical). Not sure if they would have these available for you.

    As I mentioned, I think of guo tie and shui jiao as somewhat distinct. The picture of the guo tie above doesn't "look right" to me. See, e.g., the photo below, which I found from searching on Flickr (I didn't post the image as it's not my photo and copyright is reserved, assume it is ok to link) to illustrate differences. But I will grant that there are almost certainly regions of China where the guo tie pictured from Katy's is typical.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/48009623@N00/158551877/
  • Post #283 - October 6th, 2008, 8:59 pm
    Post #283 - October 6th, 2008, 8:59 pm Post #283 - October 6th, 2008, 8:59 pm
    I was at Katy’s this weekend and they have at least two new menu items. They are written on a sign the wall (not in English) below the original menu. One of the items is called “so ja bin” and looks like a giant Malaysian roti chanai. I’m not sure that that is the correct pronunciation, but that’s what I got from Katy (please correct me if you know the actual word). I saw two tables receive it and I would have ordered it also if not for the two bowls of soup, szechuan noodles and dumplings in front of us (for only 2 people). It looked unbelievably delicious and I can’t wait to go back and try it. It was heaped on the plate and the top was a crispy golden brown and the inside was layered, not quite flaky, thin bread. I'm not sure what the other item was, but I will ask before ordering next time!
  • Post #284 - November 5th, 2008, 8:50 am
    Post #284 - November 5th, 2008, 8:50 am Post #284 - November 5th, 2008, 8:50 am
    How crowded does this place get around the weekday lunch rush? Am I better off aiming for an off hour visit?
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #285 - November 5th, 2008, 9:01 am
    Post #285 - November 5th, 2008, 9:01 am Post #285 - November 5th, 2008, 9:01 am
    Most of the times I have been there, the answer would be yes.

    D.
  • Post #286 - November 5th, 2008, 9:04 am
    Post #286 - November 5th, 2008, 9:04 am Post #286 - November 5th, 2008, 9:04 am
    Dave148 wrote:How crowded does this place get around the weekday lunch rush? Am I better off aiming for an off hour visit?


    I ahve had luck getting in just before 12:00, after that it fills up pretty quick.
  • Post #287 - November 5th, 2008, 9:28 am
    Post #287 - November 5th, 2008, 9:28 am Post #287 - November 5th, 2008, 9:28 am
    Thanks guys.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #288 - November 5th, 2008, 6:28 pm
    Post #288 - November 5th, 2008, 6:28 pm Post #288 - November 5th, 2008, 6:28 pm
    Image

    Image

    Image
  • Post #289 - November 5th, 2008, 7:24 pm
    Post #289 - November 5th, 2008, 7:24 pm Post #289 - November 5th, 2008, 7:24 pm
    ^ ^ ^
    Anyone care to translate?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #290 - November 5th, 2008, 7:36 pm
    Post #290 - November 5th, 2008, 7:36 pm Post #290 - November 5th, 2008, 7:36 pm
    Jay K, how odd, I have almost the exact same picture.

    Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #291 - November 6th, 2008, 3:47 pm
    Post #291 - November 6th, 2008, 3:47 pm Post #291 - November 6th, 2008, 3:47 pm
    Stopped by today at the uneventful dining time of 1:30. I was the only customer. Had the wonton soup and it hit the spot. Lunch made up for the crummy driving weather today. Sadly, nobody was napping there to keep me company.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #292 - November 6th, 2008, 4:04 pm
    Post #292 - November 6th, 2008, 4:04 pm Post #292 - November 6th, 2008, 4:04 pm
    There has to be a good story behind Mr. Red Shirt's pinky ring.
  • Post #293 - November 16th, 2008, 9:51 pm
    Post #293 - November 16th, 2008, 9:51 pm Post #293 - November 16th, 2008, 9:51 pm
    Added another notch to my GNR belt (I'm sure I'm mixing my metaphors, but it works) at Katy's on Saturday (after returning to the west burb Lao Sze Chuan on Friday -- they weren't at the top of their game, but still wonderful).

    I'd called early in the day saying there would be 15 of us, and between the noise where I was, the noise at the other end and the language barrier, I'm not sure I was understood or believed. When we got there (only 12 of us as it turned out), the place was pretty packed. With a tight time limit for a couple of people, and a small child that doesn't eat food that touches other food, more than half the party went around the center for Thai (they liked it), leaving five of us to enjoy the fresh noodly goodness.

    We ordered the Pancake with Pork, Fried Noodles with Beef, Dan Dan Noodles, Ma Po Tofu (veg), a veg fried rice and pot stickers. They were very accomodating of meat-free requests, thankfully. The pot stickers were great in texture, but the filling was somewhat watery. The highlights were the Pancake and Dan Dan, with the Fried Noodles a close third. A fair amount of the Ma Po came home. It was tasty and spicy, but not the best example.

    Service is friendly and fast and the prices are low. Definitely worth hitting when you're in the neighborhood -- just don't bring a crowd, it's very small.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #294 - November 20th, 2008, 4:34 pm
    Post #294 - November 20th, 2008, 4:34 pm Post #294 - November 20th, 2008, 4:34 pm
    I did stop by for a late lunch last week - the rainy day special, I guess, pot stickers and Dan Dan Noodles. They were working on a new menu that I was proudly shown (lots more Ameri-Cantonese standards :( ) with pretty pictures.

    Having completed that wearying task, the host then kept me company by napping at the adjoining table. All was right in the world.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #295 - November 20th, 2008, 5:40 pm
    Post #295 - November 20th, 2008, 5:40 pm Post #295 - November 20th, 2008, 5:40 pm
    Had a stellar lunch there today. One of the best meals of the year for me. Pickles, spicy noodles, pancake w/pork, pot stickers (very juicy, not watery @ all, almost soup dumplingesque). I'm still smiling.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #296 - November 22nd, 2008, 12:55 pm
    Post #296 - November 22nd, 2008, 12:55 pm Post #296 - November 22nd, 2008, 12:55 pm
    I made the trek out from the city to finally try this LTH favorite and I'm glad I did. I expected the place to be packed full on a Saturday at 11:15 (just like all the good dim sum places are in Chinatown), but I was the first customer of the day. Service was very friendly, and the food was fabulous.

    I had the Dan Dan Mein (the noodles are as good as touted) and potstickers (as well done as any in Chicago). Then I took home some pickles, spicy beef tendon, and bao (all of which I tried as soon as I got home and really loved, especially the pickles).

    As much as the suburbs give me the willies, I'll be back! ;)
  • Post #297 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:18 am
    Post #297 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:18 am Post #297 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:18 am
    Could anyone translate the new menu items posted above? Thanks.
  • Post #298 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:29 am
    Post #298 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:29 am Post #298 - December 23rd, 2008, 9:29 am
    jow wrote:Could anyone translate the new menu items posted above? Thanks.


    They have a new menu in English.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #299 - December 23rd, 2008, 2:38 pm
    Post #299 - December 23rd, 2008, 2:38 pm Post #299 - December 23rd, 2008, 2:38 pm
    What the heck, let me repeat - I work about 10 minutes from Katy's so if anyone is out this way for lunch or an early dinner, feel free to PM me if you would like company. I cannot always come, but I will try.

    No, Alan, this is not aimed specifically at you :wink: .
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #300 - December 24th, 2008, 10:50 am
    Post #300 - December 24th, 2008, 10:50 am Post #300 - December 24th, 2008, 10:50 am
    dicksond wrote:What the heck, let me repeat - I work about 10 minutes from Katy's so if anyone is out this way for lunch or an early dinner, feel free to PM me if you would like company. I cannot always come, but I will try.

    No, Alan, this is not aimed specifically at you :wink: .


    I have have missed that tidbit of info(I work about 15 mis away myself), the next time I head over to Katy's I will let you know.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more