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Chicago Hot Dogs for Tourists

Chicago Hot Dogs for Tourists
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  • Post #61 - May 11th, 2008, 2:14 am
    Post #61 - May 11th, 2008, 2:14 am Post #61 - May 11th, 2008, 2:14 am
    Like many other chilies, sport peppers are a specific cultivar of Capsicum annuum.
    Tomato Growers Supply Co. wrote:This Capsicum annum type of pepper is popular for its use as a pickled pepper to go on hot dogs and other sandwiches. It is especially well known as an essential condiment in a Chicago-style hot dog. Peppers resemble Tabasco peppers, but the Sport pepper is larger, about 1-1/2 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. They are medium-hot and produced in great abundance on sturdy plants.

    Image
    Last edited by LAZ on April 15th, 2012, 9:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #62 - May 12th, 2008, 3:22 pm
    Post #62 - May 12th, 2008, 3:22 pm Post #62 - May 12th, 2008, 3:22 pm
    JoelF wrote:If I can't get the neon relish, I'll order a beef, a Polish, an Italian...


    That's makes you the most fastidious hot dog eater in Chicagoland!!

    The neocon ( I mean Neon) relish is just food-coloring, so isn't the difference tasteless? I appreciate your quest for the totally perfect dog. They are indeed hard to find right here in Chicagoland.
  • Post #63 - May 12th, 2008, 5:57 pm
    Post #63 - May 12th, 2008, 5:57 pm Post #63 - May 12th, 2008, 5:57 pm
    Gert wrote:
    JoelF wrote:If I can't get the neon relish, I'll order a beef, a Polish, an Italian...


    That's makes you the most fastidious hot dog eater in Chicagoland!!

    The neocon ( I mean Neon) relish is just food-coloring, so isn't the difference tasteless? I appreciate your quest for the totally perfect dog. They are indeed hard to find right here in Chicagoland.


    The ingredients in CHIPICO (Neon Green Vienna Beef) relish are: cucumbers, water, vinegar, high frutose corn syrup, sugar, salt spices, red peppers, and tumeric. This combination creates a distinctive sweet taste that is unlike any retail hot dog relish, such as Heinz. The tasteless neon green color was the invention of Abe Drexler, owner of Fluky's.
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef
  • Post #64 - May 12th, 2008, 6:21 pm
    Post #64 - May 12th, 2008, 6:21 pm Post #64 - May 12th, 2008, 6:21 pm
    Mmmm, love that HFCS. Hey, what kind of coloring agent is used to give it that unearthly color?
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #65 - May 12th, 2008, 8:20 pm
    Post #65 - May 12th, 2008, 8:20 pm Post #65 - May 12th, 2008, 8:20 pm
    Cogito wrote:Mmmm, love that HFCS. Hey, what kind of coloring agent is used to give it that unearthly color?


    Blue #1
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef
  • Post #66 - May 12th, 2008, 11:38 pm
    Post #66 - May 12th, 2008, 11:38 pm Post #66 - May 12th, 2008, 11:38 pm
    Image

    Stranger in a strange land, and a hungry one at that, inspired by this thread. So I says to the guy at "Top Dog" at the good old Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis - a perfect, sterile 70 degrees as always - give me one hot dog. What toppings, says he. Whatever's local, says I. Give it to me how the masses take it.

    $5.75 later, I have this. A 1/4 pound "Black Angus Beef" dog, steamed to mush with no casing, tasting like so many chicken and pork Oscar Meyers of my childhood, on a pillow-soft sesame seed white bun. Topped with:

    -ketchup
    -grilled onions
    -pickle
    -celery salt
    -ginormous high-rain Mexican sport peppers brined in isopropyl alcohol

    I note that at least the first three toppings (ketch', grilled, pick) are the standard at Lambeau as well, and here at Kroll's on burgers, hearkening back to that elusive 30's-style sandwich. Not Chicago, but not bad by any means if well executed. This particular dog was a heartbreaking mix of great (perfect grilled onions, pickle, salt) and base (dog, bun, peppers). At least the Twins brought the good wood.
  • Post #67 - May 13th, 2008, 12:10 am
    Post #67 - May 13th, 2008, 12:10 am Post #67 - May 13th, 2008, 12:10 am
    chicagostyledog wrote:The tasteless neon green color was the invention of Abe Drexler, owner of Fluky's.

    What is your source for this attribution?
  • Post #68 - May 13th, 2008, 8:16 am
    Post #68 - May 13th, 2008, 8:16 am Post #68 - May 13th, 2008, 8:16 am
    LAZ wrote:
    chicagostyledog wrote:The tasteless neon green color was the invention of Abe Drexler, owner of Fluky's.

    What is your source for this attribution?


    Laz,

    I've read the Abe Drexler information on the net over the years and decided to call an expert Chicago hot dog historian who works in the industry. I discovered the neon green color was added by the manufacturers to enhance the light colors of their pickles. During this process, someone got a bit carried away and went over board on the coloration. The neon green relish was born, enhancing the colors of the other condiments used to dress a Chicago style dog.
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef
  • Post #69 - May 13th, 2008, 6:43 pm
    Post #69 - May 13th, 2008, 6:43 pm Post #69 - May 13th, 2008, 6:43 pm
    Gert wrote:
    JoelF wrote:If I can't get the neon relish, I'll order a beef, a Polish, an Italian...


    That's makes you the most fastidious hot dog eater in Chicagoland!!



    Great, I've now (5/13/2008) been outed as a food fetishist on our masthead.
    I thought that chicagostyledog's post would have revealed me as an epicure... but no, I'm a freak to be chided on the front page of the site. *sigh*

    And to be sure, my mother is much more fastidious about hot-dog eating, there's many a shop she won't even set foot in (her loss)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #70 - May 13th, 2008, 11:43 pm
    Post #70 - May 13th, 2008, 11:43 pm Post #70 - May 13th, 2008, 11:43 pm
    chicagostyledog wrote:I discovered the neon green color was added by the manufacturers to enhance the light colors of their pickles. During this process, someone got a bit carried away and went over board on the coloration.

    That's something like what I've heard. (Perhaps we know the same expert. :wink:) Also that the color change started to become popular during the pop-art era of the 1970s.

    I've heard some claimants as to who was first to make a point of using neon-green "piccalilli," but never Fluky's. Jack Drexler couldn't even recall even when Fluky's started using it, so it seemed unlikely his dad invented it.
  • Post #71 - May 14th, 2008, 2:42 pm
    Post #71 - May 14th, 2008, 2:42 pm Post #71 - May 14th, 2008, 2:42 pm
    I have to agree with the initial post on page one about the ingredients.
    Spot on.

    I'd say the best three dogs in town (all mentioned above) are Hot Doug's, Wiener's Circle, and Superdawg.

    Whenever I go to Weiner's Circle, I try to be as polite and courteous to the employees as possible.
    It really freaks them out - I think it is as shocking to them as it might be for your 90-year old bible-belt gramma to go in there at midnight on a Saturday, hearing all of the fratboys screaming nasty words at the employees, just because they can get away with it.

    I might be in a bog minority here, but I really don't care for Gene and Judes.
  • Post #72 - May 14th, 2008, 3:11 pm
    Post #72 - May 14th, 2008, 3:11 pm Post #72 - May 14th, 2008, 3:11 pm
    tikibars wrote:I'd say the best three dogs in town (all mentioned above) are Hot Doug's, Wiener's Circle, and Superdawg.


    Superdawg - agree, good dog
    Doug's - agree, good dog (although i always go for his specials)

    Wiener Circle - One of the worst hot dogs i've ever eaten and i will make sure that friends that come in from out of town never set foot in there. (Naturally, i'm about as rough around the edges as anything ever said in that place - so it has nothing to do with their famous abuse - i love shit like that.)

    It may have something to do with the fact that their dogs taste like what my grill's grates would probably taste like if i licked them, and then covered with celery salt. One of the two times that i've eaten there i was even hammered and i couldn't finish the dog. Threw it away. I really don't know what gets people about this place.

    To add to your list i would definitely put Gene and Jude's (amazing - imo the best dog around) and Jimmy's. Jimmys when on their A game is better than G&Js.

    When i have friends come in from out of town the only places that i take them for dogs is either G&Js or Jimmys - no question.

    EDIT: Also, in terms of what the OP was looking for, if it HAS to be a drag through the garden style i'd consider Portillos or the Vienna Beef Cafeteria.
  • Post #73 - May 14th, 2008, 3:16 pm
    Post #73 - May 14th, 2008, 3:16 pm Post #73 - May 14th, 2008, 3:16 pm
    tikibars wrote:Whenever I go to Weiner's Circle, I try to be as polite and courteous to the employees as possible.
    It really freaks them out - I think it is as shocking to them as it might be for your 90-year old bible-belt gramma to go in there at midnight on a Saturday, hearing all of the fratboys screaming nasty words at the employees, just because they can get away with it.


    Ive been going to wieners circle forever. The abusive language is a night time only thing and its a result of the staff yelling at the customers very loud at night when the place was also very loud as a way to get their attention.

    ex. lady taking order- "next f*ck in line!!!!, what you want you ugly looking mofo" eventually the drunk crowd started yelling back and tipping more, so its become as much a part of the place as the amazing char grilled dog's done real-deal Chicago style and the best cheese fries in the city.

    tikibars wrote:I might be in a bog minority here, but I really don't care for Gene and Judes.


    My personal preference is the "other" Chicago style, like Gene & Jude's but the fries have to be fresh cut and piled on top, I consider them a topping, as a kid I used to get my demon dog's plain and pile the fries in the middle. Now I order them with everything (mustard, chopped onion, peppers, no relish for me) and one of the best parts is the fries with the mustard and onions and some pepper juice on top. As far as the Vienna beef Chicago style, I like this type too, but find them so much better when the dog is charred as opposed to steamed. Thats why wieners circle is one of the city's top dogs.
  • Post #74 - May 18th, 2008, 11:29 am
    Post #74 - May 18th, 2008, 11:29 am Post #74 - May 18th, 2008, 11:29 am
    LAZ wrote:That's something like what I've heard. (Perhaps we know the same expert. ) Also that the color change started to become popular during the pop-art era of the 1970s.

    I've heard some claimants as to who was first to make a point of using neon-green "piccalilli," but never Fluky's. Jack Drexler couldn't even recall even when Fluky's started using it, so it seemed unlikely his dad invented it.

    Did Fluky change his story? The original How to Eat Like a Chicagoan article is no longer available online but a long quote survives on Vital Info's blog. Here's an excerpt from the old article:

    Leah A Zeldes wrote:The “banquet on a bun” had its origins in the Great Depression, when greengrocer Abe Drexler decided his 18-year-old son, local sports hero Jake “Fluky” Drexler, needed an occupation. That was in 1929, when jobs were hard to find, so Drexler converted the family’s Maxwell Street vegetable cart into a hot-dog stand, and began offering the “Depression Sandwich,” which sold for a nickel. “He built it like a vegetable cart would do it,” says Fluky’s son, Jack. (Also called Fluky, he likes to say he was “born in a bun” and is today proprietor of three North Side and suburban stands.) “It was an instant success.” The only change since 1929 has been the relish, which turned its distinctive “nuclear green” color in the 1970s. Fluky says they developed it, but he’s not too clear about why. To fit the hot dog into the psychedelic era perhaps? Still, today it’s as critical a part of the sandwich as the celery salt.
  • Post #75 - May 19th, 2008, 12:09 am
    Post #75 - May 19th, 2008, 12:09 am Post #75 - May 19th, 2008, 12:09 am
    Rene G wrote:Did Fluky change his story?

    More or less. He wasn't convincing in the first place. He couldn't say why and he couldn't pinpoint exactly when.

    A more believable claimant was able to give me the year they started using it and said that it was then called "piccalilli," but since I saw no documentary proof I'm reserving judgment. That does make sense to me, though, because traditionally sweet piccalilli has green tomatoes in it, and would therefore naturally have a brighter green hue.

    One correction to that obsolete article: Jack Drexler's father was Abe. Jake was his grandfather.
  • Post #76 - May 30th, 2008, 2:26 pm
    Post #76 - May 30th, 2008, 2:26 pm Post #76 - May 30th, 2008, 2:26 pm
    LAZ wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Did Fluky change his story?

    More or less. He wasn't convincing in the first place. He couldn't say why and he couldn't pinpoint exactly when.

    Thanks for the clarification. I'd been skeptical of Fluky's claim since the first time I read it.

    LAZ wrote:I don't care what kind of hot dog anybody grew up with. I don't care what kind of hot dog anybody likes better. For the purposes of this discussion, all I want to know is where to find this kind:

    Image

    Did anyone notice that Vienna's picture and descriptions don't quite match? What's labeled a pickle spear isn't long and pointed (it looks like a slice to me) and the "neon relish" appears to be normal green relish (maybe my monitor needs adjustment). It seems to me if Vienna wants to define the standard they should be a little more careful about it.

    Dmnkly wrote:But I believe you're correct about Gold Coast Dogs being a strict adherent of the Vienna/Royko standard.

    Yes, but unfortunately these days Gold Coast doesn't adhere to their own standard. According to a framed picture on the wall of the N Wabash store, a Gold Coast Dog is "top[ped] with three slices of tomato" and "sprinkle[d] with celery salt."

    Image

    The one I had recently had a single slice (no big deal, it was a lousy tomato) and no celery salt (I think they simply forgot).

    Image

    More distressing was the pile of 6 or 8 of pre-grilled hot dogs waiting for unfortunate customers (it wasn't very busy). But it wasn't a bad dog and they have bright green relish plus a tourist-friendly location (not to mention tourist prices—$2.64 for a dog).

    LAZ wrote:Gold Coast Dog locations include O'Hare, Midway, Union Station, 159 N. Wabash Ave. and 17 S. Wabash Ave.

    Anyone know how these places are related? A GCD website lists only the N Wabash location. The hot dogs at the two Wabash locations are very different. The one at 17 S Wabash served me the most miserable hot dog I've had in a long time: a mushy skinless wiener on a hard, stale bun. They should be embarrassed to serve such crap. Here's a picture of it before it went into the trash.

    Image

    I hadn't tried any of these downtown places for years so I soldiered on. I always want to hate Portillo's (that Disneyland interior puts me off my feed) but I have to admit they put out a damn good hot dog, by far the best of those I tried recently.

    Image

    Image

    They don't use neon relish (makes little difference to me) but the rest of it is by the book. Most importantly it tasted really good.

    One other place worth considering, if only for its tourist-friendly location, is Downtown Dogs. The condiments are "right" but hardly redeem the mediocre skinless dog.

    Image

    Image

    Cute interior though, with nearly every surface covered by dog snapshots and a video monitor showing famous canines (yes, Toto too).

    Gold Coast Dogs
    159 N Wabash Av
    Chicago
    312-917-1677

    Gold Coast Dogs
    17 S Wabash Av
    Chicago
    312-578-1133

    Portillo's
    100 W Ontario St
    Chicago
    312-587-8910

    Downtown Dogs
    804 N Rush St
    Chicago
    312-951-5141
  • Post #77 - May 30th, 2008, 2:41 pm
    Post #77 - May 30th, 2008, 2:41 pm Post #77 - May 30th, 2008, 2:41 pm
    Right on, Rene. Great research, and thanks for sharing your primary sources with us via some excellent photographs. I, too, really enjoy the consistency of Portillo's dogs. I've never had a stale bun or less than a very snappy hot dog; the variation comes in the toppings, as you've pointed out. But I'm not stuck on canon.
  • Post #78 - May 30th, 2008, 5:02 pm
    Post #78 - May 30th, 2008, 5:02 pm Post #78 - May 30th, 2008, 5:02 pm
    I'm still having a problem with the Vienna marketed toppings being declared the standard hot dog toppings. Perhaps they are for the so-called "tourist dog", I won't argue that. In fact, I do agree that they are a standard; perhaps an "enhanced standard". From now on, I'll be referring to hot dog toppings in all posts as follows:

    "Standard Minimalist" Chicago Hot Dog Toppings
    Mustard
    Onion
    Relish
    Sport Pepper
    Pickle (Sometimes)

    "Standard Enhanced" Chicago Hot Dog Toppings
    Mustard
    Onion
    Neon Relish
    Tomato
    Sport Pepper
    Pickle
    Celery Salt (Usually)
    Poppy Seed Bun (Most of the time)

    You'll notice that there is a bit of wiggle room when it comes to pickles in the standard minimalist definition and for celery salt and the poppy seed requirement in the standard enhanced definition. Those seem to be the major areas where there most often is variation from the Platonic ideal. For the sake of standards (pun intended), I invite others to join me in referring to dog toppings in this way.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #79 - May 30th, 2008, 5:42 pm
    Post #79 - May 30th, 2008, 5:42 pm Post #79 - May 30th, 2008, 5:42 pm
    Steve,

    I think you could also add the "Double-enhanced" version which would include such things as lettuce, green pepper, and cucumber--toppings that are not available everywhere, but are certainly not out of the question when regarding the history of Chicago dogs.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #80 - May 30th, 2008, 6:38 pm
    Post #80 - May 30th, 2008, 6:38 pm Post #80 - May 30th, 2008, 6:38 pm
    eatchicago wrote:Steve,

    I think you could also add the "Double-enhanced" version which would include such things as lettuce, green pepper, and cucumber--toppings that are not available everywhere, but are certainly not out of the question when regarding the history of Chicago dogs.

    Best,
    Michael


    It's true that those things are randomly available, but I don't think that anyone would define them as part of any so-called "standard".
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #81 - May 30th, 2008, 7:38 pm
    Post #81 - May 30th, 2008, 7:38 pm Post #81 - May 30th, 2008, 7:38 pm
    stevez wrote:It's true that those things are randomly available, but I don't think that anyone would define them as part of any so-called "standard".

    Professors Bowen and Fay do just that in their book, Hot Dog Chicago: A Native's Dining Guide (Chicago Review Press, 1983, pp 1-2): "The extravagant 'garden on a bun' Chicago school of hot dog thought specifies the addition of lettuce, cucumber slices and pieces of green pepper." I'm with you (I suspect) in being thankful the GOAB style isn't more common.
  • Post #82 - May 31st, 2008, 9:00 am
    Post #82 - May 31st, 2008, 9:00 am Post #82 - May 31st, 2008, 9:00 am
    Green pepper? :shock:

    Who does this? The only place I could think of off the top of my head that goes beyond the "standard enhanced" is Byron's. And they don't do green pepper, do they?
  • Post #83 - May 31st, 2008, 9:03 am
    Post #83 - May 31st, 2008, 9:03 am Post #83 - May 31st, 2008, 9:03 am
    Binko wrote:Green pepper? :shock:

    Who does this? The only place I could think of off the top of my head that goes beyond the "standard enhanced" is Byron's. And they don't do green pepper, do they?


    Murphy's on Belmont probably has them. They've got so much crap in their "garden" it wouldn't surprise me if they even included sprouts.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #84 - May 31st, 2008, 9:49 am
    Post #84 - May 31st, 2008, 9:49 am Post #84 - May 31st, 2008, 9:49 am
    Murphy's immediately comes to mind. The (now gone) Franksville in Evanston included lettuce and gp as well.
  • Post #85 - May 31st, 2008, 10:47 am
    Post #85 - May 31st, 2008, 10:47 am Post #85 - May 31st, 2008, 10:47 am
    eatchicago wrote:Murphy's immediately comes to mind. The (now gone) Franksville in Evanston included lettuce and gp as well.


    There's still a Franksville on Harlem and Addison. I wonder if....no, actually I don't.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #86 - May 31st, 2008, 7:41 pm
    Post #86 - May 31st, 2008, 7:41 pm Post #86 - May 31st, 2008, 7:41 pm
    stevez wrote:I'm still having a problem with the Vienna marketed toppings being declared the standard hot dog toppings. Perhaps they are for the so-called "tourist dog", I won't argue that. In fact, I do agree that they are a standard; perhaps an "enhanced standard". From now on, I'll be referring to hot dog toppings in all posts as follows:

    "Standard Minimalist" Chicago Hot Dog Toppings
    Mustard
    Onion
    Relish
    Sport Pepper
    Pickle (Sometimes)

    "Standard Enhanced" Chicago Hot Dog Toppings
    Mustard
    [Onion
    Neon Relish
    Tomato
    Sport Pepper
    Pickle
    Celery Salt (Usually)
    Poppy Seed Bun (Most of the time)

    You'll notice that there is a bit of wiggle room when it comes to pickles in the standard minimalist definition and for celery salt and the poppy seed requirement in the standard enhanced definition. Those seem to be the major areas where there most often is variation from the Platonic ideal. For the sake of standards (pun intended), I invite others to join me in referring to dog toppings in this way.


    While in Chicago, I never paid much attention to the exact specs of my dog (though I would expect celery salt and neon relish on my dog, mustard and no k obviously) - under the assumption that a dog in Chicago is a Chicago Dog...
    (The celery salt though I didn't get at many places - like at O'Hare, one place I thought should be doing it right :evil: )

    Anyways, away now, I guess I'm paying more attention. I think it is quite instructive to see what is classified as "Chicago style dog" in other cities (much the same as BBQ)

    From the Menu at D's 6 pax and dogs /click for larger view/
    Image

    Chicago Dog - 2.99
    We've loaded our Vienna all-beef hotdog with tangy yellow mustard, neon green relish, onion, tomatoes, sport peppers, a pickle spear & a dash of celery salt"


    Chicago Dog
    Image

    notice the full corners on the bun (aka poppy seeds :wink: )


    D's 6 pax and dogs
    1118 S Braddock Ave
    Pittsburgh, PA 15218
    (412) 241-4666
  • Post #87 - May 31st, 2008, 9:27 pm
    Post #87 - May 31st, 2008, 9:27 pm Post #87 - May 31st, 2008, 9:27 pm
    I hate it when they put the mustard on last. I think it should go on first. That way the onions and relish stick to the dog better, and you end up with less mustard on your lips.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #88 - June 1st, 2008, 12:58 pm
    Post #88 - June 1st, 2008, 12:58 pm Post #88 - June 1st, 2008, 12:58 pm
    Cogito wrote:I hate it when they put the mustard on last. I think it should go on first. That way the onions and relish stick to the dog better, and you end up with less mustard on your lips.


    That was my reaction to that picture, too. Put the mustard on the bun. However for pretty pictures, putting mustard on top looks very nice.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #89 - June 1st, 2008, 2:49 pm
    Post #89 - June 1st, 2008, 2:49 pm Post #89 - June 1st, 2008, 2:49 pm
    Rene G wrote:Image
    Did anyone notice that Vienna's picture and descriptions don't quite match? What's labeled a pickle spear isn't long and pointed (it looks like a slice to me) and the "neon relish" appears to be normal green relish (maybe my monitor needs adjustment). It seems to me if Vienna wants to define the standard they should be a little more careful about it.

    Thanks for your research on behalf of the tourists, Rene G.

    In defense of Vienna Beef, I'll point out that the photo/chart above doesn't come from them directly but from a hot dog stand.

    At the National Restaurant Show, Vienna not only served neon-green relish, but had no ketchup available at their booth. (There was a trick ketchup squirt bottle that shot out a piece of red string.)
  • Post #90 - June 1st, 2008, 9:35 pm
    Post #90 - June 1st, 2008, 9:35 pm Post #90 - June 1st, 2008, 9:35 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    stevez wrote:It's true that those things are randomly available, but I don't think that anyone would define them as part of any so-called "standard".

    Professors Bowen and Fay do just that in their book, Hot Dog Chicago: A Native's Dining Guide (Chicago Review Press, 1983, pp 1-2): "The extravagant 'garden on a bun' Chicago school of hot dog thought specifies the addition of lettuce, cucumber slices and pieces of green pepper." I'm with you (I suspect) in being thankful the GOAB style isn't more common.


    The Chicago style hot dog defined by Rich Bowen and Dick Fay:

    "A great dog on a perfect bun is a start, but what makes a Chicago dog totally unique is the "everything" that it comes with. Of course a Chicago hot dog has mustard, relish, and chopped onion-these are staples in much of America. But a basic hot dog also comes with a pickle spear, tomato slices, hot sport peppers, and a sprinkling of celery salt."
    -Rich Bowen & Dick Fay

    I met Rich and Dick in 1983 and was rewarded with an autographed copy of their book.
    Last edited by chicagostyledog on June 2nd, 2008, 5:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef

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