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Tenuta's in Kenosha

Tenuta's in Kenosha
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  • Tenuta's in Kenosha

    Post #1 - September 24th, 2004, 6:45 pm
    Post #1 - September 24th, 2004, 6:45 pm Post #1 - September 24th, 2004, 6:45 pm
    I saw it mentioned on the roadfood site.I searched LTH and saw a brief mention.Next time I am out that way is it worth stopping by to dine in or is it strictly take away?Thanks in advance.
  • Post #2 - September 30th, 2004, 6:05 pm
    Post #2 - September 30th, 2004, 6:05 pm Post #2 - September 30th, 2004, 6:05 pm
    So has anyone been there?Help a hungry girl out please!
  • Post #3 - October 4th, 2004, 7:58 am
    Post #3 - October 4th, 2004, 7:58 am Post #3 - October 4th, 2004, 7:58 am
    hattyn wrote:Next time I am out that way is it worth stopping by to dine in or is it strictly take away?Thanks in advance.

    Hattyn,

    I've never been to Tenuta's in Kenosha, but it's high on my list of places to visit. I believe Tenuta's is take away only.

    While I have not been to Tenuta's Italian deli in Kenosha I have had their Hot Giardiniera, which is available at Woodman's in Kenosha. The Hot Giardiniera was recommended by none other than Joe H author of one of my favorite chowhound posts, "Unquestionably The Absolute Best In America."

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Tenuta's
    3203 52nd Street
    Kenosha, WI 53144
    262-657-9001
    http://www.tenutasdeli.com

    Woodman's Food Market Inc
    7145 120th Ave
    Kenosha, WI 53142
    262-857-3801
  • Post #4 - October 4th, 2004, 8:03 am
    Post #4 - October 4th, 2004, 8:03 am Post #4 - October 4th, 2004, 8:03 am
    Thanks.I have been to Woodman's.Next time I am there I'll take a look for it.
  • Post #5 - November 15th, 2004, 10:44 am
    Post #5 - November 15th, 2004, 10:44 am Post #5 - November 15th, 2004, 10:44 am
    Tenuta's,Kenosha

    My good friend, Pat, who passed away this summer, was a native of Kenosha ; it was he who introduced me to Tenuta's and over the past few years I've shopped there a few times.

    Tenuta's is really quite an impressive store, indeed, it is more like two or three stores in one. First, as a salumeria, it has an impressive array of Italian deli offerings: cheeses, salume, fresh sausages, prepared salads, olives. And the Italian grocery offererings are more extensive than one can find in any of the Chicagoland salumeria; their selections of dry pasta, olive oil, vinegar, spices, canned goods etc. etc. are on a scale that surpasses, I believe, even those of the Chicagoland Italian grocery I visit on occasion, Caputo's (Harlem Ave.).

    In addition to the very extensive food offerings, Tenuta's also offers a great selection of beers at good prices (domestic, German, Czech, Polish, Dutch, Italian -- no Belgian beers though) and they also have a fairly large wine department. Many or most of the wines are offered at 2-for-the price-of-one deals, with the basic price a bit high for one but really a pretty darn good bargain for two, at least when compared with the prices I see for the same wines down here in the big burgh.

    Here are some random further notes on particular strengths and weaknesses of Tenuta's:

    1) the selection of dried pasta is magnificent; just about every shape made is available, most in multiple brands. The prices are not bad but not particularly low either. I think, though, that they usually have some good stuff on sale.

    2) their prepared salads and such, e.g., giardiniera, are reputed to be very good. I would personally say that their hot-pepper spread is 'kick-ass' and very tasty.

    3) The house bread ('Tenuta's) I find weird: very crisp crust but the interior has a character more like Wonder Bread than I can handle. The other local bakeries (and Chicagoland, e.g. Gonnella) whose goods are sold at their deli counter all pale compared to the better stuff one can find around here (D'Amato's, Ferrara's, Masi's).

    4) Of their home-made pasta, I've tried two sorts. I've had their jumbo cheese ravioli (which I served with a simple tomato and basil sauce) and I will not make a point of getting them again. They were overstuffed (and thus prone to breaking), the dough was too thick and tough (presumably on account of the breakage problem), and the ricotta filling was too salty and was flavoured with garlic, which is to my mind anathema. I won't say they're bad, but I wasn't fond of them and can purchase ravioli that please me more elsewhere.

    On the otherhand, I also got some frozen cavetelli at Tenuta's and I thought they were really quite good.

    5) The olive oil selction is fun; they offer a number of brands which one rarely or never sees in the shops here in Chicago. The last time I was there I got a reasonably priced bottle of San Giuliano, an oil from the town of Alghero, the Catalan enclave on the northwest coast of Sardinia.

    If you are an inveterate visitor of Italian stores, Tenuta's is a must; it's a fun store to poke around and you will surely find interesting things to eat and drink. The wine and beer deals are pretty attractive too. On the other hand, the collective offerings of Chicago's Italian stores are not surpassed by the Kenosha institution. If you're up that way, stop in; if you're passing by and really like Italian stuff, get off the highway and check it out.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #6 - November 15th, 2004, 11:57 am
    Post #6 - November 15th, 2004, 11:57 am Post #6 - November 15th, 2004, 11:57 am
    We ended up in Kenosha yesterday.I did not know until we were well on our way we were headed there.Oh well,next time.
  • Post #7 - November 15th, 2004, 12:20 pm
    Post #7 - November 15th, 2004, 12:20 pm Post #7 - November 15th, 2004, 12:20 pm
    Addendum to above post on Tenuta's:

    Tenuta's also operates a sausage and 'hot beef' (=Italian beef, more or less) stand, so one can get a quick a snack to tide one over for the hour-plus trip back to Chicago.

    There is another old Italian store in Kenosha that my friend Pat recommended to me very highly (and over Tenuta's) for their home-made ravioli. I tried going there once but caught them on their day of rest. I'll try again soon, combining the trip to Chenoscia italiana perhaps with a visit to the scenic land of the Luxembourgeois up at Belgium, Lake Church and Harrington State Park. Wisconsin is a great state...

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #8 - November 15th, 2004, 1:38 pm
    Post #8 - November 15th, 2004, 1:38 pm Post #8 - November 15th, 2004, 1:38 pm
    Sounds like I'll eb in Kenosha over the weekend (g).
  • Post #9 - November 16th, 2004, 10:53 am
    Post #9 - November 16th, 2004, 10:53 am Post #9 - November 16th, 2004, 10:53 am
    I don't know Kenosha except for what I saw on election day, but for our lunch break my husband and I discovered a great local diner, the real authentic variety, that had wonderful homemade food (great soup) and fantastic pies, made by the owner's mom. It's called Andy's, located at 2301-63rd Street, phone 654-7770. It's been a family establishment for a long time, and they have a drive-in elsewhere in Kenosha. We were told that the best day to come for pies is Friday, when they have some 17 varieties available, including banana cream, coconut cream, rhubarb cream, and etc, and all the fruit pies you might want. We honestly thought it might be worth the drive up there to get some whole pies to take home, which you can do with a day's notice. Perhaps regular visitors to Kenosha know the place, but if any pie lovers are passing through, this is the place for you!
    ToniG
  • Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 9:59 am
    Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 9:59 am Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 9:59 am
    Hi,

    I was at Woodmans a few week's ago.

    They sell Tenuta's gardinera there, which is reputed to be very good. They sell it in a variety of sizes including a one gallon size for less than $15. One gallon is 8 pints, which people could share or feed a crowd.

    FYI - I buy the large tins of hoison sauce and divide it up with a friend or two.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 10:39 am
    Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 10:39 am Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 10:39 am
    ToniG wrote:I don't know Kenosha except for ...


    Thanks for the tip on Andy's...

    I can't claim to know very much about Kenosha but having poked around there a few times, I have taken a real liking to the place and intend to go back and explore some more.

    There's one restaurant I visited there (with Amata, Lucantonius and some friends from Printers' Row -- hey John, you lurking out there?) after my friend's wake. I can't remember if I wrote anything about this place here (I just searched extensively and it seems I didn't) and so will keep my comments brief.

    The name of the place is the Italian-American Club. It's on 52nd, about half or three quarters of a mile to the east of Tenuta's. I knew of the place again from my friend Pat, who had fond memories of eating there as a kid but no nostalgic illusions about the quality of the food served there in more recent years, after the retiement of the old guard. The name of the place is extremely apt: it's archetypically Italian-American... I got one of their signiture dishes, a "Sicilian pork-chop", which was, if I remember correctly, a breaded pork-chop smothered in a garlicky tomato sauce. Alongside came some pre-cooked, pale and tired pasta, also dressed with the same red sauce. It was what it was and as such, neither surprised nor delighted nor disappointed. I was curious to see this old Kenosha institution that my friend had told me of and it was a really interesting place to visit. The folks who work there are very friendly and the building was something to see.

    A further note on Kenosha: it has a beautiful lake front. If you're up there, make a point of travelling along the lake and stopping in one or the other of the nice parks they have on the lake to the south of the harbour.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 11:10 am
    Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 11:10 am Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 11:10 am
    The atmosphere at Kenosha's Italian-American Club reminded me of a Finnish restaurant I once visited in Thunder Bay, Ontario, which is to say large basement room, nearly no "decor", fluorescent lights, overall time warpy feeling. (In Thunder Bay I had actually called ahead to try to make a reservation; upon arrival I understood how laughably insane that was.) The Italian American club was perhaps a step up in that one doesn't sit at long communal tables, nor is fries-with-gravy an omnipresent side dish. :)
  • Post #13 - March 19th, 2006, 11:31 am
    Post #13 - March 19th, 2006, 11:31 am Post #13 - March 19th, 2006, 11:31 am
    Image

    The first time I had heard of Tenuta's was on the other board by a poster who originates in Washington, D.C. He would occasionally go to Woodman's to buy Tenuta's gardinera and Ol'Salty's potato chips from Rockford, IL. I had heard of neither product until his post. In fact, I thought until I got home yesterday, I might be the first to report on a physical visit to Tenuta's. Fortunately, Amata and Antonius did the heavy lifting sometime ago. All their impressions I wholly support, because it is a terrific Italian store with tremendous variety.

    Yesterday I was up in Kenosha for lunch, then to visit Southern Foods and Ruffolo's International Foods. While I was Ruffolo's, I remembered never having been to Tenuta's. My impression from Ruffolo's ladies was Tenuta's is mainly a liquor store with some food sold. They counter ladies provided directions, then commented Tenuta's makes a great muffaletta sandwich. The first thing I encountered at Tenuta's was this sign:

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    I then turned the corner to find concrete benches and tables waiting for warmer weather to find guests. In a few weeks, they will be opening their outdoor food concession stands offering hot paninis:

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    If that is not intriguing, they offer sausage sandwiches where they made quality selections for each variety offered:

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    I admit to being terribly curious about their sausage sandwiches when their condiments include eggplant! "Yes sir, I want my sausage sandwich loaded and heavy on the eggplant," just sings in my head!

    In my merry chase for the muffaletta, I bumped into the cheeses first. I especially liked Tenuta's really large lettering along with serving suggestions:

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    Since buffalo milk cheese is a re-occuring topic, I bought a ball of fresh buffalo milk cheese mozarella imported from Italy for $6.99 and a pound of this:

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    The caciotta didn't offer any serving suggestions, so I inquired with a young counter guy who hunted up a senior manager. He suggested this could be eaten as-is with wine or grate some on a salad.

    Yesterday I overheard people gasping with surprise at the cheeses, making comments they found more at Tenuta's than at Caputo's. Since I rarely go to Caputo's I could not begin to make comparisons. Of course, I am more into size than variety, so I was impressed by this cheese, which incidently gives you some impression on the sausage counter:

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    I also picked up a small piece of the muffa-lotta sandwich, which was more a variant of a muffaletta than a faithful rendition. Muffalettas are pressed which helps meld the filling. Otherwise lacking the last step, this was quite a good sandwich:

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    In my search for a lemonata to go with this sandwich, I found the wall of olive oils Antonius referred to:

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    This picture only captured two racks, there was at least one more. A similar two racks further down the aisle had Tenuta's gardineras in all varieties as well as eggplant salad, hot pepper relish and muffaletta olive salads in all container sizes. I inquired with the check-out girl if all these gardineras were made in-house. She indicated they are made to their recipes and specifications by outside vendors. In fact, there is a lot of Tenuta's food offerings are private labeled. Not everything, of course, though quite a bit.

    They also offered quite a range of anchovies and sardines in sometimes surprisingly large quantities: one pound jars of anchovie paste , anchovies packed in oil and those packed in salt. The prices were very reasonable for these quantities, though you might need several people to share in this purchase from a consumption point of view.

    By the checkout counter, they were selling spare gaskets for expresso machines as well as a variety of disks for grinding meat. If you needed either, I could arrive with your original from home for comparison.

    I feel I am in Evil Ronnie's shoes, because I came in to just look around and sample a sandwich. Fifty dollars later with a few pounds of cheese, some pasta and a few other things to show for my efforts. I finally left Tenuta's very impressed and looking forward to a return visit.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - March 19th, 2006, 7:49 pm
    Post #14 - March 19th, 2006, 7:49 pm Post #14 - March 19th, 2006, 7:49 pm
    Cathy,

    Did you happen to notice any ventresca tuna, perhaps in large cans or in glass jars?
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #15 - March 19th, 2006, 7:57 pm
    Post #15 - March 19th, 2006, 7:57 pm Post #15 - March 19th, 2006, 7:57 pm
    Josephine,

    I cannot say I saw them, but then again I wasn't looking for them. I encourage you to call them. From the breadth of products Italian there, I can estimate they have it but it is just too far to go on an estimate!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - March 20th, 2006, 9:00 am
    Post #16 - March 20th, 2006, 9:00 am Post #16 - March 20th, 2006, 9:00 am
    A few thoughts on Tenutas....

    Look for the smoked mozzerella, its a real treat. Its in the big cheese case, not deli.

    Good buys on bulk cheese - cheddar, mozzerella, etc.

    Watch for out of date products. They have huge variety, but dont seem to check the sheles for expired products. This includes their beer.

    Always check the beer specials, occasionally they get some amazing values.

    There are two areas for wine - the front has their regular selection. The back of the store has their red dot "two for one" wines. I believe these are largely dstributor close outs. Sometimes a fantastic bargain can be found....but of you find something you like , run back immediately to pick up a case as they do turn these wines quickly.
    Last edited by fishie on March 20th, 2006, 9:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #17 - March 20th, 2006, 9:02 am
    Post #17 - March 20th, 2006, 9:02 am Post #17 - March 20th, 2006, 9:02 am
    Cathy,

    Nice post and pics (as I write this, some of the ones further on in the post aren't coming through). I'm glad you got there and liked it; it is an amazing store.

    I've never had the chance to get a sausage sandwich at the warm-weather stand they set up -- it's always been out of season that we've been there or, when it has been open, it wasn't time for us to eat. But I've heard the sandwiches are very good.

    As I said in my earlier post, almost everything that you can find at Tenuta's can be found at one or another of the Italian stores in Chicago or the western suburbs but there's no place that I know that comes close to offering the broad selection of so many items. The photo of the olive oil section you posted should give folks a good idea whereof I speak and the pasta aisle is -- dare I say it -- breath-taking. I also like the two-for-one wine offerings.

    Viva Tenuta's, viva Chenoscia!

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #18 - March 25th, 2006, 7:35 am
    Post #18 - March 25th, 2006, 7:35 am Post #18 - March 25th, 2006, 7:35 am
    I get up to Kenosha anywhere from 5 to 15 times a summer. I've been to Tenuta's and it is very good. If anyone wants to know about more places to eat/drink in or around Kenosha, drop Captain Andy a line.
    http://www.jedisportfishing.com/ (414) 788-6603. He owns a mortgage company in Kenosha and also runs a fishing charter from Simmons Island. He has great knowledge of foods and wine. His resume includes managing places like The Italian Village and Magnum's in Chicago and loves talking about food and restaurants.
    Tom
  • Post #19 - March 26th, 2006, 7:30 am
    Post #19 - March 26th, 2006, 7:30 am Post #19 - March 26th, 2006, 7:30 am
    Tenuta's will be the final stop on the "Cheesehead in Beer Town Tour" on Saturday, April 29th. I've been a regular customer of Tenuta's for the past 26 years and can vouch for it's goodness, selection, and quality of product. After our three week vacation in Italy, a visit to Tenuta's was a must. It's as authentic as it gets.
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    This was the original store. It has long been replaced by a large remodeled superstore, two parking lots, and an outdoor cafe serving brats and Vienna Beef hot dogs.
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    The soda fountain is long gone. www.tenutas.deli.com A great old fashioned soda fountain still operates in Kenosha at Jack's Cafe in Andrea's Gift & Cigar Shop. http://www.andreasgifts.com



    CSD
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef
  • Post #20 - May 22nd, 2006, 10:14 pm
    Post #20 - May 22nd, 2006, 10:14 pm Post #20 - May 22nd, 2006, 10:14 pm
    Hi,

    I stopped by Tenuta's on Sunday and never stepped inside the door. I didn't have to because their outdoor sandwich hut is open for the summer.

    For the cost of $4.99 each, a friend and I enjoyed expertly prepared panini sandwiches. My friend ordered the Pork Cutlet, which is a breaded pork cutlet, provolone cheese, sliced tomato and pesto mayonnaise. She very kindly allowed me a bite, which revealed a well seasoned pork cutlet that would put many Iowa tenderloin sandwiches back to the drawing board in search of better taste.

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    I ordered the Calabrese Sausage and Spinach panini, which consisted of grilled homemade Italian sausage, provolone cheese, minced garlic and spinach sauteed in olive oil with Italian seasonings and creamy pesto mayonnaise:

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    These sandwiches are made inside, then maybe 5 minutes later someone walks around the building calling your name until you wave them over.

    Afterwards, we visited garden centers to price plants. While driving up to Racine on Green Bay Rd, I followed signage to fresh picked asparagus at $2 per pound and rhubarb for $1.50 per pound. Later they will be selling peas for roughly $4 per pound.

    Riverwoods Produce
    2920-7th Street
    Kenosha, WI 53140
    Tel: 262-552-8830
    Daily 9 AM - 7 PM
    (hours subject to change depending on produce availability)

    We had the asparagus this evening. The 4 pounds of rhubarb will be made into a pie and the balance frozen.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #21 - May 28th, 2006, 10:45 pm
    Post #21 - May 28th, 2006, 10:45 pm Post #21 - May 28th, 2006, 10:45 pm
    Hi,

    After I had my Cuban sandwich at Andy's Diner, I drove over to Tenuta's for Bufala mozzerella. While waiting for my turn, I saw they had prosciutto tip ends sliced paper thin for $5 or $6 a pound. When I saw regular prosciutto was $14 and up, then I bought some to wrap around melon and dates on Memorial Day.

    Driving due west of WI-158 or 52nd Street, I found it was approximately 5 miles to I-94. Tenuta's is closer to I-94 than some expect, though do consult a mapping program for precise instructions.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #22 - August 30th, 2006, 9:47 am
    Post #22 - August 30th, 2006, 9:47 am Post #22 - August 30th, 2006, 9:47 am
    LTH,

    Stopped at Tenuta's for the first time a few weeks ago and echo the accolades above, Tenuta's is a terrific full featured Italian deli/store/sandwich shop.

    I was at Woodman's in Kenosha on the way back from Milwaukee and, as I was picking up my usual 3-jars of Joe H* approved Tenuta's giardiniera, I thought why not visit the actual shop. Which tuned out to be one of my better ideas. :)

    I wandered Tenuta's aisles, olive oil, pastas, interesting Italian flour, top notch deli counter, reasonably priced beer and wine, with an emphasis on Italian wine.

    Tenuta's
    Image
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    Even hand rolled cigars, which I believe Jeff B has mentioned.
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    Though the grilled sandwiches looked, and smelled, terrific.
    Image

    I opted for a custom made beauty from the inside deli.
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    Tenuta's has outside seating, perfect for a sunny summer day.
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    Along with my sandwich, I had Point Root Beef, spicy hot colossal olives and a snack size Nutella for dessert.
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    The spicy hot olives were terrific.
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    As was the sandwich packed with meats, tomato, fresh mozzarella and just the right amount of Tenuta's famous giardiniera.
    Image

    While not a must stop for those with access to Bari, Riviera, Caputo's, Joseph's and all the wonderful Italian shops in Chicago, it is one of the better, fresher, well managed, full service, friendly food emporiums I've had the pleasure to visit.

    A few additional pictures may be found here

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    http://www.tenutasdeli.com/

    *Joe H is the author of the long ago c-h post Absolute Best In America, which seems currently unavailable
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - August 30th, 2006, 10:22 am
    Post #23 - August 30th, 2006, 10:22 am Post #23 - August 30th, 2006, 10:22 am
    Glad to see you finally made it to Tenuta's! Though most everything is available in one or the other Chicago Italian shop, the concentration of things at T's is great and their prices on certain items are impossible to beat.

    I need to make a ttrip back soon...

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #24 - September 23rd, 2007, 2:55 pm
    Post #24 - September 23rd, 2007, 2:55 pm Post #24 - September 23rd, 2007, 2:55 pm
    After visiting Pleasant Prairie outlet mall yesterday I drove the short distance to Tenuta's; it was my first visit, and prompted by this thread. I grew-up at 69th & Justine St. on the Southside of Chicago and a very short walk away was an Italian neighborhood and Ambrosino's, a supermarket serving that community. Tenuta's reminded me very much of Ambrosino's and of the 50's and 60's.

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    After shopping, during which I picked-up some bread, olives, antipasta salad and a few bottles of the hard-to-find Fortissimo red wine (from California) to bring to a party in Naperville later in the evening, I stopped outside to have something to eat. I chose the homemade Italian sausage sandwich, which I thought was just okay, not something I'd order a second time. The sausage was very lightly seasoned.

    Italian Sausage Sandwich

    Image

    Thanks to those of you who've posted previously, for drawing my attention to Tenuta's.
  • Post #25 - July 31st, 2010, 10:11 am
    Post #25 - July 31st, 2010, 10:11 am Post #25 - July 31st, 2010, 10:11 am
    Antonius wrote:Tenuta's,Kenosha

    If you are an inveterate visitor of Italian stores, Tenuta's is a must; it's a fun store to poke around and you will surely find interesting things to eat and drink. The wine and beer deals are pretty attractive too. On the other hand, the collective offerings of Chicago's Italian stores are not surpassed by the Kenosha institution. If you're up that way, stop in; if you're passing by and really like Italian stuff, get off the highway and check it out.

    Antonius


    I finally made it to Tenuta's yesterday. What Antonius wrote several years ago, holds pretty darn apt. I liked the store much, but I thought it'd be a bit more destination-y. I know I am spoiled being so nearby Freddy's one way and the two Caputo's and Da Riv the other, that I am a poor judge of these things. Still, if it was written back then, how can it not be wrong today.

    That said, there were some very good things yesterday. The wine specials may actually be make the trip worth it. Many quality bottles @ 2:1 (but again, nothing approaching the steals I routinely find at Caputo's Cheese in Melrose, I am so damn spoiled). And speaking of cheese, I think to some extent the Italian style cheeses of Wisconsin are under-rated. Most of the "name" cheese people do Alpine-ish cheeses (you know, all that Swiss, German heritage), and the Italian style cheeses are made nearly all by "factories" like Bel Gioso and Sartori. That does not mean that these cheeses are not outstanding, and the Italian style cheeses can be some of very good examples of fine local cheese. And Tenuta's is a very, very good place to get these cheeses including a private branding of Sartori's award winning "savecchio" parmesan style cheese. Way more examples of Wi-Italian cheeses too.

    I'm a sucker for the "home-made" vinegar and the house California olive oil, but I have yet to try either yet.

    Tenuta's is a place I like, and if I happened to be in Kenosha, I'd probably visit, but it is not a place I would stretch too far for.

    PS
    As noted before by MikeG, the prices on New Glarus beer are awfully good too.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #26 - September 16th, 2010, 6:34 pm
    Post #26 - September 16th, 2010, 6:34 pm Post #26 - September 16th, 2010, 6:34 pm
    Never buy pre made sandwiches, not even at Tenuta's.

    Muffo-Lotta

    Image

    I like Tenuta's, like 'em a lot, so I will give them the benefit of the doubt and consider the odd spelling as clue I should have picked up this was not a traditional Muffuletta. Bread was bland, no olive salad and, in comparison to my delicious well packed made-on-the-spot sandwich upthread, light on the meat.

    Image

    Image

    Tenuta's has greatly expanded its wine department, good deals on moderately priced wine abound, and quality olive oil was substantially less than I've seen in years. Frantoia $16.49, Paesano $14.99, Colovita $14.99. All evo liters.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #27 - September 17th, 2010, 7:24 am
    Post #27 - September 17th, 2010, 7:24 am Post #27 - September 17th, 2010, 7:24 am
    I know Ralph Tenuta very well and have even eaten at the store in the private dining room in the rear for which I paid for at a charity auction for the right. Tony, his brother, is usually on the store floor and is very helpful.
    I purchase the Wisconsin cheeses by the wheel and age. Currently we are enjoying an aged Wisconsin Gorgonzola among others.
    Wines are hit or miss but when I find a good one, i purchase what they have.
    I don't purchase their pre-made sandwiches but i also don't purchase anyone's pre-made sandwiches so I'm never disappointed.
    Kenosha used to be a factory(blue collar) town with a large Italian population. I'm not sure what Kenosha is today but there is a large Super Mercado just up the street. .The store was never the destination of the rich and famous and is not to this day. It is frequented by the Italian population in the area and by many others for which they do a surprisingly good job but it's not a Chicago chic type of place.-Dick

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