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Victory Garden at Peterson & Campbell, Lots are available

Victory Garden at Peterson & Campbell, Lots are available
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  • Victory Garden at Peterson & Campbell, Lots are available

    Post #1 - April 26th, 2010, 8:19 am
    Post #1 - April 26th, 2010, 8:19 am Post #1 - April 26th, 2010, 8:19 am
    Peterson Garden

    March's Chicago Foodways Roundtable speaker was LaManda Joy, of The Yarden, speaking on the history of Victory Gardens. In her presentation, she noted one location of a World War Two Victory Garden at Peterson and Campbell is an open space. She was appealing to her alderman to gain approval to revive this Victory Garden. Asian Human Services, who owns this plot, has granted permission to use this plot.

    If you live nearby or know someone who does, please pass on the good word. There are 140 plots at this location. No experience is required.

    Come garden with us! No experience necessary but enthusiasm is! Each bed in The Peterson Garden Project has 24 sq. feet of gardening space. That allows for a lot of fresh produce for your family and friends. Before you commit, please be willing to: Visit your plot 2-3 times per week Be committed


    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - April 26th, 2010, 8:41 am
    Post #2 - April 26th, 2010, 8:41 am Post #2 - April 26th, 2010, 8:41 am
    Do note that the Peterson garden project is charging a fee of $45 per growing season, which they are currently defining as June through October of 2010.
  • Post #3 - April 26th, 2010, 9:41 am
    Post #3 - April 26th, 2010, 9:41 am Post #3 - April 26th, 2010, 9:41 am
    A friend and I (both small households) are looking for an additional person or two who might like to share in the cost (the plot contribution is $45 plus materials), labor, time and, most of all, harvest! While I have a nice space for container gardening, there are some things that I know would benefit tremendously from being grown in ground. I am also excited about having access to their gardening experts and know that even the tips from other gardeners will improve my results, both at there and at home. If you'd be interested in partnering with my friend Sean and I in this, please let me know by PM or email.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #4 - April 26th, 2010, 10:19 am
    Post #4 - April 26th, 2010, 10:19 am Post #4 - April 26th, 2010, 10:19 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:A friend and I (both small households) are looking for an additional person or two who might like to share in the cost (the plot contribution is $45 plus materials), labor, time and, most of all, harvest! While I have a nice space for container gardening, there are some things that I know would benefit tremendously from being grown in ground. I am also excited about having access to their gardening experts and know that even the tips from other gardeners will improve my results, both at there and at home. If you'd be interested in partnering with my friend Sean and I in this, please let me know by PM or email.

    I'll do it. I'm thinking about melons & perhaps corn, who knows.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #5 - April 26th, 2010, 10:33 am
    Post #5 - April 26th, 2010, 10:33 am Post #5 - April 26th, 2010, 10:33 am
    pairs4life wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:A friend and I (both small households) are looking for an additional person or two who might like to share in the cost (the plot contribution is $45 plus materials), labor, time and, most of all, harvest! While I have a nice space for container gardening, there are some things that I know would benefit tremendously from being grown in ground. I am also excited about having access to their gardening experts and know that even the tips from other gardeners will improve my results, both at there and at home. If you'd be interested in partnering with my friend Sean and I in this, please let me know by PM or email.

    I'll do it. I'm thinking about melons & perhaps corn, who knows.


    Great news!! I've emailed them for the details. I'm excited about this--I can never do melons or anything "viney" because of space!! Thinking about potatoes too...
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #6 - April 26th, 2010, 10:46 am
    Post #6 - April 26th, 2010, 10:46 am Post #6 - April 26th, 2010, 10:46 am
    pairs4life wrote:I'll do it. I'm thinking about melons & perhaps corn, who knows.


    Very challenging.

    We tried melons a few years ago -- no luck, due in part to our short growing season, but this year is shaping up to be a longer one than most, and I'm sure it depends on the melon (we tried watermelon and the three that grew ended up being no larger than softballs, and they had very indistinct flavor).

    Be interesting to see what happens with corn, which I believe is pretty tough to grow if all you have is a few rows.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #7 - April 26th, 2010, 10:49 am
    Post #7 - April 26th, 2010, 10:49 am Post #7 - April 26th, 2010, 10:49 am
    David Hammond wrote:had very indistinct flavor).

    Be interesting to see what happens with corn, which I believe is pretty tough to grow if all you have is a few rows.


    Corn is both a nutrient and space hog. Unless you've got lot's of room, you're better off buying it in the store, since we get such great local corn here in these parts. At least that's the conclusion I've come to after a couple of years of trying to grow the stuff myself.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #8 - April 26th, 2010, 10:52 am
    Post #8 - April 26th, 2010, 10:52 am Post #8 - April 26th, 2010, 10:52 am
    Sundevilpeg,

    Thanks for digging up the details on the cost.

    I once rented a plot for $25 some years ago. It just was just too far away from home to make it feasible. Sharing the effort sounds like a good idea.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - April 26th, 2010, 10:53 am
    Post #9 - April 26th, 2010, 10:53 am Post #9 - April 26th, 2010, 10:53 am
    David and Steve--thanks for the feedback. I've only ever had container gardens so in ground is a whole new world for me. Any suggestions on what I might want to consider moving (figuratively since I haven't planted much of anything but lettuce, arugula and carrots yet) from my container plan to the plot?
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #10 - April 26th, 2010, 11:35 am
    Post #10 - April 26th, 2010, 11:35 am Post #10 - April 26th, 2010, 11:35 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:David and Steve--thanks for the feedback. I've only ever had container gardens so in ground is a whole new world for me. Any suggestions on what I might want to consider moving (figuratively since I haven't planted much of anything but lettuce, arugula and carrots yet) from my container plan to the plot?


    Not sure how to answer that, tomatoes and cukes are obvious possibilities, but if you have more room, how about beans? You'd want to set up a trellis, but as your vertical space is unlimited, why not?
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #11 - April 26th, 2010, 11:42 am
    Post #11 - April 26th, 2010, 11:42 am Post #11 - April 26th, 2010, 11:42 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:David and Steve--thanks for the feedback. I've only ever had container gardens so in ground is a whole new world for me. Any suggestions on what I might want to consider moving (figuratively since I haven't planted much of anything but lettuce, arugula and carrots yet) from my container plan to the plot?



    Besides the obvious tomatoes, I've had very good luck with peppers of all sorts, eggplant, carrots, beans, broccoli (though it needs a lot of space) and cukes. Lettuces and radishes are good early and late crops that do well in the cooler spring and fall weather.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #12 - April 26th, 2010, 1:27 pm
    Post #12 - April 26th, 2010, 1:27 pm Post #12 - April 26th, 2010, 1:27 pm
    Hi all - Thanks for the interest in Peterson Garden!

    If you want an idea of the types of things you can grow, check this link out http://ow.ly/1DiYE It shows how much you can get in a raised bed (ours will be 6x4' so 24sq ft of growing area) and also provides ideas on what to grow.

    We'll also be on hand to help! We recently got some heirloom tomato starts donated so we'll have those and some seeds to share. It's going to be fun! Please help spread the word!
  • Post #13 - April 26th, 2010, 3:20 pm
    Post #13 - April 26th, 2010, 3:20 pm Post #13 - April 26th, 2010, 3:20 pm
    In a 6'X4' plot, I'd suggest limiting yourself to about four heirloom tomato plants, and really do it right - stake or cage them, mulch them, and, most importantly, prepare the hell out of the soil before planting. Choose the varieties carefully, and make sure you bet the maximum benefit of the in-ground space.
  • Post #14 - April 26th, 2010, 3:45 pm
    Post #14 - April 26th, 2010, 3:45 pm Post #14 - April 26th, 2010, 3:45 pm
    Peterson Garden wrote:If you want an idea of the types of things you can grow, check this link out http://ow.ly/1DiYE It shows how much you can get in a raised bed (ours will be 6x4' so 24sq ft of growing area) and also provides ideas on what to grow.


    If this is the format that is being offered, I'd suggest looking into using the Square Foot Gardening method (and forgetting about planting the broccoli. It takes up too much room in a small garden).
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #15 - April 26th, 2010, 3:47 pm
    Post #15 - April 26th, 2010, 3:47 pm Post #15 - April 26th, 2010, 3:47 pm
    Peterson Garden wrote:Hi all - Thanks for the interest in Peterson Garden!

    If you want an idea of the types of things you can grow, check this link out http://ow.ly/1DiYE It shows how much you can get in a raised bed (ours will be 6x4' so 24sq ft of growing area) and also provides ideas on what to grow.

    We'll also be on hand to help! We recently got some heirloom tomato starts donated so we'll have those and some seeds to share. It's going to be fun! Please help spread the word!


    Do we need to provide our own potting mix & fertilizer I presume? What about source of water?

    Do we get to choose our own plots? Heading over to your link now.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #16 - April 26th, 2010, 5:26 pm
    Post #16 - April 26th, 2010, 5:26 pm Post #16 - April 26th, 2010, 5:26 pm
    Soil will be provided (organic mushroom compost and garden soil mix).

    We are working out the water situation. The lot has an old water source on it (not sure if it still works). Option B is the business next door will put in a Y valve. The Alderman's office is taking care of the water situation.

    In terms of picking your own plot... how we lay it out depends on how many gardeners sign up so we can talk about selecting plots when we know more about layout.

    Please let me know if you have any additional questions!

    Thank you!
  • Post #17 - April 26th, 2010, 8:50 pm
    Post #17 - April 26th, 2010, 8:50 pm Post #17 - April 26th, 2010, 8:50 pm
    In a 6'X4' plot, I'd suggest limiting yourself to about four heirloom tomato plants,


    For the $45 charge wouldn't you be better off buying an earth box, planting tomato plants in it, avoid burning fossil fuels going back and forth, and so forth.

    And in year two you'd save the $45.
  • Post #18 - April 26th, 2010, 9:03 pm
    Post #18 - April 26th, 2010, 9:03 pm Post #18 - April 26th, 2010, 9:03 pm
    auxen1 wrote:
    In a 6'X4' plot, I'd suggest limiting yourself to about four heirloom tomato plants,


    For the $45 charge wouldn't you be better off buying an earth box, planting tomato plants in it, avoid burning fossil fuels going back and forth, and so forth.

    And in year two you'd save the $45.


    I'm bad w/ measurements. I scored 8 earthboxes so I was particularly interested in things that may desire more elbow room.

    I've been encouraged to try my hand at melons in the earthboxes (quite a few folks do it w/ success) & there's a woman here who has home-made containers who has also been successful.

    The increased sense of community & shared knowledge could be a positive that outweighs the initial cost & the burning of fossil fuels ( but as a 1 car family-- it can be a logistical pain in the bottom--hear you).
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #19 - April 26th, 2010, 9:24 pm
    Post #19 - April 26th, 2010, 9:24 pm Post #19 - April 26th, 2010, 9:24 pm
    pairs4life wrote:
    auxen1 wrote:
    In a 6'X4' plot, I'd suggest limiting yourself to about four heirloom tomato plants,


    For the $45 charge wouldn't you be better off buying an earth box, planting tomato plants in it, avoid burning fossil fuels going back and forth, and so forth.

    And in year two you'd save the $45.


    I'm bad w/ measurements. I scored 8 earthboxes so I was particularly interested in things that may desire more elbow room.

    I've been encouraged to try my hand at melons in the earthboxes (quite a few folks do it w/ success) & there's a woman here who has home-made containers who has also been successful.

    The increased sense of community & shared knowledge could be a positive that outweighs the initial cost & the burning of fossil fuels ( but as a 1 car family-- it can be a logistical pain in the bottom--hear you).


    PFL: I have two additional participants--I'll email you to give you the specifics. I'm thinking we may want to get two plots. I have a different plan for my tomatoes so won't probably want to do those but have a number of other options as I mentioned last week at lunch. I too like the opportunity to obtain information from the community, as well as those sponsoring this. I've been growing my own veggies every summer for the last 9 years but I still feel like I have no idea what I'm doing :P

    I also think it sounds like fun. If we carpool, that will hopefully help with the fossil fuel burning issue. Not that i recall anyone saying that was a factor in why we were interested in doing this but I guess everyone's entitled to an opinion.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #20 - April 28th, 2010, 10:47 pm
    Post #20 - April 28th, 2010, 10:47 pm Post #20 - April 28th, 2010, 10:47 pm
    Thanks for all the comments on The Peterson Garden Project. We're at Day 3 and have 20 gardeners already! Hope you'll consider gardening with us! www.petersongarden.org
  • Post #21 - April 30th, 2010, 10:29 am
    Post #21 - April 30th, 2010, 10:29 am Post #21 - April 30th, 2010, 10:29 am
    Due to overwhelming interest we're going to have an info meeting! I know it is short notice but would love it if you could make it if you're interested.

    Sunday, May 2
    Estrada Restaurant
    2639 W Peterson Ave (two blocks west of garden)
    5pm (sharp)
    Free appetizers if we buy a drink (twist my arm) doesn't have to be booze
    We'll do Q&A and, weather permitting, a garden look-see
  • Post #22 - September 22nd, 2010, 9:56 pm
    Post #22 - September 22nd, 2010, 9:56 pm Post #22 - September 22nd, 2010, 9:56 pm
    Went hunting for this thread since the garden was featured on the front page of the Sun Times Food Section today and it reminded me that no one had ever posted on it since we started.

    There are a number of LTH'ers participating in the garden's inaugural year and I can't speak for them, but I thought it was a terrific experience. Considering that this project began literally days before planting season commenced; organized a huge group of people to put in a garden on top of a vacant lot of slab covered in weeds; and inspired volunteers and donors to do everything from moving soil, to building raised beds, to providing free gardening classes, to fighting tomato blight. I've never seen anything like it. And I learned a lot. It was wonderful to experiment with things like okra and cow peas and potatoes that I'd never thought to try out in my home garden. I learned that even really crappy soil can generate beautiful produce. And I learned to be thankful for the second story location of my home garden because I never knew the havoc that insects and vermin (I'm talking about you garden bunny) can wreak!!

    I would say that I "hope" LaManda Joy can work another miracle and find a way to bring the Petersen Garden project back in 2011 but I'm pretty sure that she'll do that and more. And I look forward to joining her.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #23 - September 23rd, 2010, 4:42 am
    Post #23 - September 23rd, 2010, 4:42 am Post #23 - September 23rd, 2010, 4:42 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:I would say that I "hope" LaManda Joy can work another miracle and find a way to bring the Petersen Garden project back in 2011 but I'm pretty sure that she'll do that and more. And I look forward to joining her.


    Agreed. Here's a link to the Sun Times piece.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #24 - September 23rd, 2010, 8:11 am
    Post #24 - September 23rd, 2010, 8:11 am Post #24 - September 23rd, 2010, 8:11 am
    I also have a plot here and it's been a really great experience. I love that everyone has been so open and sharing with their knowledge, and it's been great to see my little plot grow through the summer.
  • Post #25 - February 21st, 2012, 10:30 pm
    Post #25 - February 21st, 2012, 10:30 pm Post #25 - February 21st, 2012, 10:30 pm
    The Peterson Garden Project is sponsoring their annual seed swap on Sunday, March 4, 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., at Swedish Covenant Hospital’s Galter Pavilion, Second Floor, 5140 N. California.

    There is no cost for admission.

    Trade your eggplant for zucchini, your cucumber for tomato. In addition to the seed exchange, there will also be opportunities to learn about planting, edible seeds, heirloom vegetables, and more. I did this last year and got some fantastic stuff--and got rid of some things that I knew I didn't need but didn't want to go to waste.

    Also, for those of you have been following the garden, we are moving! The current location is being turned into a medical clinic but Peterson Garden Project volunteers will be on hand to discuss the three new community gardens they've secured for 2012. Details on sign-up to reserve garden plots will come mid-March; sign up for the Peterson Garden Project newsletter or follow their Facebook page for the latest information on the 2012 growing season.

    Dues are $65 and include a 10’ x 4’ raised bed with organic soil, mentoring from master gardeners and access to the project’s learning programs.

    Links for Additional Information
    www.petersongarden.org
    www.facebook.com/petersongarden
    www.twitter.com/petersongarden
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #26 - February 22nd, 2012, 9:26 am
  • Post #27 - April 4th, 2012, 8:49 am
    Post #27 - April 4th, 2012, 8:49 am Post #27 - April 4th, 2012, 8:49 am
    FIVE new gardening locations this year--all but one (Montrose Green--where I'll be) are still available but going fast. Gardening with this community has been such a fun, educational and inspirational part of my summer, I can't imagine what it would be like now without it. If you're interested, head over to the new, spiffy website that they were able to develop as a result of winning a grant from Mondavi Winery. http://www.petersongarden.org/
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #28 - April 4th, 2012, 9:01 am
    Post #28 - April 4th, 2012, 9:01 am Post #28 - April 4th, 2012, 9:01 am
    And, for those too lazy to go to the website but curious, the new locations are:

    GLOBAL GARDEN
    Lawrence/Sacramento
    Location: Albany Park - 33rd Ward
    Partnership: Coalition for Limited English Speaking Elderly and the North River Commission/Albany Park Chamber of Commerce
    Grow2Give Produce will be given to TBD

    LAND ON LINCOLN
    Lincoln/Sacramento
    Location: North Park - 40th Ward
    Partnership: Alderman Patrick O'Connor
    Grow2Give Produce will be given to WIC

    MONTROSE GREEN
    FULL
    At the Montrose Brown Line Stop
    Location: North Center - 47th ward
    Partnership: Northcenter Neighborhood Association and Herrington Brown, LLC
    Grow2Give Produce will be given to The Common Pantry

    STARS GARDEN
    Lincoln/Jersey
    Location: West Ridge - 50th Ward
    Partnership: Alderman Debra Silverstein
    Grow2Give Produce will be given to TBD

    VEDGEWATER
    Broadway/Rosemont
    Location: Edgewater - 40th ward
    Partnership: Edgewater North Neighbors and Loyola Lakeshore Campus
    Grow2Give Produce will be given to Care for Real
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #29 - April 5th, 2012, 8:18 pm
    Post #29 - April 5th, 2012, 8:18 pm Post #29 - April 5th, 2012, 8:18 pm
    I signed up for a plot, at either Land on Lincoln or Global Garden. Fingers crossed I'll win the plot lottery. This will be interesting... I've never gardened before. Are there any other LTHers signing up?
    "To get long" meant to make do, to make well of whatever we had; it was about having a long view, which was endurance, and a long heart, which was hope.
    - Fae Myenne Ng, Bone
  • Post #30 - April 5th, 2012, 11:15 pm
    Post #30 - April 5th, 2012, 11:15 pm Post #30 - April 5th, 2012, 11:15 pm
    LemonEater:

    La Manda Joy of the Peterson Garden Project will be giving a presentation on April 24th for the Rogers Park Garden Group - you should come by and pick her brain! Good prep for putting in a plot.
    Here's the info:

    Victory Gardens Revisited

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