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  • Chicago Fishing Websites

    Post #1 - April 25th, 2008, 3:02 pm
    Post #1 - April 25th, 2008, 3:02 pm Post #1 - April 25th, 2008, 3:02 pm
    Chicago Fishing Websites

    Here are two websites devoted to fishing in the Chicagoland area:

    http://www.chitown-angler.com/1fish/index.php

    http://www.chicagolandfishing.com/forums/index.php
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #2 - April 25th, 2008, 5:35 pm
    Post #2 - April 25th, 2008, 5:35 pm Post #2 - April 25th, 2008, 5:35 pm
    Thanks for posting these, David - always looking to learn. I had run across one of these previously, and got the excellent tip that you can fish the Northshore Sanitation canal just off Howard - though you certainly don't want to eat anything you catch (there are signs up and down the length of it warning you not to let the water come in contact with your body)

    We did try this, and found the fish were biting, if not actually taking the bait. Good place to learn, I thought.
  • Post #3 - April 25th, 2008, 5:48 pm
    Post #3 - April 25th, 2008, 5:48 pm Post #3 - April 25th, 2008, 5:48 pm
    Mhays wrote:though you certainly don't want to eat anything you catch (there are signs up and down the length of it warning you not to let the water come in contact with your body)


    I chatted with a lady from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago today -- and she seemed (predictably, perhaps) to downplay the toxic dangers of the waterways, but overall my sense is that the people who fish the rivers and lakes around here eat what they catch. "Catch and release" is a game I never understood; it's almost sadistic; I think smelt dippers and others Chicagoland fishers eat whatever they get, and you know, if one eats corporate meat, with all its antibiotics and evil, then why not eat a fish from the Chicago River?
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #4 - April 25th, 2008, 6:09 pm
    Post #4 - April 25th, 2008, 6:09 pm Post #4 - April 25th, 2008, 6:09 pm
    Good lord, Dave Hammond's found me at CLF now?!?!?

    Just kidding, by the way, the smelt are running in Wisconsin
    http://www.chicagolandfishing.com/forum ... ight=smelt
  • Post #5 - April 25th, 2008, 8:41 pm
    Post #5 - April 25th, 2008, 8:41 pm Post #5 - April 25th, 2008, 8:41 pm
    Jay K wrote:Good lord, Dave Hammond's found me at CLF now?!?!?

    Just kidding, by the way, the smelt are running in Wisconsin
    http://www.chicagolandfishing.com/forum ... ight=smelt


    Yeah, it seems smelts are currently to be found further north. Discussion on the CLF board seems to be tending toward over-fishing or zebra mussels as the reason for their disappearance from Chicagoland. Me, I blame Round Goby.

    Tight lines, bro.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #6 - April 26th, 2008, 5:40 am
    Post #6 - April 26th, 2008, 5:40 am Post #6 - April 26th, 2008, 5:40 am
    A few more fishing links

    Somewhat elderly, but most of the info is probably still good. I'll bet the bait machine is still out there.
  • Post #7 - April 26th, 2008, 6:13 am
    Post #7 - April 26th, 2008, 6:13 am Post #7 - April 26th, 2008, 6:13 am
    David Hammond wrote:"Catch and release" is a game I never understood; it's almost sadistic.

    I get where you're coming from, David - and I don't disagree entirely, but fishing, like many other things, has a learning curve (particularly when you're learning on your own) and this is a good way to get practice.

    David Hammond wrote: I chatted with a lady from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago today -- and she seemed (predictably, perhaps) to downplay the toxic dangers of the waterways, but overall my sense is that the people who fish the rivers and lakes around here eat what they catch....I think smelt dippers and others Chicagoland fishers eat whatever they get, and you know, if one eats corporate meat, with all its antibiotics and evil, then why not eat a fish from the Chicago River?


    I'd generally agree here as well - but I wouldn't extend that to the Sanitation Canal in Evanston - I can't imagine the signs are there for no reason. There's some kind of connection to the Skokie Water treatment plant, as well as having two junkyards and a concrete plant on its shores who don't appear to be the most conscientious of neighbors. It does bother me greatly that we have what could be a terrific natural resource that's misused in this manner.
  • Post #8 - April 26th, 2008, 6:47 am
    Post #8 - April 26th, 2008, 6:47 am Post #8 - April 26th, 2008, 6:47 am
    2008 Illinois Sports Fish Consumption Advisory wrote:SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – The Illinois Department of Public Health today announced its 2008 consumption advisories for sport fish caught in Illinois waters. The advisory includes less stringent advice for some Lake Michigan fish. The following lakes are new to the special mercury advisory this year: Evergreen Lake and Mt. Olive New City Lake. These additions are the result of expanded and directed sampling by the Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program and do not suggest that Illinois fish are becoming more contaminated.

    “The advisories are not meant to discourage people from eating fish, but should be used as a guideline to help anglers and their families decide the types of fish to eat, and how to prepare fish for cooking to reduce possible contaminants,” said Dr. Damon T. Arnold, state public health director. “Fish can be an important part of a balanced diet. It is a good source of high quality protein and other nutrients and is low in fat. However, contaminants in fish may make some fish unsafe to eat except in limited quantities, particularly for women of childbearing age and young children.”

    While there is no known immediate health threat from eating contaminated fish from any body of water in Illinois, there are concerns about the effects of long-term, low-level exposure to pesticides and chemicals, such as chlordane, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and methylmercury, found in fish listed on the advisories. Methylmercury has been found to cause reproductive damage and have adverse effects on the central nervous system, including developmental delays....

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