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Why Every Drinker Should Know What Bottled-in-Bond Means

Why Every Drinker Should Know What Bottled-in-Bond Means
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  • Why Every Drinker Should Know What Bottled-in-Bond Means

    Post #1 - April 29th, 2018, 10:31 am
    Post #1 - April 29th, 2018, 10:31 am Post #1 - April 29th, 2018, 10:31 am
    Spirits maven Wayne Curtis, author of the fantastic, And A Bottle of Rum . . ., has a really informative piece at Daily Beast's website . . .

    at dailybeast.com, Wayne Curtis wrote:These criteria included a lot of asterisks of scant interest to the general consumer—the spirit had to made by a single distiller during a single distilling season, it had to be aged in wood for at least four years, and it had to be bottled at exactly 100-proof. But what was of interest to the consumer was that the bottle contained what the label promised: an unadulterated spirit.

    Why Every Drinker Should Know What Bottled-in-Bond Means

    In this cash-grab era of disappearing age statements, it's nice to know that when buying bonded bourbon, you're getting at least 4 years of aging in the barrel, as opposed to the minimum 2 years required for the distillate to actually be labeled as bourbon.

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #2 - April 29th, 2018, 3:49 pm
    Post #2 - April 29th, 2018, 3:49 pm Post #2 - April 29th, 2018, 3:49 pm
    One more reason I really respect Heaven Hill and their line of products. Far more are bottled in bond than any distillery I'm aware of. Hell...Mellow Corn is bottled in bond!

    We can debate how much of a quality signifier it is, but it absolutely guarantees a certain amount of aging and I also think that it speaks to a distillery's appreciation of history and doing things a certain way, even when they might not be necessary anymore. I like that in almost every industry in which I am a consumer, but particularly whiskey which seems to be rapidly evolving and moving further and further away from its roots in a lot of ways (some good, some not so good).

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