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Pappy Van Winkle 15-year [& other fine American whiskey]

Pappy Van Winkle 15-year [& other fine American whiskey]
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  • Post #331 - September 27th, 2018, 7:40 am
    Post #331 - September 27th, 2018, 7:40 am Post #331 - September 27th, 2018, 7:40 am
    RIP 6 Year Heaven Hill Bottled in Bond

    On the bright side, maybe all that aging whiskey that would have gone into this will = a boom in McKenna 10 in the near future. That's one of the brands Heaven Hill is committed to.
  • Post #332 - October 20th, 2018, 2:38 pm
    Post #332 - October 20th, 2018, 2:38 pm Post #332 - October 20th, 2018, 2:38 pm
    Just got back from Skokie Binny's where there were about four bottles of Weller Special Reserve (Green label) on the shelf (limit one). I snagged one and then asked at the manager's counter if they also had the Weller Antique 107 (Red Label) and they said they did and handed me a bottle! Green is $24.99 and Red was $25.99.
  • Post #333 - January 11th, 2019, 9:01 pm
    Post #333 - January 11th, 2019, 9:01 pm Post #333 - January 11th, 2019, 9:01 pm
    Anyone has comment (positive | negative) about the whiskies [the Highland Black 8-year-old Blended Scotch, and the Glen Marnoch Islay Single Malt. They cost $17 and $24, respectively.] sold at Aldi which I have glimpsed some mentions of recently?
    The 1987 Chevrolet Sprint has not been confidence-inspiring for a while, so I have avoided motoring to spots, including the Aldi which is across the avenue from a Walmart. But, when it is fixed, grocery | beverage shopping is on the short list. Should I give this whisky a shot {oops}? :twisted:
    The links you can use, without the fluff, or sales pitch: http://208.84.112.25/~pudgym29/bookmark4.html
  • Post #334 - January 12th, 2019, 3:13 pm
    Post #334 - January 12th, 2019, 3:13 pm Post #334 - January 12th, 2019, 3:13 pm
    As much as I believe the VW whiskeys are, perhaps, the most overhyped of all the whiskeys, I had a pour of the VW 2018 15-year last night that was one of the tastiest bourbons I've had in a long time. There were some really beautiful notes of caramel, vanilla and butterscotch. The smooth finish was absolutely glorious. I've been drinking a lot less bourbon these days but this really hit the bullseye.

    I ended up with a couple bottles of VW this year but not the 15-year and now I'm kind of sorry I didn't dig a bit harder to get a bottle of it. That said, it's not definitely not worth the prices being sought on the secondary market. But as I see it at bars this year, I'll be checking pricing and ordering a pour here and there if the pricing's reasonable.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #335 - January 12th, 2019, 4:48 pm
    Post #335 - January 12th, 2019, 4:48 pm Post #335 - January 12th, 2019, 4:48 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I had a pour of the VW 2018 15-year last night that was one of the tastiest bourbons I've had in a long time. There were some really beautiful notes of caramel, vanilla and butterscotch. The smooth finish was absolutely glorious
    I had a pour of a ten year old Rip Van Winkle 107 over new years at a friends house, immediately thought vanilla and caramel. I mention this as its exceedingly unusual for me to think flavor notes when consuming alcohol. :)
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #336 - January 12th, 2019, 9:17 pm
    Post #336 - January 12th, 2019, 9:17 pm Post #336 - January 12th, 2019, 9:17 pm
    107? Oh, the Old Rip 10 Year? A couple of years back the 10 (technically not Van Winkle) was super-great, so I assume it's still great. As is, per Ronnie, the 15-year Pappy. There has never been more bourbon at a variety of price points available, and a lot of it blurs into anonymity or coasts on satisfactory MOR mediocrity, but whenever there's a special occasion and I pour the 15 I'm still totally impressed by the flavor and balance. Just the sweet spot all around. So I think it's more than hype, I think it's some serious quality control on the part of whoever is picking and mixing the barrels. I'll only believe it's overhyped when someone can point me to a bourbon that's as consistently great. That said, I've never paid more than retail for bottle, but as the prices of more conventional bourbons creep up and up the retail price of Pappy seems more and more reasonable.
  • Post #337 - January 12th, 2019, 9:27 pm
    Post #337 - January 12th, 2019, 9:27 pm Post #337 - January 12th, 2019, 9:27 pm
    Vitesse98 wrote:That said, I've never paid more than retail for bottle, but as the prices of more conventional bourbons creep up and up the retail price of Pappy seems more and more reasonable.

    An excellent point! It has gotten more and more reasonable as the bourbon market has continued its ascent.

    The Old Rip 107 is still wonderful, and seems to be the same juice as it always was, even though it's been migrated to a taller, narrower, rail-friendly bottle (a few years back). Fwiw, this is the first bourbon I ever loved, drinking from G Wiv's private stock, in his backyard, over a decade ago in what I believe was 2006 or 2007.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #338 - January 12th, 2019, 10:44 pm
    Post #338 - January 12th, 2019, 10:44 pm Post #338 - January 12th, 2019, 10:44 pm
    Vitesse98 wrote:107? Oh, the Old Rip 10 Year? A couple of years back the 10 (technically not Van Winkle) was super-great, so I assume it's still great.

    Still great, this particular bottle was bought by my friend in 2011 or thereabouts.
    VanW3.jpg Old Rip Van Winkle 107

    ronnie_suburban wrote:The Old Rip 107 is still wonderful, and seems to be the same juice as it always was, even though it's been migrated to a taller, narrower, rail-friendly bottle (a few years back). Fwiw, this is the first bourbon I ever loved, drinking from G Wiv's private stock, in his backyard, over a decade ago in what I believe was 2006 or 2007.

    Ronnie, those were the good old days, 107 was $27.50 per bottle. If I remember corectly, and I may not, those were 7-year, not ten.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #339 - January 12th, 2019, 11:18 pm
    Post #339 - January 12th, 2019, 11:18 pm Post #339 - January 12th, 2019, 11:18 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Ronnie, those were the good old days, 107 was $27.50 per bottle. If I remember corectly, and I may not, those were 7-year, not ten.

    You could be right. I don't remember but I believe you may have a picture of me pretending to drink from the bottle, which might hold some clue.

    And yes, definitely the good old days. Under $30 and on the bottom shelf at Binny's, collecting dust because almost no one liked bourbon . . . yet.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #340 - January 13th, 2019, 11:43 am
    Post #340 - January 13th, 2019, 11:43 am Post #340 - January 13th, 2019, 11:43 am
    I must have started buying bourbon right on the cusp of the boom, because back-when I was able to find a stumpy bottle of the previous version Old Rip on the shelf at maybe even Binny's. I want to say within a year or so of this I was still able to find Lot B on the shelf, or at least in a case (at retail). A few after that I found a store near me that had placed several bottles of Old Rip 10 on the shelf at retail. Ever since then I've never seen any Pappy stuff on the shelf, or in a case, at retail, and of course the same has increasingly been the case for lots of Buffalo Trace products: Elmer T. Lee, Weller 12, even Weller Special Reserve (which is not that special) and Weller Antique (which is not old) are now often backroom ask-a-guy products.

    I feel very lucky that several years back I was able to relatively easily accumulate the whole line of Van Winkle products (even the rye!) at retail, plus the BTAC, but that look a lot of face time and shopping in a particular Binny's as I filled out my home bar collection. I don't think I would be able to pull that off again, it's just too in-demand. The irony is that there are some bottles I'm reluctant to open, since I know I can't replace them, but I also don't want to sell them because a) it's kind of lame to buy bourbon to resell and b) anyone I sold to at fair market prices I'd be concerned was just going to flip it for even more, which would also be lame.
  • Post #341 - January 14th, 2019, 9:01 am
    Post #341 - January 14th, 2019, 9:01 am Post #341 - January 14th, 2019, 9:01 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:Ronnie, those were the good old days, 107 was $27.50 per bottle. If I remember corectly, and I may not, those were 7-year, not ten.

    And yes, definitely the good old days. Under $30 and on the bottom shelf at Binny's, collecting dust because almost no one liked bourbon . . . yet.
    =R=


    I could have built quite a VW/Rip bunker with some foresight that the VW frenzy would come on the way it did. Always three or four different bottles, and always a few of each, at most Binny's, as Ronnie perfectly described, collecting dust on the very bottom shelf. Just grabbing a couple extra bottles to put away with each Binny's visit would have financed one of my girl's college funds :o :shock: :lol: . Or, being able to enjoy Pappy the rest of my life...

    I drank bourbon since the late 70's/early 80's, but back then very occasionally, not that frequently. My appreciation really started growing in the mid 90's. I never thought bourbon would have a renaissance and would never have never predicted the demand of the past several years. Hence, never felt I needed to stock up on VW's, thought they would always be there, on the bottom shelf.
  • Post #342 - January 15th, 2019, 6:44 am
    Post #342 - January 15th, 2019, 6:44 am Post #342 - January 15th, 2019, 6:44 am
    Just opened this bottle 3 days ago.
    Old Rip Van Winkle 10 yr or Eagle Rare 10 yr?
    Both now produced by the same distiller, Buffalo Trace.
    This 10 yr was acquired in a lottery from Woodmans about 3 years ago. It sold for about $80, just about list. The Eagle Rare purchased from Woodman’s when it is in stock was about $30. Eagle Rare is from BT’s Mash Bill #1, whatever that really is?
    In comparison, both are excellent with the Pappy’s having a pronounced vanilla aroma.
    I have had older Pappy’s 15yr and 21 and the primary sensation is of smoothness.
    Since you can’t hurry time along, distillers have been searching nooks and cranny’s of their warehouses for older barrels of bourbon lost or misplaced and charging very high prices. Since most of these companies are now run by ‘Bean Keepers’, I don’t think we will be seeing much bourbon in the 15 to 20 yr range as the cost is high to sit on inventory.
    Orphan Barrel, actually Diego, has had a-number of releases, one of which I purchased early on in the series and smoothness was excellent but it’s current release, Retoric 25 is priced at $200 at Woodman’s and $150 at Binny’s.
    I plan to sit out the current Boom Market and Eagle Rare is just fine for me.-Richard
    A0B5FA81-C614-4363-B9D4-3E1D58D20002.jpeg
  • Post #343 - January 15th, 2019, 11:04 am
    Post #343 - January 15th, 2019, 11:04 am Post #343 - January 15th, 2019, 11:04 am
    I've been seeing what seems like an anecdotal boom in older bourbon (or at least juice marketed as old), often at massive prices and often with some sort of misleading marketing hook, like "this was discovered in an abandoned Stitzel-Weller warehouse" or even the intimation that the older the bourbon the better. These "luxury" bottles are offset by the glut of NAS bottles, or bourbons of vague provenance, which have sprouted up the past few years like dandelions. I do think the positive flip side of this is it's helping people recognize the importance of the master distillers and others who determine just what juice gets bottled where. That's why to the bottle a brand like Four Roses is remarkably consistent and high quality, in my opinion. They really know what they're doing. I think Old Forester is cranking out some good stuff, too.

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