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Ramen Noodles
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  • Ramen Noodles

    Post #1 - January 6th, 2007, 8:46 am
    Post #1 - January 6th, 2007, 8:46 am Post #1 - January 6th, 2007, 8:46 am
    After 35 years I still enjoy a bowl of instant noodles, sometimes with the seasoning packet, and at others dressed to the nines with whatever leftovers may be in the refrigerator.

    Inventor of instant noodles dies at 96
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #2 - January 6th, 2007, 9:21 am
    Post #2 - January 6th, 2007, 9:21 am Post #2 - January 6th, 2007, 9:21 am
    I used to really dig into instant ramen also-Usually threw away the flavor pack and added tofu, miso, ginger, dried seaweed and brocolli. After taking a closer look at the ingredients, I noticed that the noodles(at least in the brands I was using-were fried in trans fatty products, or other "bad" oils. And of course you need a phd in chemistry to read the flavor packet.
    I guess this whole thing is not so horrible, except for the fact that I felt that I was eating very healthy without much work. Couldn't believe I was too lazy to look at the contents until years after slurping 'em down.
    On the other hand if I find out that Mr. Ando ate his product regularly, I'm buying a few cases, 'cause all my other habits will not add up to an age of 96.
    I love animals...they're delicious!
  • Post #3 - January 6th, 2007, 10:34 am
    Post #3 - January 6th, 2007, 10:34 am Post #3 - January 6th, 2007, 10:34 am
    Taiwan in 48-49 must have been an interesting place. With people flooding over from the mainland, bringing all their different traditions to bear...and these revolutionary noodles.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #4 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am
    Post #4 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am Post #4 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am
    Obituaries in the News
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Published: January 6, 2007
    Filed at 5:05 a.m. ET
    Momofuku Ando

    TOKYO (AP) -- Momofuku Ando, the Japanese inventor of instant noodles -- a dish that has sustained American college students for decades -- died Friday. He was 96.
    Nissin Food Products Co., the company Ando founded, said on its Web site he died after suffering a heart attack.Born in Taiwan, Ando founded his company in 1948 from a humble family operation. Faced with food shortages in post-World War II Japan, Ando thought a quality, convenient noodle product would help feed the masses.
    In 1958, his ''Chicken Ramen'' -- the first instant noodle -- was introduced after many trials. Following its success, the company added other products, such as the ''Cup Noodle'' in 1971.
    ''The Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum'' opened in 1999 in Ikeda City in western Japan commemorating his inventions.
    Ando gave a speech at the company's New Year ceremony and enjoyed Chicken Ramen for lunch with Nissin employees on Thursday before falling ill, Japan's largest daily Yomiuri reported.
  • Post #5 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am
    Post #5 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am Post #5 - January 6th, 2007, 10:48 am
    Campbells used to make a baked ramen that was infinitely less bad for you, although less tasty to be sure. However, if I were dressing it up with other things anyway, it didn't matter.

    I haven't found them in years and keep meaning to write the company... I used to buy a ton of them.
  • Post #6 - January 6th, 2007, 10:49 am
    Post #6 - January 6th, 2007, 10:49 am Post #6 - January 6th, 2007, 10:49 am
    Rest in peace, Ramen.
    (rgl201)
  • Post #7 - January 6th, 2007, 11:21 am
    Post #7 - January 6th, 2007, 11:21 am Post #7 - January 6th, 2007, 11:21 am
    Jane wrote:TOKYO (AP) ...Ando gave a speech at the company's New Year ceremony and enjoyed Chicken Ramen for lunch with Nissin employees on Thursday before falling ill, Japan's largest daily Yomiuri reported.


    That's some unfortunate writing there.
  • Post #8 - January 6th, 2007, 12:16 pm
    Post #8 - January 6th, 2007, 12:16 pm Post #8 - January 6th, 2007, 12:16 pm
    LOL - that's exactly what I was thinking!
  • Post #9 - January 6th, 2007, 1:19 pm
    Post #9 - January 6th, 2007, 1:19 pm Post #9 - January 6th, 2007, 1:19 pm
    Alas, one of my favorite midnight snack foods is the abomination known as Maruchan cream of chicken ramen...you can only eat so many(in my case 2-3 over consecutive midnights before the palate rebels)...

    I had my first in many moons two nights ago...oh sublime, milky powder(I temper it in hot water lest it clumps up amongst the noodles), oh, tensile, stringy "noodles", oh...soupcon of nam prik reddening my lips as I slowly slurp the divine manufactured goodness.

    R.I.P.

    maybe a haiku is more appropriate?
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #10 - January 6th, 2007, 1:55 pm
    Post #10 - January 6th, 2007, 1:55 pm Post #10 - January 6th, 2007, 1:55 pm
    stewed coot wrote:I used to really dig into instant ramen ... I noticed that the noodles(at least in the brands I was using-were fried in trans fatty products, or other "bad" oils.

    It's the fact that the noodles are pre-fried that makes them so quick to cook. The best advise I have is to grab the refrigerated udon packs that I've seen at Mitsuwa and elsewhere -- at least there you're just getting noodle. They'll probably survive a day unrefrigerated in your Spiderman Lunchbox or desk drawer.

    My sons (in HS and college) do very strange things with their ramen: add milk instead of water, cook the noodles and soup packet then drain and crack an egg over them back in the pan... basically any way to combine these food staples, they've done it.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #11 - January 7th, 2007, 12:04 am
    Post #11 - January 7th, 2007, 12:04 am Post #11 - January 7th, 2007, 12:04 am
    HI,

    I learned today if you unfold the ramen noodle, it will measure precisely 100 feet.

    My first introduction to ramen noodles was the Korean restaurant at Berteau and Lincoln AVenue, which is now Sun Yong Ok. My Dad worked at the adjacent office ordered it for us as a treat. Toni, his Filipino bookkeeper, thought we were crazy to spend so much money when it could be made for next to nothing at home. To prove the point, she gave me several packages to take home to try. It quickly became a regular in our household, which back then it was around 10 cents a package. My favorite flavor soup packet is the 'oriental.'

    Does anybody have the recipe for cabbage and ramen noodle salad with the dressing made from the soup packet? I like this odd salad and search it out at community dinners.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #12 - January 7th, 2007, 11:07 am
    Post #12 - January 7th, 2007, 11:07 am Post #12 - January 7th, 2007, 11:07 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Does anybody have the recipe for cabbage and ramen noodle salad with the dressing made from the soup packet? I like this odd salad and search it out at community dinners.


    Using the awesome powers of the internets, I found a tastier-than-average looking one here.

    If it looks too tasty, there were other versions at Cooks.com as well.

    Giovanna
    =o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=

    "Enjoy every sandwich."

    -Warren Zevon
  • Post #13 - January 7th, 2007, 11:20 am
    Post #13 - January 7th, 2007, 11:20 am Post #13 - January 7th, 2007, 11:20 am
    When my dad came back from the lockup (you can only evade taxes for so long) he introduced his special 'prison' version of Cup Noodles to our home. Apparently the commissary in the Lexington, KY minimum security prison sold a number of different food items, including the Chicken Cup Noodle. Dad showed us how in prison he embellished his with a combination of Worcestershire Sauce, ketchup, soy sauce, and any other open bottle of sauce he could find. It was the jail bird version of customizing Pho.

    Not surprisingly, it never really caught on with the rest of us.
    CONNOISSEUR, n. A specialist who knows everything about something and nothing about anything else.
    -Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary

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  • Post #14 - January 8th, 2007, 11:10 pm
    Post #14 - January 8th, 2007, 11:10 pm Post #14 - January 8th, 2007, 11:10 pm
    I was at my parents' house on Long Island for the holidays, and upon a trip to the ma(w)ll, I was taken aback to see a vending machine selling ramen noodle soup. I will try to take a picture when I go back to visit at the end of this month - the machine had happy face ramen noodles on the front.

    You put your money in and have to wait 2-3 minutes (I'm not sure for what, the water to boil perhaps?), and then you get ramen noodle soup....from a vending machine!

    Has anyone heard of this before?
  • Post #15 - January 9th, 2007, 2:33 pm
    Post #15 - January 9th, 2007, 2:33 pm Post #15 - January 9th, 2007, 2:33 pm
    Today's New York Times has an editorial on Ramen Noodles - worth reading. The editorial sums up Mr. Ando's invention as follows:

    "Ramen noodles have earned Mr. Ando an eternal place in the pantheon of human progress. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime. Give him ramen noodles, and you don’t have to teach him anything."

    Jyoti
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #16 - January 9th, 2007, 2:54 pm
    Post #16 - January 9th, 2007, 2:54 pm Post #16 - January 9th, 2007, 2:54 pm
    Queijo wrote:When my dad came back from the lockup (you can only evade taxes for so long) he introduced his special 'prison' version of Cup Noodles to our home.


    I just don't want this post--and this line in particular--to scroll too far up the page without commenting that it's one of the best LTH opening lines yet. :lol:

    Thanks, Queijo!
  • Post #17 - January 10th, 2007, 6:31 am
    Post #17 - January 10th, 2007, 6:31 am Post #17 - January 10th, 2007, 6:31 am
    Ann Fisher wrote:I just don't want this post--and this line in particular--to scroll too far up the page without commenting that it's one of the best LTH opening lines yet. :lol:

    Ann,

    Agreed, a great opening line and would make a terrific LTHForum logo as well.

    Calling Mike G. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - January 10th, 2007, 8:47 am
    Post #18 - January 10th, 2007, 8:47 am Post #18 - January 10th, 2007, 8:47 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I learned today if you unfold the ramen noodle, it will measure precisely 100 feet.


    Have you been playing with your ruler again?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #19 - January 10th, 2007, 10:07 am
    Post #19 - January 10th, 2007, 10:07 am Post #19 - January 10th, 2007, 10:07 am
    I found these at the Asia Supermarket in Naperville. They are the best instant ramen I've found. Instead of 1 flavor packet there is a series of 3 packets. One seemed to be the spices, one was a greasy paste (lard for pork flavor?), the third packet appeared to be peanuts and sesame seeds.

    Image

    Flip
    "Beer is proof God loves us, and wants us to be Happy"
    -Ben Franklin-
  • Post #20 - January 10th, 2007, 11:20 am
    Post #20 - January 10th, 2007, 11:20 am Post #20 - January 10th, 2007, 11:20 am
    Those are the Thai Mama brand noodles that sometimes appear on restaurant menus around town. They are very good. I know Erik has mentioed them before.
  • Post #21 - January 10th, 2007, 11:29 am
    Post #21 - January 10th, 2007, 11:29 am Post #21 - January 10th, 2007, 11:29 am
    HI,

    Thai Mama noodles are on the menu at Sticky Rice.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #22 - January 10th, 2007, 1:14 pm
    Post #22 - January 10th, 2007, 1:14 pm Post #22 - January 10th, 2007, 1:14 pm
    Flip wrote:I found these at the Asia Supermarket in Naperville. They are the best instant ramen I've found. Instead of 1 flavor packet there is a series of 3 packets. One seemed to be the spices, one was a greasy paste (lard for pork flavor?), the third packet appeared to be peanuts and sesame seeds.

    Image

    Flip


    I seem to be the lone dissenter, but I can't abide by those noodles. I find the flavoring packets gritty and off-tasting. I went through a phase where I'd pick up different varieties of ramen at the usual locations. I'd almost rather keep them around as a curiosity than consume them. Interesting that they are available on some menus. To each his own. I will stick by Maruchan when the craving hits. Of course, they don't offer(at least in Western stores) the variety found in other brands in Asian markets.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #23 - January 10th, 2007, 1:45 pm
    Post #23 - January 10th, 2007, 1:45 pm Post #23 - January 10th, 2007, 1:45 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:I seem to be the lone dissenter, but I can't abide by those noodles. I find the flavoring packets gritty and off-tasting. I went through a phase where I'd pick up different varieties of ramen at the usual locations. I'd almost rather keep them around as a curiosity than consume them. Interesting that they are available on some menus. To each his own. I will stick by Maruchan when the craving hits. Of course, they don't offer(at least in Western stores) the variety found in other brands in Asian markets.


    Yes, I've written about yam mama at Spoon Thai before, and you'll find a stir-fried MaMa noodle dish on my latest Spoon translation.

    At any rate, my Thai friends and I buy MaMa noodles by the case. For us, the favourite would likely be the green tea flavour, but it isn't always easy to find.

    And, if you, or anyone else, should care to have your eyes opened to the wonders of MaMa noodles go to TAC sometime and ask Andy to make you a bowl. Like many Thais, Andy ditches the flavouring packets entirely and takes the seasoning and doctoring of the noodles to the level of an art form. Me, I like his take on Mama with mixed seafood the best, but he also makes an excellent tom yam version.

    IMO, and in the opinion of my Thai friends, it surely kicks Maruchan and its ilk into a wet ditch.

    E.M.
    Last edited by Erik M. on January 11th, 2007, 9:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #24 - January 10th, 2007, 2:35 pm
    Post #24 - January 10th, 2007, 2:35 pm Post #24 - January 10th, 2007, 2:35 pm
    ...but what is the point if you ditch the seasoning packet?

    I certainly wouldn't turn my nose up at a handcrafted, artisan, boutique bowl of ramen noodles.

    as far as Maruchan vs. etc: far be it from me to posit Maruchan as great cuisine...I just happen to enjoy them over Sappora(?) and Top Ramen in a guilty pleasure, late nite snack way

    now...how 'bout those wonton soups in ramen cups? :twisted:
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #25 - January 10th, 2007, 6:23 pm
    Post #25 - January 10th, 2007, 6:23 pm Post #25 - January 10th, 2007, 6:23 pm
    I agree that some of the Asian ramens have interesting flavors. Growing up Maggi had significant impact; I know also that some of the Malaysian ones were great (for the intende use or otherwise).

    Erik M. wrote:And, if you, or anyone else, should deign to have your eyes opened to the wonders of MaMa noodles go to TAC sometime and ask Andy to make you a bowl. Like many Thais, Andy ditches the flavouring packets entirely and takes the seasoning and doctoring of the noodles to the level of an art form. Me, I like his take on Mama with mixed seafood the best, but he also makes an excellent tom yam version.


    I've ingested copious amounts during my undergraduate days as "Fried Maggi" (whether or not that brand was used). This dish involved addding and frying the cooked noodles along with onions, garlic, green chilies etc and assorted spices (but minus the included packet), and with additional elements . At all stages of sobriety, the spices, the add-ins together with the gunny-sack wheatiness of the noodles sang to me.
    Even now, every once in a while, I still quickly make up a batch (a comfort food of sorts) – sometimes with egg noodles, sometimes with 'ramen' which has a great (and different very specific flavor), ± hard scrambled egss, ± meats, etc. endless possibilities – all tasty. I'll have to look for yo MaMa brand. Hopefully sometime I'll get to try Andy/TAC version.

    Christopher Gordon wrote:...but what is the point if you ditch the seasoning packet?


    Ditching the flavor sachet is the point – as described above.
    Then you can save a sachet and add it to another packet for a double (or multiple) sachet enhanced bowl of ramen (made according to package directions, or not) – and the flavor sachets don't even have to be the same! :) Some flavor combinations (say, 'Oriental' and 'Masala') may not be compatible.

    Alternately, - and I'll specify first that I have done this totally sober – one can take a packet, crush the package contents without opening it, then open the packet, sprinkle the flavor sachet powder onto the dry noodles, shake, shake, shake to distribute the powder and enjoy a crunchy spicy snack. Though probably only some flavors will be good for this (see first paragraph of this post) – YMMV. Goodness myMMV – this was a memory unlocked after a good twenty years.
  • Post #26 - January 10th, 2007, 9:35 pm
    Post #26 - January 10th, 2007, 9:35 pm Post #26 - January 10th, 2007, 9:35 pm
    sazerac: and this is where I deploy the phrase "thinking outside the box" sans questionable sarcasm...

    I like the way you think

    note to self: experiment with ramen spice packets...one could almost get Deepak Chopra/John Bradshaw/Dr. Phil about it all...almost...
    :)
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #27 - January 19th, 2007, 4:26 pm
    Post #27 - January 19th, 2007, 4:26 pm Post #27 - January 19th, 2007, 4:26 pm
    Hilarious stuff. Maybe we should organize an LTHForum drunken Ramen tasting, combined with a grappa tasting to kick things off (sure sake would make more sense, but then we would not have the adventure of mixing flavors and cultures). Or we could have vodka flavored with Ramen seasoning packets. Sazerac, do you have an available stockpile?
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #28 - January 19th, 2007, 7:00 pm
    Post #28 - January 19th, 2007, 7:00 pm Post #28 - January 19th, 2007, 7:00 pm
    michaela wrote:I was at my parents' house on Long Island for the holidays, and upon a trip to the ma(w)ll, I was taken aback to see a vending machine selling ramen noodle soup. I will try to take a picture when I go back to visit at the end of this month - the machine had happy face ramen noodles on the front.

    You put your money in and have to wait 2-3 minutes (I'm not sure for what, the water to boil perhaps?), and then you get ramen noodle soup....from a vending machine!

    Has anyone heard of this before?


    Ex-boyfriend works for Nissan and he's gone on several lengthy business trips to Tokyo. He used to regale me with stories of what he had found in a vending machine that day. If you can imagine it, the Japanese probably have it in a vending machine.
  • Post #29 - January 20th, 2007, 7:23 pm
    Post #29 - January 20th, 2007, 7:23 pm Post #29 - January 20th, 2007, 7:23 pm
    michaela wrote:You put your money in and have to wait 2-3 minutes (I'm not sure for what, the water to boil perhaps?), and then you get ramen noodle soup....from a vending machine!

    Has anyone heard of this before?


    Not quite the smiley face ramen dispenser, but see this post by CrazyC

    dicksond wrote:Hilarious stuff. Maybe we should organize an LTHForum drunken Ramen tasting <snip>
    Sazerac, do you have an available stockpile?


    Hilarious? I was being totally earnest. And yes, for the drunken Ramen tasting, I do have an available stockpile - but not of the ramen :twisted:
  • Post #30 - January 21st, 2007, 2:32 pm
    Post #30 - January 21st, 2007, 2:32 pm Post #30 - January 21st, 2007, 2:32 pm
    merkay wrote:
    michaela wrote:I was at my parents' house on Long Island for the holidays, and upon a trip to the ma(w)ll, I was taken aback to see a vending machine selling ramen noodle soup. I will try to take a picture when I go back to visit at the end of this month - the machine had happy face ramen noodles on the front.

    You put your money in and have to wait 2-3 minutes (I'm not sure for what, the water to boil perhaps?), and then you get ramen noodle soup....from a vending machine!

    Has anyone heard of this before?


    Ex-boyfriend works for Nissan and he's gone on several lengthy business trips to Tokyo. He used to regale me with stories of what he had found in a vending machine that day. If you can imagine it, the Japanese probably have it in a vending machine.


    I have been to Japan many times, and though I think of myself as being very Americanized, I never knew how much foreigners delight in Japanese vending machines. In 2002, my friend came back from Japan with dozens of photos of vending machines -- he even posed in front of his favorite one (with the canned Asian and English teas in your choice of hot or cold).

    There are vending machines selling beer which are on timers and turn themselves off at a certain time (11pm)? It's still shocking when I see little kids buying beer from a vending machine and running it home for their parents.

    So back to ramen, I used to boil the ramen noodles, strain them (like pasta), and rinse with cold water (so it's not as mushy). I felt that this sort of "washed away" the tropical oils. I would then make the soup using the soup packets, but adding twice the water to make it less salty. I then add the noodles into the soup and sometimes add veggies (but usually can't wait that long and eat it as is). Am I kidding myself that this preparation makes it a tiny bit "healthier"?

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