LTH Home

Vesuvio gravy recipe needed

Vesuvio gravy recipe needed
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Vesuvio gravy recipe needed

    Post #1 - March 30th, 2018, 1:45 pm
    Post #1 - March 30th, 2018, 1:45 pm Post #1 - March 30th, 2018, 1:45 pm
    I have a beautiful brisket to serve (sweet) but feel like I need another dish; I recently hurt my back so was thinking of possible hacks.

    Anyone have an idea of how to make a big batch of Vesuvio gravy/sauce that I could make and just add some cut up Costco rotisserie chickens for reheating? I know olive oil and chicken stock, lots of garlic and maybe parsley...just wondering about quantities and ratios. Appreciate any assistance this esteemed group can provide!
  • Post #2 - March 30th, 2018, 2:43 pm
    Post #2 - March 30th, 2018, 2:43 pm Post #2 - March 30th, 2018, 2:43 pm
    Yeah, I'm looking for one too, a good recipe.

    I find that the recipes I've used in the past might have the gravy right, but have the garlic all wrong. To taste like it should (Bruna's, the old Harry Caray's by O'Hare, Mirabella), you shouldn't be able to see the garlic, and it should have a background semi-roasted taste, not redolent by any means. I always thought it something to do with the temperature that the garlic cooks at in the oil (and sometimes butter) to begin with, but if it starts to brown, then you might as well throw it out and start over. It's a fine line to walk.
  • Post #3 - March 30th, 2018, 2:46 pm
    Post #3 - March 30th, 2018, 2:46 pm Post #3 - March 30th, 2018, 2:46 pm
    jnm123 wrote:Yeah, I'm looking for one too, a good recipe.

    I find that the recipes I've used in the past might have the gravy right, but have the garlic all wrong. To taste like it should (Bruna's, the old Harry Caray's by O'Hare, Mirabella), you shouldn't be able to see the garlic, and it should have a background semi-roasted taste, not redolent by any means. I always thought it something to do with the temperature that the garlic cooks at in the oil (and sometimes butter) to begin with, but if it starts to brown, then you might as well throw it out and start over. It's a fine line to walk.


    Doesn’t help that I decided this at the last minute.

    In the 70s and early 80s we used to go to a place in Morton Grove, Villa Toscana, and I always loved theirs the best.
  • Post #4 - March 30th, 2018, 6:38 pm
    Post #4 - March 30th, 2018, 6:38 pm Post #4 - March 30th, 2018, 6:38 pm
    I remember that place, on Lincoln if I'm not mistaken, or Dempster. I grew up in Skokie.
  • Post #5 - March 30th, 2018, 10:58 pm
    Post #5 - March 30th, 2018, 10:58 pm Post #5 - March 30th, 2018, 10:58 pm
    Lincoln Ave near Pequod’s and the library!
  • Post #6 - March 31st, 2018, 8:29 am
    Post #6 - March 31st, 2018, 8:29 am Post #6 - March 31st, 2018, 8:29 am
    I haven't tried this recipe but I've made the dish before and this recipe appears to be pretty standard.

    If you're using rotisserie chicken though, you might want to add some (at least a couple of tablespoons) schmaltz with the olive oil to get more chicken flavor, i.e., the flavor you'll be missing out on by not cooking the chicken from raw in the pan.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #7 - March 31st, 2018, 9:12 am
    Post #7 - March 31st, 2018, 9:12 am Post #7 - March 31st, 2018, 9:12 am
    BR wrote:I haven't tried this recipe but I've made the dish before and this recipe appears to be pretty standard.

    If you're using rotisserie chicken though, you might want to add some (at least a couple of tablespoons) schmaltz with the olive oil to get more chicken flavor, i.e., the flavor you'll be missing out on by not cooking the chicken from raw in the pan.


    Thank you, excellent idea. What do you about using garlic confit to mellow the flavors?
  • Post #8 - March 31st, 2018, 9:19 am
    Post #8 - March 31st, 2018, 9:19 am Post #8 - March 31st, 2018, 9:19 am
    sujormik wrote:
    BR wrote:I haven't tried this recipe but I've made the dish before and this recipe appears to be pretty standard.

    If you're using rotisserie chicken though, you might want to add some (at least a couple of tablespoons) schmaltz with the olive oil to get more chicken flavor, i.e., the flavor you'll be missing out on by not cooking the chicken from raw in the pan.


    Thank you, excellent idea. What do you about using garlic confit to mellow the flavors?

    I've usually never found chicken vesuvio to have too much garlic flavor. So as long as you saute the garlic, I think it will be mellow enough. You could always cut back a little on the garlic by a clove or two.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more