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Rancho Gordo [type] beans

Rancho Gordo [type] beans
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  • Post #31 - March 3rd, 2017, 9:59 am
    Post #31 - March 3rd, 2017, 9:59 am Post #31 - March 3rd, 2017, 9:59 am
    Hi,

    Last year Culinary Historians hosted Christy Rost who lives in Colorado and Texas.

    She brought Anasazi beans from Adobe Milling of Dove Creek, Colorado, 1-800-542-3623. www.AnasaziBeans.com

    According to the package:
    Anasazi beans were one of the few crops cultivated by the Anasazi Indians. Anasazi (ahn-a-sa-zee) is a Navajo word meaning "ancient ones." The Anasazi Indians are best identified for their architectual achievements known today as cliff dwellings and inhabited these structures as early as 130 AD. Today these structures can be seen of areas such as Masa Verde National Park, located in southwestern Colorado.


    These were excellent beans and indeed cooked fairly readily.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #32 - August 2nd, 2017, 10:12 am
    Post #32 - August 2nd, 2017, 10:12 am Post #32 - August 2nd, 2017, 10:12 am
    James Hamblin at TheAtlantic.com wrote:Recently [Helen] Harwatt and a team of scientists from Oregon State University, Bard College, and Loma Linda University calculated just what would happen if every American made one dietary change: substituting beans for beef.

    If Everyone Ate Beans Instead of Beef

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #33 - December 31st, 2017, 12:57 pm
    Post #33 - December 31st, 2017, 12:57 pm Post #33 - December 31st, 2017, 12:57 pm
    Don't forget the Big Handsome Johnny Beans! Every well-curated collection of artisinal legumes must include a bag or two.

    Image

    Find 'em at Polish markets.
  • Post #34 - December 31st, 2017, 3:20 pm
    Post #34 - December 31st, 2017, 3:20 pm Post #34 - December 31st, 2017, 3:20 pm
    I've never bought any from him, but I know that Henry Brockman that comes to the Evanston farmer's market, raises some dried heirloom beans that he sells at the market. It might be in August when he sells them. He only has two or three varieties he sells. If you have the space you can also raise your own. I don't cook a lot of dried beans except for lentils and split peas. I go the lazy route, and mostly use canned beans. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #35 - December 31st, 2017, 6:55 pm
    Post #35 - December 31st, 2017, 6:55 pm Post #35 - December 31st, 2017, 6:55 pm
    Cooked up a batch of RG black eyed peas for New Year's Day today, and they are delicious. Absolutely worth the work and price.
  • Post #36 - April 18th, 2018, 9:51 am
    Post #36 - April 18th, 2018, 9:51 am Post #36 - April 18th, 2018, 9:51 am
    There's a very informative and well-written piece about RG's role in boosting the humble bean, posted at the New Yorker's website . . .

    at NewYorker.com, Burkhard Bilger wrote:I thought about that meal last spring, when I first met Steve Sando. We were standing at a table heaped with hibiscus flowers, at an outdoor market in the town of Ixmiquilpan, three hours north of Mexico City in the state of Hidalgo. It was a Thursday morning in May, and the stalls were full of women gossiping and picking through produce: corn fungus and cactus paddles, purslane and pickling lime, agave buds and papalo leaf that smelled of mint and gasoline. Sando, who is fifty-eight, ambled among them in a white guayabera shirt, untucked at the waist. He had on loose jeans, tennis shoes, and a bright-red baseball cap that said “Rancho Gordo” above the bill. He could hardly have looked more American, yet he fit in perfectly somehow. He was built like a giant bean.

    That may seem too easy, beans being Sando’s business. But people are often shaped by their obsessions, and in Sando’s case the similarities are hard to miss. His body is mostly torso, his skin both ruddy and tanned, like a pinto. He makes a colorful first impression, gets a little starchy if you crowd him, then slowly softens up. Fifteen years ago, when Sando founded Rancho Gordo, he had no food-retailing or farming experience. Now he’s the country’s largest retailer of heirloom beans and a minor celebrity in the culinary world. He’s a side dish who’s become a staple.

    The Hunt for Mexico’s Heirloom Beans

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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