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Today's Discovery
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  • Post #91 - March 11th, 2017, 8:44 am
    Post #91 - March 11th, 2017, 8:44 am Post #91 - March 11th, 2017, 8:44 am
    My latest discovery is Trader Joe's "Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend". I LOVE everything bagels, but can't eat them more than a couple times a year. I've been putting this mix on my scrambled eggs w/goat cheese or on steamed veggies. It's sooooooooo good. Everything that's on an everything bagel is in there: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, dried minced onion, black sesame seeds and poppy seeds.
  • Post #92 - April 6th, 2017, 5:14 pm
    Post #92 - April 6th, 2017, 5:14 pm Post #92 - April 6th, 2017, 5:14 pm
    More like today's rediscovery, as I've had this in the distant past. But I was checking out the newish Patel Brothers grocery store out on Gold Rd., and I spotted the Swad Bombay Sandwich Spread, which is essentially a purée of cilantro, mint, and chiles -- but those are ingredients I like, and having a jar of it on hand is a good thing. Be advised, even the mild is a bit spicy, so if you're spice-averse, it might not be a good choice. But if you like having an easy way to add big flavor to anything, including just a slice of bread, this works well. Glad to have rediscovered it.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #93 - April 7th, 2017, 7:34 am
    Post #93 - April 7th, 2017, 7:34 am Post #93 - April 7th, 2017, 7:34 am
    Cynthia wrote:Swad Bombay Sandwich Spread, which is essentially a purée of cilantro, mint, and chiles

    I remember walking into a friend's kitchen to see her husband and young sons eating Chinese chili-garlic sauce spread on bread.

    I would have been knocked flat on my butt doing the same.

    I might buy this Bombay spread as a gift sometime.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #94 - April 11th, 2017, 8:20 pm
    Post #94 - April 11th, 2017, 8:20 pm Post #94 - April 11th, 2017, 8:20 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Cynthia wrote:Swad Bombay Sandwich Spread, which is essentially a purée of cilantro, mint, and chiles

    I remember walking into a friend's kitchen to see her husband and young sons eating Chinese chili-garlic sauce spread on bread.

    I would have been knocked flat on my butt doing the same.

    I might buy this Bombay spread as a gift sometime.

    Regards,
    Cathy2


    Then be advised, there are two versions -- mild and spicy. Even the mild has a bit of a kick. But make sure you don't reach for the wrong jar -- unless you're giving it to someone who likes it hot. The mild, which is my preference, is far more cilantro and mint than chile -- enough bite to be interesting, but not to cause unnecessary pain.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #95 - April 11th, 2017, 8:28 pm
    Post #95 - April 11th, 2017, 8:28 pm Post #95 - April 11th, 2017, 8:28 pm
    Another "rediscovery." Was wandering through Krystyna's and saw they had Andy's Goose Paté. I haven't seen it in some time at the store where I originally found it, so I was glad to see it's still around. It's made with goose meat, veal, and goose liver, and it's a very tasty emergency meal, nice plain or spread on rye bread.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #96 - April 12th, 2017, 2:08 pm
    Post #96 - April 12th, 2017, 2:08 pm Post #96 - April 12th, 2017, 2:08 pm
    Hi,

    At Shop and Save, they has a rabbit pate, which is very good. The cost was less than $6 per pound and this week around $3 per pound.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #97 - May 3rd, 2017, 9:24 pm
    Post #97 - May 3rd, 2017, 9:24 pm Post #97 - May 3rd, 2017, 9:24 pm
    Today's discovery is more an observation than a recommendation. Stopped at Super H Mart on the way home from the city. There always seem to be a few things in the snack aisle that I've never seen before, and this evening, I picked up some Mr. Chips Pinoy Spaghetti Flavored Corn Chips.

    The flavor is sweet with a hint of tomato. The ingredients list identifies cheese flavor as being there, as well, but couldn't tell. Not unpleasant, just a bit unexpected -- but perhaps Pinoy Spaghetti is this sweet.

    The observation actually has nothing to do with the flavor, but rather the texture. It occurred to me that what we in the U.S. expect corn chips to be like is like fried Mexican tortillas -- with large-grind corn meal evident. In these, the corn had clearly been ground to powder leaving a very fine texture that was rather like fried pasta. Again, not unpleasant -- but it made me think of why those of us who grew up eating Mexican food expect a certain texture and flavor from things made of ground corn. People who have not had things made from masa would have no reason to not treat corn like wheat, and grind it to flour.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #98 - May 4th, 2017, 8:32 am
    Post #98 - May 4th, 2017, 8:32 am Post #98 - May 4th, 2017, 8:32 am
    Cynthia wrote: Mr. Chips Pinoy Spaghetti Flavored Corn Chips.

    The flavor is sweet with a hint of tomato. The ingredients list identifies cheese flavor as being there, as well, but couldn't tell. Not unpleasant, just a bit unexpected -- but perhaps Pinoy Spaghetti is this sweet.

    Filippino spaghetti is definitely tilts sweet, though with a garlic kick. Did you sense any garlic in there?

    I guess if they are replicating a spaghetti experience in their chip, grinding the corn fine makes sense.

    I will look out for this one to at least give it a try.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #99 - May 4th, 2017, 10:32 am
    Post #99 - May 4th, 2017, 10:32 am Post #99 - May 4th, 2017, 10:32 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Filippino spaghetti is definitely tilts sweet, though with a garlic kick. Did you sense any garlic in there?

    I guess if they are replicating a spaghetti experience in their chip, grinding the corn fine makes sense.

    I will look out for this one to at least give it a try.

    Regards,
    CAthy2


    Yes -- I looked up pinoy spaghetti when I got home, and I noticed the added sugar, as well as the use of hot dogs and luncheon meat. Didn't expect it to be like Italian sauce. Garlic is listed among the ingredients, but it was not particularly noticeable. Pleasant taste, but it was the texture of the chips that set me to thinking about what expectations certain terms (such as "corn chips") generate.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #100 - May 4th, 2017, 5:39 pm
    Post #100 - May 4th, 2017, 5:39 pm Post #100 - May 4th, 2017, 5:39 pm
    Today's snack from Super H Mart gave me a chuckle. It's a product from Ottogi called Ppushu Ppushu Noodle Snack. On the front, there is a cartoon character with a large mallet and the warning, "Don't boil it. Crunch it!"

    The reason I got a chuckle out of the product, once I opened the package, is that it's simply a brick of ramen noodles and a packet of seasoning. Infinitely familiar to most of us. Then, on the back, the illustrated instructions are Step 1: Smash Noodles! Step 2: Sprinkle Spices! Step 3: Shake and enjoy.

    I imagine someone having done this with regular packages of ramen noodles for years and suddenly getting the idea to package it as if it were something brand new. I got the BBQ Flavor, which was tasty, and a tiny bit zippier than most ramen power would be. But I still was amused by the idea of a bunch of college kids deciding, after long experience of simply smashing ramen packets, to market this alternative approach to ramen noodles.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #101 - May 10th, 2017, 11:54 am
    Post #101 - May 10th, 2017, 11:54 am Post #101 - May 10th, 2017, 11:54 am
    Found at Sunrise Indian Supermarket: Masala Oats.

    I'm guessing these will be at other Indian grocers, as well. Quick-cooking (3 minutes) oatmeal with Indian spices and, in my case, veggies. (They had a couple of flavors, and I got Veggie Twist.) Saffola is the brand, and while they may come in larger packages, the ones I saw (and bought) were one-serving packets.

    I don't do well with early-morning sugar, so this is a great alternative. Very tasty. I'll be buying them again, for those days when there is more work than there are hours.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #102 - May 12th, 2017, 8:18 am
    Post #102 - May 12th, 2017, 8:18 am Post #102 - May 12th, 2017, 8:18 am
    Discovery of sorts for me:

    Oaxacan Cheese in lieu of Chihuahua. Much less greasy with a symmetrical melt that went perfectly with my chicken, poblano, mushroom quesadilla filling.

    I had been contemplating trying it for some time, since Whole Foods botched their supply stream from Supremo brand, which makes the best chihuahua. I shredded the Oaxacan (Nuestro brand, all WF carries now) going with the grain as to not pull it apart. It worked out wonderfully. Less grease allows me to not remove so much of the juice/sauce from my filling. My view of Mexican melting cheese is more enlightened.
  • Post #103 - May 12th, 2017, 10:07 am
    Post #103 - May 12th, 2017, 10:07 am Post #103 - May 12th, 2017, 10:07 am
    That's a good tip. Thanks!
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #104 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:02 am
    Post #104 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:02 am Post #104 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:02 am
    A few years ago, I had the good fortune to spend a few days in Iceland. Loved it. And while scenery and culture top the list of things I loved, food was definitely up there, too.

    The reason I mention this is that one of the things I loved -- skyr -- is now available here. It may have been here for a while, but I just discovered it, thanks to a coupon from Jewel.

    Skyr is Icelandic yogurt -- thick, creamy, low in acidity, and even when sweetened, not as sweet as what Americans produce. It uses heirloom Icelandic cultures, which I imagine accounts for the difference in taste. Just lovely.

    The company that produces the brand I found at Jewel is Icelandic Provisions. So far, I've tried the blueberry/bilberry and the peach with cloudberry. Both are good, but of the two, I like the peach with cloudberry better. Yum.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #105 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:39 am
    Post #105 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:39 am Post #105 - May 23rd, 2017, 11:39 am
    I've used the skyr cultures to make more, using cream, which I then let drain for a few days in cheesecloth. When mixed with garlic or grated horseradish before draining, it makes a great soft spreading cheese.
  • Post #106 - May 30th, 2017, 3:31 pm
    Post #106 - May 30th, 2017, 3:31 pm Post #106 - May 30th, 2017, 3:31 pm
    nr706 wrote:I've used the skyr cultures to make more, using cream, which I then let drain for a few days in cheesecloth. When mixed with garlic or grated horseradish before draining, it makes a great soft spreading cheese.


    Yum.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #107 - July 4th, 2017, 8:31 pm
    Post #107 - July 4th, 2017, 8:31 pm Post #107 - July 4th, 2017, 8:31 pm
    Grillo's pickles, hot Italian variety. A quartered habanero and jalapeño pepper plus plenty of garlic and dill in each container. Not the cheapest (I think $6.99 for a 1 quart tub), but all-natural ingredient list and super tasty. I found them at them Whole Foods on Kingsbury (in the refrigerated case with tofu and the like). Worth seeking out if you like a good spicy (but not too spicy) pickle. Out of Boston/Cambridge, MA.
  • Post #108 - July 7th, 2017, 7:07 am
    Post #108 - July 7th, 2017, 7:07 am Post #108 - July 7th, 2017, 7:07 am
    Cynthia wrote:The reason I got a chuckle out of the product, once I opened the package, is that it's simply a brick of ramen noodles and a packet of seasoning. Infinitely familiar to most of us. Then, on the back, the illustrated instructions are Step 1: Smash Noodles! Step 2: Sprinkle Spices! Step 3: Shake and enjoy.
    reminds me of Brian Regan's bit on Pop Tarts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8kThoZpF_U
    -
    I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be.
  • Post #109 - July 10th, 2017, 9:28 pm
    Post #109 - July 10th, 2017, 9:28 pm Post #109 - July 10th, 2017, 9:28 pm
    Sweet Willie wrote:
    Cynthia wrote:The reason I got a chuckle out of the product, once I opened the package, is that it's simply a brick of ramen noodles and a packet of seasoning. Infinitely familiar to most of us. Then, on the back, the illustrated instructions are Step 1: Smash Noodles! Step 2: Sprinkle Spices! Step 3: Shake and enjoy.
    reminds me of Brian Regan's bit on Pop Tarts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8kThoZpF_U
    -


    Thanks, Sweet Willie. That was funny. And yet, I know that every step of those seemingly ridiculously simply Pop Tart instructions are there because someone did it wrong.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #110 - October 10th, 2017, 2:06 pm
    Post #110 - October 10th, 2017, 2:06 pm Post #110 - October 10th, 2017, 2:06 pm
    Today's discoveries are made of disappointment.

    1) French's Crispy Jalapenos. In the same container as their fried onions (nee Durkee's Fried Onions) but green, they have a Scoville rating of about 2-6. A nice green grassiness, like you'd get in a bell pepper, but as much heat as a partly cloudy day.

    2) Lay's Kettle Cooked Everything Bagel with Cream Cheese Chips
    One of this year's new flavor contestants, its cream cheese has less impact than typical sour cream chips -- just a hint of dairy, and the everything 'flavor' missed the point that everything bagels have texture: Sesame and poppy seeds are mostly crunch, this has just a dusty coating. And there's no onion, garlic, caraway or pepper to be noted either.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #111 - October 10th, 2017, 2:58 pm
    Post #111 - October 10th, 2017, 2:58 pm Post #111 - October 10th, 2017, 2:58 pm
    JoelF wrote:1) French's Crispy Jalapenos. In the same container as their fried onions (nee Durkee's Fried Onions) but green, they have a Scoville rating of about 2-6. A nice green grassiness, like you'd get in a bell pepper, but as much heat as a partly cloudy day.

    Plus, in my single experience with them, they were inedibly salty.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #112 - October 10th, 2017, 7:16 pm
    Post #112 - October 10th, 2017, 7:16 pm Post #112 - October 10th, 2017, 7:16 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    JoelF wrote:1) French's Crispy Jalapenos. In the same container as their fried onions (nee Durkee's Fried Onions) but green, they have a Scoville rating of about 2-6. A nice green grassiness, like you'd get in a bell pepper, but as much heat as a partly cloudy day.

    Plus, in my single experience with them, they were inedibly salty.

    =R=

    That's its high points. They're salty enough I won't just eat the box.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #113 - October 29th, 2017, 5:19 pm
    Post #113 - October 29th, 2017, 5:19 pm Post #113 - October 29th, 2017, 5:19 pm
    More comfort food than high-end or exotic -- but a friend just gave me a bag of Trader Joe's Cornbread Chips. These are crunchy squares that look kind of like large Cheez-Its but taste exactly like good cornbread. Pretty addicting.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #114 - October 30th, 2017, 8:18 pm
    Post #114 - October 30th, 2017, 8:18 pm Post #114 - October 30th, 2017, 8:18 pm
    A method and an application, rather than a product.

    I tried Jamie Oliver's recommendation to not bother cutting or peeling butternut squash. Just put it on a baking sheet, bung it in the oven at 350 degrees, and leave it for roughly 1.5 hours (depending on size of squash). Remove from oven, let sit for a few minutes, and the skin simply slides off and the squash is perfectly cooked. Seeds scoop out easily, to be roasted or tossed. And the skin is so tender that even that can be eaten. Absolutely wonderful -- and very liberating. Can't tell you how often I've skipped making squash just because cutting and peeling were so labor intensive. Not now. And perfect timing, as well, because a friend just brought over a kabocha squash. I searched online, and apparently that can be treated this way, too.

    Then the application: I cooked two whole butternut squash and have been enjoying it for a couple of days. However, I suddenly wanted a flavor boost. I thought Jamaican jerk seasoning sounded like the right flavor to enhance butternut squash. It was wonderful.

    But even if you have no interested in trying the jerk seasoning, I can highly recommend this much easier way of cooking squash.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #115 - October 30th, 2017, 9:15 pm
    Post #115 - October 30th, 2017, 9:15 pm Post #115 - October 30th, 2017, 9:15 pm
    Nice, thanks for this.

    I might mention that Shesimmers uses kabocha squash a lot, and touts the fact that the skin is edible. I tried one of her recipes and she was bang on.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #116 - November 5th, 2017, 8:16 pm
    Post #116 - November 5th, 2017, 8:16 pm Post #116 - November 5th, 2017, 8:16 pm
    Geo wrote:Nice, thanks for this.

    I might mention that Shesimmers uses kabocha squash a lot, and touts the fact that the skin is edible. I tried one of her recipes and she was bang on.

    Geo

    Thanks for the tip, Geo. Shesimmers looks like a great resource for one who loves Thai food.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #117 - November 5th, 2017, 8:22 pm
    Post #117 - November 5th, 2017, 8:22 pm Post #117 - November 5th, 2017, 8:22 pm
    New favorite crunchy snack: Mo'plleez brand Chana Choor, "Spicy beaten chick peas gram."
    Essentially, they're flattened chick peas that have been lightly fried and heavily spiced. Looking them up, they can also be spelled Chor or Jor, and are apparently a favored street food in India. But I got mine at Tony's (formerly Finer Foods, now Fresh Market), in the Asian aisle. That said, I'd imagine other outlets that cater to an Indian clientele would carry these. No idea how Mo'plleez brand stacks up to others, but this is my second bag, and I don't really see any reason to change. :)
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #118 - November 7th, 2017, 4:35 pm
    Post #118 - November 7th, 2017, 4:35 pm Post #118 - November 7th, 2017, 4:35 pm
    Saw Trader Joe's Turkey Stuffing Kettle Chips on @kevinthepang Instagram feed, finally made it to a TJ's to pick up a few bags. The intensely friendly TJ Associate suggested cranberry/tomato salsa to dip, an excellent suggestion. I'd venture Mr. Pang is responsible for tens of tens of tens chip lovers flocking to TJ's for turkey stuffing chips.

    TJStuffingChips1.jpg Trader Joe's Turkey Stuffing Kettle Chips

    TJStuffingChips2.jpg Turkey sandwich lunch with TJ's turkey Stuffing chips and cranberry tomato salsa


    TJ's Turkey Stuffing Chips, count me a (surprised) Fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #119 - November 8th, 2017, 8:10 am
    Post #119 - November 8th, 2017, 8:10 am Post #119 - November 8th, 2017, 8:10 am
    G Wiv wrote:TJ's Turkey Stuffing Chips, count me a (surprised) Fan!

    It's certainly a better idea than some of the misguided abominations from Lay's, such as cappucino or gyros (which was more a problem of execution than idea).
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #120 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm
    Post #120 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm Post #120 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm
    JoelF wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:TJ's Turkey Stuffing Chips, count me a (surprised) Fan!

    It's certainly a better idea than some of the misguided abominations from Lay's, such as cappucino or gyros (which was more a problem of execution than idea).


    I see this flavor regularly at Kroger - known here in TN as Kroger's - so somebody must be buying them. I've not worked up the courage to try as I'm strictly a plain ruffled chip or thick cut mesquite BBQ chip kind of guy.

    http://www.junkfoodguy.com/wp-content/u ... ern-01.jpg

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