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Ottolenghi: Cooking from Jerusalem and Plenty

Ottolenghi: Cooking from Jerusalem and Plenty
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  • Ottolenghi: Cooking from Jerusalem and Plenty

    Post #1 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:58 am
    Post #1 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:58 am Post #1 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:58 am
    Based on some posts in What cookbook would you want to cook your way through?, here is a spot to post your creations from these two cookbooks.

    Here is Basmati & wild rice with chickpeas, currants & herbs.
    Image

    We found this recipe to be complex and delicious-- soft chickpeas, chewy wild rice, and fragrant rice (I used jasmine), punctuated with sweet chickpeas and tasty fried onions.

    I look forward to seeing what you cook from this book!
    Cheers, Jen
  • Post #2 - May 3rd, 2013, 1:57 pm
    Post #2 - May 3rd, 2013, 1:57 pm Post #2 - May 3rd, 2013, 1:57 pm
    Sweet chickpeas?
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #3 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:04 pm
    Post #3 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:04 pm Post #3 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:04 pm
    Jen,

    Which book & page?
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #4 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:13 pm
    Post #4 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:13 pm Post #4 - May 3rd, 2013, 4:13 pm
    Habibi wrote:Sweet chickpeas?


    Oops-- should be "sweet golden raisins"... clearly I had chickpeas on the brain!

    Also, this is from Jerusalem, page 106.

    Cheers, Jen
  • Post #5 - May 3rd, 2013, 6:32 pm
    Post #5 - May 3rd, 2013, 6:32 pm Post #5 - May 3rd, 2013, 6:32 pm
    We've really enjoyed cooking from Jerusalem. I know I'm not the only one b/c when I was shopping at the Middle Eastern Grocery on Foster for ingredients for some of the recipes, the proprietor said, "you bought the Jerusalem cookbook, huh?"

    Mejadra and butternut squash tahini spread (and cucumber salad--not from Jerusalem).

    Image[/URL]
  • Post #6 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:45 pm
    Post #6 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:45 pm Post #6 - May 3rd, 2013, 10:45 pm
    What a Great Cookbook!
    I've cooked several thing so far from it-
    2 of my favorites are the Spiced Sauteed
    Chickpeas & Chopped "Middle Eastern" Salad on pg.56-
    The Yellow/Green Beans Salad on pg. 42- they call the Mixed Green Salad-
    amazingly savory spiced salad.
    So tasty!!
    And- and pg.120- there's a recipe for a dish called- "Mejadra",
    unknown to me-a major comfort food through the Levant....which is so much like Arroz y Grandules in
    composition- meaning a Rice + a Legume...instead of a sofrito- there's a M.E./Arab Spice mixture
    w/Cinnamon,Turmeric, Allspice + Sugar along w/ savory elements including
    a Crispy Fried Onion Topper= that reels this baby, IN!

    Buy THIS BOOK!
    (and another, new favorite on Amazon= BURMA Rivers of Flavors, by Naomi Duguid
  • Post #7 - May 3rd, 2013, 11:48 pm
    Post #7 - May 3rd, 2013, 11:48 pm Post #7 - May 3rd, 2013, 11:48 pm
    Hot off the presses!

    international - James Beard Winner, 2012
    Jerusalem: A Cookbook
    by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi
    (Ten Speed Press)
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - May 16th, 2013, 11:32 am
    Post #8 - May 16th, 2013, 11:32 am Post #8 - May 16th, 2013, 11:32 am
    Hi,

    I am making yogurt, labnam, pickled turnips & beets and a few others before going on a cooking rampage. I wonder if people may want to make some of these in quantity to gather and exchange?

    (added later) There are many recipes where a chili is called for. This book is written for a UK audience, which may explain why they are not specific. What is the likely chili they expect for these recipes?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #9 - May 16th, 2013, 2:11 pm
    Post #9 - May 16th, 2013, 2:11 pm Post #9 - May 16th, 2013, 2:11 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I am making yogurt, labnam, pickled turnips & beets and a few others before going on a cooking rampage. I wonder if people may want to make some of these in quantity to gather and exchange?

    (added later) There are many recipes where a chili is called for. This book is written for a UK audience, which may explain why they are not specific. What is the likely chili they expect for these recipes?

    Regards,


    I don't know about the chili, perhaps pick one to your taste?

    The exchange sounds like fun! One thing I would be interested in exchanging is spices and blends. I shop at the market at Kedzie and Ainsle. I have a pound of zaatar and almost as much sumac-- enough for a lifetime of hummus and breads. I would trade some for just a little rosewater or pomegranate molasses.

    Cheers, Jen
  • Post #10 - May 16th, 2013, 5:00 pm
    Post #10 - May 16th, 2013, 5:00 pm Post #10 - May 16th, 2013, 5:00 pm
    I just ordered my copy of "Jerusalem" and I am so looking forward to cooking out of it!

    Until recently, my standard source for "Middle Eastern" recipes (I know that's covering a lot of cuisines!) was Claudia Roden and her cookbooks, plus a couple of more specialized Turkish cookbooks. I only discovered contemporary Israeli cooking when I at at Zahav in Philadelphia last year. It was a real eye-opener, and now I'm really happy to have the chance to learn more.

    Thanks for these suggestions.
  • Post #11 - May 17th, 2013, 5:54 pm
    Post #11 - May 17th, 2013, 5:54 pm Post #11 - May 17th, 2013, 5:54 pm
    We really like the roasted butternut squash with tahini sauce recipe. Recently we made the recipe with Japanese sweet potatoes and I liked it even better (shown here with the turkey zucchini burgers, also from Jerusalem).

    Image
  • Post #12 - May 18th, 2013, 1:00 pm
    Post #12 - May 18th, 2013, 1:00 pm Post #12 - May 18th, 2013, 1:00 pm
    I too love this cookbook and shopped Middle Eastern Market last weekend. Cooked two dishes and both turned out excellent: baby spinach salad with dates and almonds (page 30) which used sumac from the market, and shakshuka (page 66), which used Harissa from the market (their homemade version in the cooler) and also labneh (Turkish yogurt actually kefir cheese). The Harrisa is addictingly delicious without being too spicy and the labneh is luscious good.

    I'd like to next make hummus kawarma (lamb) (page 118).

    Does anyone know where I could find lamb neck filet in Chicago?
  • Post #13 - May 18th, 2013, 6:43 pm
    Post #13 - May 18th, 2013, 6:43 pm Post #13 - May 18th, 2013, 6:43 pm
    MikeK--

    I've never seen lamb neck fillet in the US, although any good supermarket butcher shoppe in London (e.g., Waitrose) will have it. It's about 3" x 1" x 10", and very tender. I suppose that you could use any tender loin cut, but it wouldn't have the texture.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #14 - May 18th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    Post #14 - May 18th, 2013, 8:42 pm Post #14 - May 18th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    Hi,

    I would inquire about lamb neck at any Middle Eastern butcher on Devon or Kedzie/Lawrence. I get the impression they often work with whole lambs rather than boxed cuts, they are more likely to have it at a reasonable cost. If it is a must-have, you can always call Butcher and Larder, too.

    The only time I have had a neck roast was when I had a deer slaughtered to my specifications.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #15 - May 19th, 2013, 2:02 pm
    Post #15 - May 19th, 2013, 2:02 pm Post #15 - May 19th, 2013, 2:02 pm
    Here's a couple of items I prepared for a family gathering last night=

    Image
    Jerusalem Style Monk Fish Kebabs w/ Shrimp by Man_of Steel, on Flickr

    from page 226...."Grilled Fish ( and kosher Shrimp) Skewers with hawayej & Parsley"= a huge hit.
    A crowd Pleaser!

    and

    Image
    Basmati + Wild Rice w/Chickpeas and Fried Onions by Man_of Steel, on Flickr

    from page 106...."Basmati Rice and Wild Rice and Chickpeas w/ Currants & Herbs"- although I also used some dried cranberries,
    in place of the 2/3Cup of Currants.
    Another Crowd PLEASER!
    Not pictured- although phenomenal-
    a dish I made last night was
    "The Baby Spinach Salad w/Dates and Red Onions and Home Made Pita Croutons and chopped Almonds"!
    perfectly "dressed"! page 30.

    Get this cookbook!
  • Post #16 - May 19th, 2013, 2:30 pm
    Post #16 - May 19th, 2013, 2:30 pm Post #16 - May 19th, 2013, 2:30 pm
    Ottolenghi's "Jerusalem" has just won the "International" cookbook of the year from the James Beard foundation.

    Well deserved, in my opinion. The book is very inspirational and the recipes actually work.

    Ha! I see that Cathy already posted this news. I looked but did not spot it on this tiny cellphone screen. That's my defense. Thanks, Cathy!
  • Post #17 - May 19th, 2013, 3:22 pm
    Post #17 - May 19th, 2013, 3:22 pm Post #17 - May 19th, 2013, 3:22 pm
    Kosher shrimp? Is there an explanation of what that means? Unless he's gluing fins and scales to those crustaceans...?
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #18 - May 19th, 2013, 4:21 pm
    Post #18 - May 19th, 2013, 4:21 pm Post #18 - May 19th, 2013, 4:21 pm
    JoelF wrote:Kosher shrimp? Is there an explanation of what that means? Unless he's gluing fins and scales to those crustaceans...?

    Joel,

    Not everyone living in Jerusalem is observant Jewish or even Jewish, this book includes food traditions of Palestinians and others who call Jerusalem home.

    When I went into the restaurant Jerusalem on the south side, which Rene G reported on, I expected Jewish food. When I read the menu, I realized these people were from the other side of town.

    Joy - I wasn't going to say anything. Good news is still good news!

    My only gripe with this book is the cover's construction. I already have two dings which will require some ackward cosmetic surgery: tape.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #19 - May 19th, 2013, 7:03 pm
    Post #19 - May 19th, 2013, 7:03 pm Post #19 - May 19th, 2013, 7:03 pm
    Congrats on your beautiful dishes!

    I have this ebook on my ipad and this book is just beautiful. I know some people are not fond of ebooks, but I'm a cookbookaholic and ebooks save on physical space. Plus, I can travel with them.

    Hombre de Acero: you did a fantastic job. I had to look at the book because your pic looks so similar to the pic in the book - even down to the pan.
  • Post #20 - May 19th, 2013, 8:23 pm
    Post #20 - May 19th, 2013, 8:23 pm Post #20 - May 19th, 2013, 8:23 pm
    I've really been enjoying this cookbook as well. That said, I do have a few quibbles. It's written without a lot of technical detail (more a conversational recipe-writing style), which is not my favorite. And I've found that I've had to play a bit with the flavors to get things to come out to my taste. So it's not a book that I'm blown way by for its sheer visual style or explanatory ability. But it is a great roadmap for the region's cuisine, which is exactly what I wanted.

    Things I've cooked:

    Na'ama's Fattoush
    Kohlrabi salad
    Burnt eggplant with garlic, lemon & pomegranate seeds
    Barley risotto with marinated feta
    Ruth's stuffed Romano peppers (I used anaheims and I think it worked out wonderfully)
    Stuffed eggplant with lamb & pine nuts
    Turkey & zucchini burgers with green onion & cumin

    I would basically make all of these again (I've already made the fattoush, kohlrabi salad, and barley risotto twice). I've liked each one better the second time as I tweaked the flavoring to my liking.

    I would be interested in an food exchange related to this book as well.
  • Post #21 - May 20th, 2013, 8:26 am
    Post #21 - May 20th, 2013, 8:26 am Post #21 - May 20th, 2013, 8:26 am
    @ niknik- THANKS!
    I really love cooking from this Cookbook, and especially seeing the links of Arabic + Sephardic + Indian and other
    culinary traditions.
    Specifically the spice blend (Hawaij) that I used in the Yemeni-Style-Fish (along with the Shrimp I chose to add as an "upgrade" and humoursly/at least to me/ called out as Kosher Shrimp/knowing that technically these are considered "Treif " ) Skewers preparation.
    Hawaij / Hawayej / Hawaiege = Yemeni Spice Mixture
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaij
    There’s a cool history lesson in this spice blend:
    Yemen and India were stops on the ancient trade route, so this turmeric-based mix bears a
    strong resemblance to Indian masala mixtures!
    1 tsp black peppercorns
    1 tsp coriander seeds
    1.5 tsp cumin seeds
    4 whole cloves
    .5 tsp ground cardamom
    1.5 tsp ground tumeric

    I'd love to take a class about The History of FOOD- or The History of Spices.
    I find it soooo- informative about how our World became tied together- via our taste buds.
    I have several cookbooks that offer info on, say- The History of CHILE Peppers by Mark Miller-
    and a Kerela India Spice Cookbook &
    The Indian Spice Kitchen/Monisha Bharadwaj..that all offer great anecdotes and informative background-
    but none are as complete and well written, as say an Mark Bittman or Anthony Bourdain would create.
  • Post #22 - May 20th, 2013, 8:56 am
    Post #22 - May 20th, 2013, 8:56 am Post #22 - May 20th, 2013, 8:56 am
    JoelF wrote:Kosher shrimp? Is there an explanation of what that means? Unless he's gluing fins and scales to those crustaceans...?


    I think the "kosher shrimp" was something that Hombre de Acero added. The actual recipe on page 226 is just grilled fish skewers with hawajey and parsley.
  • Post #23 - May 20th, 2013, 9:58 am
    Post #23 - May 20th, 2013, 9:58 am Post #23 - May 20th, 2013, 9:58 am
    Though it should be stated that this cookbook clearly has shellfish in a few recipes and has a page dealing with the Kosher question (which I haven't bothered to read). There is no pork and, as far as I know, no recipes calling for milk and meat together. So only a few of the recipes are explicitly unkosher.
  • Post #24 - May 20th, 2013, 8:06 pm
    Post #24 - May 20th, 2013, 8:06 pm Post #24 - May 20th, 2013, 8:06 pm
    Does anyone know where I could find lamb neck filet in Chicago?


    Regarding MikeK's search for a Lamb Neck Filet - today I chatted w/ The Main Man of
    The Meat Dept
    @ Fresh Farms, and he states that their chopped Lamb Stew Meat includes
    a Lambs neck and other upper body bits.
    FWIW- They sell Lambs Hoofs and many other bits of the animal minus-
    The Baaaaa-baahhh!
    :lol:

    Fresh Farms International Market
    5740 Touhy Avenue
    Niles ,IL
    847.779.7343
  • Post #25 - May 21st, 2013, 9:02 am
    Post #25 - May 21st, 2013, 9:02 am Post #25 - May 21st, 2013, 9:02 am
    Butcher and Larder regularly has lamb neck. I'm sure they would filet it for you if you don't want to do it yourself. Call ahead.
  • Post #26 - May 21st, 2013, 2:34 pm
    Post #26 - May 21st, 2013, 2:34 pm Post #26 - May 21st, 2013, 2:34 pm
    gastro gnome wrote:I've really been enjoying this cookbook as well. That said, I do have a few quibbles. It's written without a lot of technical detail (more a conversational recipe-writing style), which is not my favorite. And I've found that I've had to play a bit with the flavors to get things to come out to my taste. So it's not a book that I'm blown way by for its sheer visual style or explanatory ability. But it is a great roadmap for the region's cuisine, which is exactly what I wanted.
    ...

    I would basically make all of these again (I've already made the fattoush, kohlrabi salad, and barley risotto twice). I've liked each one better the second time as I tweaked the flavoring to my liking.

    At one of my food history meetings, l met someone who judged Jerusalem for the Internationl Association of Culinary Professional's book awards. She had 52 books to read through, prepare three recipes to print instructions and fill out a survey.

    From those three sample recipes, she felt the cooking times were too long and some food was underseasoned. From those comments, I have been using the cooking times and temps as advisory and at least paid attention to seasonings.

    I would be interested in an food exchange related to this book as well.

    Great. Almost the whole last chapter is stuff we may want to do.

    What I have cooked:

    Chicken with caramelized onion & cardamon rice --- the first time, I did not let it simmer/steam for 50 minutes. Yesterday, I did and found a nice dark, slightly crusty rice on the bottom, which is prized in some cultures.

    I prepared both of these for dinner with pita bread to scoop and eat:
    Roasted eggplant with fried onion & chopped lemon
    Fried cauliflower with tahini (I oven roasted the eggplant instead of frying)

    Shakshuka - a variation of eggs in pergatory

    Labnam (I finally found a use for the 12-ounce can of goat milk I bought)

    Dishes I am intrigued to try sooner than later:
    Mejadra
    Maqluba

    It's always fun to try something new.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #27 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:16 am
    Post #27 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:16 am Post #27 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:16 am
    As I was preparing a feast for my husband's fishing trip, I listened to ATK's podcast#136, Beyond Falafel: Middle Eastern Food Gets A Makeover where Ottolenghi was interviewed., it's about minute 12 I think. Plenty is still the only cookbook I've ever seen where I wanted to try everything.
    Last edited by pairs4life on October 21st, 2014, 9:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #28 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:20 pm
    Post #28 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:20 pm Post #28 - May 23rd, 2013, 8:20 pm
    One thing about Jerusalem is that the recipes do yield a lot! I made the mejadra, which was a big hit with the husband, but not so much with the kid. Then we were up to our ears in leftover lentils and rice-- I could have fed us three times over.

    Tonight for dinner, I made the chicken with caramelized onions and cardamom rice (Jerusalem, page 184). This time I halved the recipe, using a package of 4 chicken thighs, and only a cup of rice, which I calculated would require 1.35 cups of water.

    One quibble, the recipe starts with browning onions and indicates that this step will take about 15 minutes-- I don't know how they were browning their onions, but it took me 45 minutes and even then the fond on the pan was starting to get dangerously brown. I've browned onions for Indian dishes and it always takes a long time.

    The chicken and rice cooked perfectly in the stated amount of time and were delicious-- but too much cinnamon for the kid. I still have leftovers, but not as much! I love the combination of rich, soft rice with warm spices (cinnamon, cloves, cardamom) and the fresh herbs (dill, cilantro, parsley), which are stirred in at the end, with the creamy yogurt. Highly recommended!

    Image

    Jen
  • Post #29 - June 7th, 2013, 9:00 pm
    Post #29 - June 7th, 2013, 9:00 pm Post #29 - June 7th, 2013, 9:00 pm
    I made the Garlic Soup with Harissa from Plenty today for dinner. We are fans of strong flavors and this soup, which has 25 cloves of garlic, really did it for us. (I am trying to use up the end of a Costco-sized bag of peeled garlic cloves). The soup is just a little sweet, and the pureed vegetables give it a texture almost like red lentil soup. The harissa was also a big hit-- just a bit spicy. I've had storebought harissa before, but fresh is leagues better. Another winner recipe from these cookbooks!

    Jen
  • Post #30 - June 9th, 2013, 1:09 pm
    Post #30 - June 9th, 2013, 1:09 pm Post #30 - June 9th, 2013, 1:09 pm
    Here's what went on that fishing trip.

    Roasted Parsnips and Sweet Potatoes with Caper Vinaigrette, Plenty, p.16

    Image
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening

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