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  • Post #31 - January 18th, 2018, 1:55 pm
    Post #31 - January 18th, 2018, 1:55 pm Post #31 - January 18th, 2018, 1:55 pm
    There is a lot of pepper and lemon in it too. I'm not curry-experienced enough to say more. Definitely taste it it next time you're at the store. My house always smells great after cooking with it. :D
  • Post #32 - January 20th, 2018, 10:42 am
    Post #32 - January 20th, 2018, 10:42 am Post #32 - January 20th, 2018, 10:42 am
    seebee wrote:If your cue rub is doing well on the shelf, I'd be surprised if your wing rubs wouldn't follow suit?

    While I've never addressed it directly with Tom or Patty Erd I get the impression they aren't keen on offering other than their own blends, which they do a terrific job with, Wiviott Rub an exception.

    Offer stands if you'd like to try Gunpowder.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #33 - January 21st, 2018, 10:57 pm
    Post #33 - January 21st, 2018, 10:57 pm Post #33 - January 21st, 2018, 10:57 pm
    Caitlin Penzey Moog wrote:"Don’t put your salt in a grinder. All you’re doing is making your salt smaller than it was before.

    Super late response, but I have a salt grinder that we put out on our table for meals, and all I’ll say is that if you have young, salt-loving children (I have 4 boys, age 12 down to 2), it certainly helps with keeping them from oversalting, as it’s a lot easier to get out of their hands prior to too much salt than a regular shaker. And I bought the salt grinder at The Spice House, to boot.
  • Post #34 - January 24th, 2018, 5:38 pm
    Post #34 - January 24th, 2018, 5:38 pm Post #34 - January 24th, 2018, 5:38 pm
    Looking for some LTH Insights about which Spice House blend might be best for a turkey-vegetable soup.

    We have frozen stock made from Sun Wah Beijing Turkey and the meat to go with it. Carrots, celery, onions and potatoes for the vegetables, perhaps with some greens.

    Which Spice House blend will add flavor and body to the soup, without overpowering the Sun Wah turkey flavor?

    Please keep in mind that the group is averse to hot peppers (darn it!) and includes a vegetarian or two (who have graciously allowed for TURKEY stock, with the meat as an optional add-in).

    Thanks for your help. For me, adding flavor and body to soups for a general group is always a puzzle.
  • Post #35 - January 24th, 2018, 10:11 pm
    Post #35 - January 24th, 2018, 10:11 pm Post #35 - January 24th, 2018, 10:11 pm
    Sunny taste of Singapore would be my first choice.It does have red pepper in it so there might be a tiny bit of heat which most people would not mind.
    Sunny taste of Spain would be my second choice.
    Both spices are salt free;a 2.5 oz bag runs about $4.75 compared to $6.15 in the glass jar so I would go with each one and try both.But ask the staff at the Spice House when you go.They are very knowledgeable and will find you the best one for what you are cooking.
  • Post #36 - January 25th, 2018, 1:13 pm
    Post #36 - January 25th, 2018, 1:13 pm Post #36 - January 25th, 2018, 1:13 pm
    jimd wrote:Which Spice House blend will add flavor and body to the soup, without overpowering the Sun Wah turkey flavor?


    If you are looking to add body, you can reduce your stock, add a thickener such as corn starch, or puree some of the vegetables - potato for instance. Adding rice or noodles can also do that, especially if you cook them in the soup.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #37 - January 26th, 2018, 9:24 am
    Post #37 - January 26th, 2018, 9:24 am Post #37 - January 26th, 2018, 9:24 am
    leek wrote:
    jimd wrote:Which Spice House blend will add flavor and body to the soup, without overpowering the Sun Wah turkey flavor?


    If you are looking to add body, you can reduce your stock, add a thickener such as corn starch, or puree some of the vegetables - potato for instance. Adding rice or noodles can also do that, especially if you cook them in the soup.

    I like a healthy bit of marjoram in my post-Thanksgiving turkey soup. It goes well with the smoky taste my leftovers give because I roast the turkey with bacon strips on top for the first few hours; the Sun Wah turkey may have a similar flavor. To add body to the soup, I agree with Leek's suggestions. You could also saute your veggies first and then add some flour to them before adding the stock. Also I usually put barley in the soup, which also adds body.
  • Post #38 - February 10th, 2018, 6:46 am
    Post #38 - February 10th, 2018, 6:46 am Post #38 - February 10th, 2018, 6:46 am
    We ended up using Spice House’s Bavarian Seasoning, but in such a small amount that it may not have had much effect. The soup was one of our better versions – though it was not surprising, considering that the stock and the meat came from Sun Wah Beijing Turkey.

    Thanx for your helpful advice. Always nice to have The LTH Living Cookbook to fall back on.

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