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Potato Gratin - Jacques Pepin

Potato Gratin - Jacques Pepin
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  • Post #31 - July 29th, 2009, 1:16 pm
    Post #31 - July 29th, 2009, 1:16 pm Post #31 - July 29th, 2009, 1:16 pm
    Jonah wrote:The Blue Marble Dairy cream, available at the Green City Market and the Evanston Farmer's Market, is outstanding. It's just the real thing, pasteurized, I believe with no additives. I don't want to know the butterfat content.

    Jonah


    Do you know which stand sells the cream you mention? I haven't seen it at the Evanston Farmer's Market. Thanks!
  • Post #32 - July 29th, 2009, 1:44 pm
    Post #32 - July 29th, 2009, 1:44 pm Post #32 - July 29th, 2009, 1:44 pm
    Kenny from Rogers Park wrote:
    Jonah wrote:The Blue Marble Dairy cream, available at the Green City Market and the Evanston Farmer's Market, is outstanding. It's just the real thing, pasteurized, I believe with no additives. I don't want to know the butterfat content.

    Jonah


    Do you know which stand sells the cream you mention? I haven't seen it at the Evanston Farmer's Market. Thanks!

    The Blue Marble Creamery is on the west side of the Evanston Farmers Market, not far from the Seedling's stand.
    -Mary
  • Post #33 - July 29th, 2009, 1:45 pm
    Post #33 - July 29th, 2009, 1:45 pm Post #33 - July 29th, 2009, 1:45 pm
    Thanks!
  • Post #34 - July 29th, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Post #34 - July 29th, 2009, 2:30 pm Post #34 - July 29th, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Fresh Farms on Touhy sells Kemp's Heavy Whipping Cream (Pasturized with contents: cream & carrageenan) for .99. They also sell several other types who's pedigree I can't vouch for, but the low priced Kemp's is what I happen to have in my fridge at the moment.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #35 - August 17th, 2009, 12:02 pm
    Post #35 - August 17th, 2009, 12:02 pm Post #35 - August 17th, 2009, 12:02 pm
    The GP wrote:
    Kenny from Rogers Park wrote:
    Jonah wrote:The Blue Marble Dairy cream, available at the Green City Market and the Evanston Farmer's Market, is outstanding. It's just the real thing, pasteurized, I believe with no additives. I don't want to know the butterfat content.

    Jonah


    Do you know which stand sells the cream you mention? I haven't seen it at the Evanston Farmer's Market. Thanks!

    The Blue Marble Creamery is on the west side of the Evanston Farmers Market, not far from the Seedling's stand.

    Update on Blue Marble's location at the Evanston Market: last week (8/15), they were along the parking garage.
    -Mary
  • Post #36 - August 20th, 2009, 4:24 pm
    Post #36 - August 20th, 2009, 4:24 pm Post #36 - August 20th, 2009, 4:24 pm
    Made it last night, using Gary's improved recipe, with pasteurized-only heavy cream, and switching out half the pecorino for a nice Gouda from Costco. Rocked the world, bigtime! Tnx to y'awl, Gary esp., who built this thread.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #37 - October 31st, 2009, 9:01 pm
    Post #37 - October 31st, 2009, 9:01 pm Post #37 - October 31st, 2009, 9:01 pm
    With sunchokes readily available in local markets these days, I swapped out the potatoes today, and made a sunchoke gratin. I was a little concerned that it would be too liquidy since sunchokes don’t have the same starch as potatoes, but I needn't have fret - the gratin came out darn near perfect. Here's approximately what I did (measurements are rough guesses).

    Sunchoke Gratin
    - Pound of sunchokes, haphazardly peeled and sliced relatively thin.
    - Cup of Blue Marble Heavy Cream
    - 4 oz Green Fields Cheese from Saxon Creamery, shredded
    - 4 oz Krotovina, shredded (hard sheeps' milk grating cheese from Prairie Fruits Farm)
    - 1-2 tbs butter
    - thyme, salt and pepper
    - a lemon

    In a well-buttered gratin dish, layer sunchoke slices, overlapping slightly. Sprinkle with a little lemon juice, thyme, salt, pepper, and 1/3 of the cream and cheese. Repeat until you've made 3 layers. Bake covered at 375 degrees for 40 minutes, then uncovered at 400 degrees for 15 minutes. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes (vital step) before serving.

    Sunchoke Gratin:
    Image


    Served with a green galad, truffle-mustard vinaigrette:
    Image

    Very good dinner, but can someone come over to wash that pan? Crusty, browned cream is stubborn.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #38 - December 25th, 2009, 10:17 am
    Post #38 - December 25th, 2009, 10:17 am Post #38 - December 25th, 2009, 10:17 am
    HI,

    I saw a potato gratin variation recently where the sliced potatoes were cooked on the stove in cream to cover. Once cooked (or almost cooked), then placed in a gratin pan with cheese. Has anyone tried it?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #39 - December 25th, 2009, 11:06 am
    Post #39 - December 25th, 2009, 11:06 am Post #39 - December 25th, 2009, 11:06 am
    I have an it works perfectly. If you have Julia Childs cookbooks, you will find this is her prefered method.
  • Post #40 - December 25th, 2009, 11:59 am
    Post #40 - December 25th, 2009, 11:59 am Post #40 - December 25th, 2009, 11:59 am
    PKramer wrote:I have an it works perfectly. If you have Julia Childs cookbooks, you will find this is her prefered method.

    I do have her books and will check.

    Thank you for the feedback!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #41 - December 25th, 2009, 1:31 pm
    Post #41 - December 25th, 2009, 1:31 pm Post #41 - December 25th, 2009, 1:31 pm
    FWIW, one of my all-time favorite cookbooks--Antoine Bouterin's Cooking Provence--features that exact method for what he calls a gratin du paysan, or "Country Casserole." He boils the sliced potatoes in milk, not cream, for ten minutes (adding only garlic and nutmeg). Then pours the potatoes into a gratin dish, tops (not layers) with gruyere, broils until melted and serves.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #42 - December 25th, 2009, 2:32 pm
    Post #42 - December 25th, 2009, 2:32 pm Post #42 - December 25th, 2009, 2:32 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    I saw a potato gratin variation recently where the sliced potatoes were cooked on the stove in cream to cover. Once cooked (or almost cooked), then placed in a gratin pan with cheese. Has anyone tried it?

    Regards,

    Yes - an extremely reliable and very satisfying method. I've done it with cauliflower, too but potatoes are infinitely better in this application.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #43 - December 25th, 2009, 10:02 pm
    Post #43 - December 25th, 2009, 10:02 pm Post #43 - December 25th, 2009, 10:02 pm
    Hi,

    Simmer potatoes in a mixture of cream and whole milk with a bay leaf and minced shallot. Finished in a buttered gratin dish with parmesan grated on top. Terrific!

    Thanks for the affirmations this was a good method.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #44 - December 28th, 2009, 10:15 am
    Post #44 - December 28th, 2009, 10:15 am Post #44 - December 28th, 2009, 10:15 am
    I actually used this method after seeing it on the Jacques cooks with Julia series on PBS. Pepin suggests that you use only milk and not to rinse the potatoes after slicing. The starch in the potatoes will thicken the dish. I only use garlic and use the same pan for stove top and oven (one less dish). Very easy dish and I'll be making it again soon with a ham my wife received for a holiday gift.
  • Post #45 - December 28th, 2009, 11:09 pm
    Post #45 - December 28th, 2009, 11:09 pm Post #45 - December 28th, 2009, 11:09 pm
    LTH,

    Incorporated the simmer in milk/cream method with a sideways twist, Habanero jack cheese. Why would I use habanero cheese? I opened the fridge it stood up waved its arms and shouted Pick Me! Pick Me!, how could I resist? In for a penny, in for a pound, so I added serrano, crushed red pepper and garlic to my potato gratin, I am sure a Frenchman somewhere someplace was rolling over in his grave.

    Ducks in a Row

    Image
    Image
    Image

    Peeled thinly sliced russets were simmered in a mix of cream, milk, salt, pepper, garlic and serrano until not-quite tender. Added to a lightly greased gratin pan and topped with shredded habanero Monterey jack cheese.

    Gratin ready for oven

    Image

    Approximately 40-minutes at 375 and then rest for 10-minutes

    Image

    I liked the texture of this gratin, potatoes had a silky quality and the gratin itself was firmer, less runny, than in gratins past. Thanks KennyZ for the suggestion to let the gratin rest.

    I made an old favorite to accompany the gratin, Corn Flake Chicken, thighs in this case, I've been eating this dish once or twice a year for decades.

    Dead simple recipe, crush corn flakes, mix melted butter, egg, salt, pepper and, in this case, crushed red pepper, sliced garlic and serrano. Coat chicken, bake. My slightly smallish chicken thighs took 45-minutes at 375 to crispy corn flake juicy chicken goodness.

    Crushed corn flakes, melted butter, eggs, garlic, crushed red pepper, fresh serrano

    Image

    Salt and pepper chicken, sprinkle with serrano and fresh sliced garlic.

    Image

    Top with cornflakes, bake at 375 for 45-minutes

    Image

    Plate, eat, enjoy

    Image

    Chicken was very juicy, gratin surprisingly not all that spicy hot, though I may have lost perspective on what constitutes spicy.

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #46 - December 29th, 2009, 8:14 am
    Post #46 - December 29th, 2009, 8:14 am Post #46 - December 29th, 2009, 8:14 am
    Gary wrote: though I may have lost perspective on what constitutes spicy.


    Ya think??! :D

    And yes, somewhere there is a platoon of French chefs saying "Nous sommes chocée, au choc, nous disons!!" Serves 'em right! You go, Gary!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #47 - December 29th, 2009, 9:56 am
    Post #47 - December 29th, 2009, 9:56 am Post #47 - December 29th, 2009, 9:56 am
    So, do you gratin mavins think it would be OK to make this dish ahead of time up to the browning stage and pop it in the oven to brown up at service time?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #48 - December 29th, 2009, 10:03 am
    Post #48 - December 29th, 2009, 10:03 am Post #48 - December 29th, 2009, 10:03 am
    stevez wrote:So, do you gratin mavins think it would be OK to make this dish ahead of time up to the browning stage and pop it in the oven to brown up at service time?


    absolutely, I've done it many times. You can even brown it all the way then just reheat with no harm.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #49 - March 7th, 2011, 12:06 pm
    Post #49 - March 7th, 2011, 12:06 pm Post #49 - March 7th, 2011, 12:06 pm
    The Sunchoke Gratin looks amazing- agreed- btw-I don't want to know the butter fat content either, but I AM getting some!
  • Post #50 - March 7th, 2011, 12:19 pm
    Post #50 - March 7th, 2011, 12:19 pm Post #50 - March 7th, 2011, 12:19 pm
    Looks good. One note on the seasonings. I think that a sprinkle of paprika helps with the browing of the dish and provides maybe a touch of flavor. I'm not sure regular store bought paprika does anything much other than act as a browning agent for baked chicken and potatoe dishes such as this but I always use it. When I get done with my current supply I will buy some paprika at Bende's or go to Penzeys. Supposedly Bendes has the real stuff imported from Hungary.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #51 - March 7th, 2011, 5:13 pm
    Post #51 - March 7th, 2011, 5:13 pm Post #51 - March 7th, 2011, 5:13 pm
    toria wrote:Supposedly Bendes has the real stuff imported from Hungary.


    As does Spice House (several varieties from diferent places including Hungary).
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #52 - March 7th, 2011, 5:27 pm
    Post #52 - March 7th, 2011, 5:27 pm Post #52 - March 7th, 2011, 5:27 pm
    Isn't the Szeged brand, which is in a lot of supermarkets, imported from Hungary as well?
  • Post #53 - May 9th, 2011, 1:48 pm
    Post #53 - May 9th, 2011, 1:48 pm Post #53 - May 9th, 2011, 1:48 pm
    This thread has gone in many different directions, but I wanted to post that I tried the "original" G Wiv / Jacques Pepin potatoes last night and they turned out perfectly. The clincher for me was adding a layer of truffle cream* between the layers of potatoes.

    I par-boiled the potatoes and then layered them with the truffle cream, salt and pepper and nobs of butter. Topped the whole thing off with a thick blanket of Vermont Shepherd's cheese which has the profile of pecorino. Then enough cream to come half way up the dish. 30 minutes in a hot oven and the result was perfectly bubbly and just as perfumed as you'd imagine.

    Image

    Served with a nicely rare and rested steak:
    Image

    You'll note that's a small portion at serving. They are very rich and I'm saving the leftovers as a base for an over easy huevo. Thank you once again for the inspiration!

    *For those put off by the taste of truffle oil, this is a completely different product and a very very nice thing to be given (or gift yourself) indeed. Find more here http://www.ilmercatoitaliano.net/Shop/Imported-Italian-Sauces-and-Tomatoes/La-Madia-Regale-White-Truffle-Cream
  • Post #54 - January 1st, 2014, 9:21 pm
    Post #54 - January 1st, 2014, 9:21 pm Post #54 - January 1st, 2014, 9:21 pm
    For New Year's Eve, I made this Serious Eats hasselback potato gratin recipe and I have to say this was absolutely the best potato gratin I have ever tasted. The method of preparation means that part of each potato slice is soft and creamy while the other part is crispy - really magical for someone like me who loves both textures. And you'll gasp at its appearance coming out of the oven - just beautiful.

    Obviously, you can play with the cheeses you use but the recipe as written is perfect. Trust me, you'll want to make this soon.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #55 - January 15th, 2014, 7:58 pm
    Post #55 - January 15th, 2014, 7:58 pm Post #55 - January 15th, 2014, 7:58 pm
    Gypsy Boy wrote:FWIW, one of my all-time favorite cookbooks--Antoine Bouterin's Cooking Provence--features that exact method for what he calls a gratin du paysan, or "Country Casserole." He boils the sliced potatoes in milk, not cream, for ten minutes (adding only garlic and nutmeg). Then pours the potatoes into a gratin dish, tops (not layers) with gruyere, broils until melted and serves.


    Welp...now you've done it! While reading through this thread, I realized that I had just the right ingredients to make a single-serving version and this method just sounded soooo eeeeeasy. I had to try it! And it was easy! And delicious!

    I covered half a thinly sliced baking potato with cream and half & half (no milk on hand), added a small bay leaf, nutmeg, cayenne, salt, pepper, and a dash of garlic powder (ran out of fresh garlic). I boiled it for 10 minutes, then transferred to a single-serving gratin, covered with shredded gruyere, and broiled until golden on top.

    au gratin.jpg Here are the results...


    This is so darn easy compared to the baking method, and I can't believe how good it was. I'll be making it next time I need to impress.
  • Post #56 - December 26th, 2015, 7:18 am
    Post #56 - December 26th, 2015, 7:18 am Post #56 - December 26th, 2015, 7:18 am
    I like the Pepin "boil the potatoes first" (in water) method when entertaining, its easy to prep the potatoes in advance (even the day before) & then assemble the gratin minus the cream. I add the cream just before baking & voila, 30 minutes later perfect gratin.

    (I'm mostly please with this because I actually remembered to take a photo of the dish when it was resting - this accompanied our holiday meal of baked cod wrapped in prosciutto).
    IMG_20151225_185033991.jpg
    IMG_20151225_185047546.jpg
  • Post #57 - March 8th, 2018, 10:11 am
    Post #57 - March 8th, 2018, 10:11 am Post #57 - March 8th, 2018, 10:11 am
    Meat & Potatoes
    GratinLTH9.jpg Meat & Potatoes

    GratinLTH6.jpg Meat & Potatoes
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow

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