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Whole Rib Roast

Whole Rib Roast
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  • Post #151 - December 26th, 2018, 11:44 am
    Post #151 - December 26th, 2018, 11:44 am Post #151 - December 26th, 2018, 11:44 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Gorgeous stuff, Gary! :D

    Here's a great video, shot by my wife, of my "stepdad" taking our Christmas Eve standing rib roast (from Zier's in Wilmette) out of the oven after its final sear. This one was 24 pounds before cooking. I've coached them well over the years but why they used a foil pan is beyond me . . .



    =R=


    I was nervous just watching that video. But, they didn't need to scrub the pan :lol:
  • Post #152 - December 26th, 2018, 12:21 pm
    Post #152 - December 26th, 2018, 12:21 pm Post #152 - December 26th, 2018, 12:21 pm
    Hi,

    Does your Step-Dad own a half-sheet pan? If not, then maybe you should give him one. It is not easy to find a pan large enough for a 24-pound roast.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #153 - December 26th, 2018, 12:39 pm
    Post #153 - December 26th, 2018, 12:39 pm Post #153 - December 26th, 2018, 12:39 pm
    Al Ehrhardt wrote:I was nervous just watching that video. But, they didn't need to scrub the pan :lol:

    Yes, there was plenty of built-in drama! There was a rack between the roast and the pan, so there was some clean-up required but not too much.

    Cathy2 wrote:Does your Step-Dad own a half-sheet pan? If not, then maybe you should give him one. It is not easy to find a pan large enough for a 24-pound roast.

    They do (several, in fact) but it wasn't long enough to accommodate this roast, which is, I suppose, why they went with the foil pan. I probably would have done the same but would have put something under the pan before removing it from the oven. You can hear my brother suggesting doing just that on the video. Oh well, all's well that ends well. The roast was delicious. :D

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #154 - December 26th, 2018, 1:14 pm
    Post #154 - December 26th, 2018, 1:14 pm Post #154 - December 26th, 2018, 1:14 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:This one was 24 pounds before cooking.

    Wow, monster standing rib roast, a delicious looking, and I'm sure tasting, monster! Mine was about 18/lbs.

    From the way you prefaced the video I was sure that beauty was going to end up on the floor, happy to see it made it safely to the counter.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #155 - December 26th, 2018, 1:22 pm
    Post #155 - December 26th, 2018, 1:22 pm Post #155 - December 26th, 2018, 1:22 pm
    G Wiv wrote:From the way you prefaced the video I was sure that beauty was going to end up on the floor, happy to see it made it safely to the counter.

    Standing there watching it, I was sure of that, too. I was stunned to see it land safely on the counter, especially because my 'stepdad'* can be accident-prone from time to time. My wife, always thinking, had the camera rolling. I guess she figured that if it ended up on the floor, she could win $10k on America's Funniest Home Videos! :lol:

    =R=

    * this is the husband of my deceased father's second wife, so I'm not really sure what his official title is to me, though he is a great guy.
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #156 - December 26th, 2018, 4:13 pm
    Post #156 - December 26th, 2018, 4:13 pm Post #156 - December 26th, 2018, 4:13 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Does your Step-Dad own a half-sheet pan? If not, then maybe you should give him one. It is not easy to find a pan large enough for a 24-pound roast
    C2, seemingly a good idea though, with a standing rib roast that large at end of cooking the volcanic hot fat will be right up, or over, the rim of the half sheet pan. A messy and potentially dangerous proposition.

    Double foil pan on a half-sheet pan or large dedicated roasting pan seem the way to go for the home.

    All is well that ends well but, as I and others have said, we were expecting the worst from that video. (YIKES)

    Truthfully, even if that beauty had ended up on the floor, I'd have happily brushed it off and eaten until I burst. :)
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #157 - December 26th, 2018, 4:25 pm
    Post #157 - December 26th, 2018, 4:25 pm Post #157 - December 26th, 2018, 4:25 pm
    Hi,

    My half-pans have a two-inch rim. I used one for a rib roast yesterday. If you do reverse sear, you have very little melted fat to worry about. To have fat for the Yorkshire puddings, I had trim off fat to melt.

    I have never used foil roasting trays. I got rid of my deep roasting pans (with lids), because I almost always use a half-pan for roasting.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #158 - December 26th, 2018, 4:54 pm
    Post #158 - December 26th, 2018, 4:54 pm Post #158 - December 26th, 2018, 4:54 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:My half-pans have a two-inch rim.
    Typical restaurant half* and full sheet pans have a one inch rim, which is what I have at home, and I'm guessing so does Ronnie_s. Also, as many standing 7-bone standing rib roasts as I've done, and I'm talking hundreds verging on or exceeding 1000, over the years, I've never done reverse sear or Sue-V. Just standard pop it in the smoker or oven.

    Upthread the ever-so-nice Evil Ronnie, who has cooked 10 or 50 times more 7-bone standing rib roast than me, put it better than I ever could.

    "This is exactly why I will always continue to roast a great piece of meat in the "old school" manner, 350-375F from start to finish, pulling at about 110 for carry over to 120-125. There is nothing in this world that comes close to the crisp, almost burnt fatty crust of a great piece of beef rib roast, seasoned well and cooked at moderately high temperature. To me that salty crispy fat, as well as the contrast between the rare center and more medium fat cap is what cooking prime rib will always be about. Not to mention the lovely pan drippings and generous supply of beef fat for your Yorkshire pudding.


    *18-by-13 inches with sides about one inch high
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #159 - December 27th, 2018, 7:47 am
    Post #159 - December 27th, 2018, 7:47 am Post #159 - December 27th, 2018, 7:47 am
    Hi,

    I am quite comfortable with reverse sear for the rare times I cook a whole rib roast. I have been happy using it for steaks and thick hamburgers, so why not apply it to the big beast.

    Plus it was pleasant getting up at 7:30 am to get it into the oven, then go back to bed for a while knowing it would all turn out well.

    I saw on Virtual Weber Bullet where some people were more extreme: cooking their meat at 125 degrees overnight, then a high heat sear.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #160 - December 27th, 2018, 8:33 am
    Post #160 - December 27th, 2018, 8:33 am Post #160 - December 27th, 2018, 8:33 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Gorgeous stuff, Gary! :D

    Here's a great video, shot by my wife, of my "stepdad" taking our Christmas Eve standing rib roast (from Zier's in Wilmette) out of the oven after its final sear. This one was 24 pounds before cooking. I've coached them well over the years but why they used a foil pan is beyond me . . .

    =R=

    Hi,

    I know you had this meat dry aged. What was the initial weight of this roast?

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #161 - January 1st, 2019, 8:02 pm
    Post #161 - January 1st, 2019, 8:02 pm Post #161 - January 1st, 2019, 8:02 pm
    Nice discussion. I did a small guy--only 3 ribs--in the now-standard Cook's/Kenji forward sear method: sear it off in my carbon-steel pan, poke in the Chef's Alarm, shoot for 118°F in a 250°F oven. Let it rest and come up to 125°F whilst I make the Yorkshire Puds.

    While I appreciate the fact that you pros (yeah, I'm talking about yinz, Ronnie and Gary! : ) do it at the higher temp, I *always* succeed with this method, so the method ain't broke, eh?

    Did the thing with stew meat, onions, tomato paste carmelized at 400°F in order to make the jus. Works like a champ. My wife, BIL, and I ate a dozen generous puds in the course of din. [burp]. Love 'em!

    Happiest o' New Years, folks! Always always a pleasure to be in your company!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #162 - March 24th, 2019, 12:41 pm
    Post #162 - March 24th, 2019, 12:41 pm Post #162 - March 24th, 2019, 12:41 pm
    Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast? Initially cooked exactly to my desired specification, it seems like any significant reheating is going to ruin it. But eaten cold, the cap will be largely unpalatable. I can separate the eye from the cap and serve the eye cold (or at room temp) but is there anything that can revive the cap? Maybe a quick sear or broil? I'd rather not relegate this leftover roast to yet another hash.

    Thanks,

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #163 - March 24th, 2019, 1:30 pm
    Post #163 - March 24th, 2019, 1:30 pm Post #163 - March 24th, 2019, 1:30 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast? Initially cooked exactly to my desired specification, it seems like any significant reheating is going to ruin it. But eaten cold, the cap will be largely unpalatable. I can separate the eye from the cap and serve the eye cold (or at room temp) but is there anything that can revive the cap? Maybe a quick sear or broil? I'd rather not relegate this leftover roast to yet another hash.

    Thanks,

    =R=

    Sous vide? Would only need to be in there long enough to bring the temperature back up, so shouldn't change the texture of the meat much, might want to re-sear afterward
  • Post #164 - March 24th, 2019, 2:03 pm
    Post #164 - March 24th, 2019, 2:03 pm Post #164 - March 24th, 2019, 2:03 pm
    Smassey wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast? Initially cooked exactly to my desired specification, it seems like any significant reheating is going to ruin it. But eaten cold, the cap will be largely unpalatable. I can separate the eye from the cap and serve the eye cold (or at room temp) but is there anything that can revive the cap? Maybe a quick sear or broil? I'd rather not relegate this leftover roast to yet another hash.

    Thanks,

    =R=

    Sous vide? Would only need to be in there long enough to bring the temperature back up, so shouldn't change the texture of the meat much, might want to re-sear afterward

    Interesting. Would you go with slices/slabs or the whole remaining hunk?

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #165 - March 24th, 2019, 2:10 pm
    Post #165 - March 24th, 2019, 2:10 pm Post #165 - March 24th, 2019, 2:10 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast?
    Assuming its one large hunk, heat in a medium-low oven covered to your original internal target cooking temp then sizzle/crisp in a hot cast iron pan.

    If you want to make sandwiches with the cold rare eye, do so and then saute the cap in gentle butter/oil increasing the heat to crisp when its heated through. With all that fat the collar/cap/spinalis dorsi* is not going to dry out.

    Third alternative, bring to my house I'll take it off your hands. No worry for you, good eats for me.

    * I used spinalis dorsi for the same reason Dr Harrold Leacher uses quid pro quo in Loaded Weapon 1 :) ----> Link
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #166 - March 24th, 2019, 7:53 pm
    Post #166 - March 24th, 2019, 7:53 pm Post #166 - March 24th, 2019, 7:53 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Smassey wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast? Initially cooked exactly to my desired specification, it seems like any significant reheating is going to ruin it. But eaten cold, the cap will be largely unpalatable. I can separate the eye from the cap and serve the eye cold (or at room temp) but is there anything that can revive the cap? Maybe a quick sear or broil? I'd rather not relegate this leftover roast to yet another hash.

    Thanks,

    =R=

    Sous vide? Would only need to be in there long enough to bring the temperature back up, so shouldn't change the texture of the meat much, might want to re-sear afterward

    Interesting. Would you go with slices/slabs or the whole remaining hunk?

    =R=

    My initial thought was to keep it whole. I did a very cursory search, and it sounds like ChefSteps recommends cooking it for the full time you would if starting raw, but at a few degrees lower than your original temperature, and yes, sear again.
    https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-a-simple-and-stress-free-way-to-reheat-almost-anything
    Then I saw Gary's response and thought, "Just do what he says!"
  • Post #167 - March 24th, 2019, 11:03 pm
    Post #167 - March 24th, 2019, 11:03 pm Post #167 - March 24th, 2019, 11:03 pm
    Smassey wrote:My initial thought was to keep it whole. I did a very cursory search, and it sounds like ChefSteps recommends cooking it for the full time you would if starting raw, but at a few degrees lower than your original temperature, and yes, sear again.
    https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-a-simple-and-stress-free-way-to-reheat-almost-anything
    Then I saw Gary's response and thought, "Just do what he says!"

    LOL - Gary is definitely a quality source. I actually think both approaches sound worthwhile but since the sous vide option requires a lot of time, I probably doesn't make sense this time around. I could see trying it in the future, though.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #168 - Yesterday, 4:54 am
    Post #168 - Yesterday, 4:54 am Post #168 - Yesterday, 4:54 am
    “Is there a good way to re-heat rib roast?”

    Unfortunately no.
    You just can’t repeal the Laws of Physics and reheat so that it matches your original.
    I reheat the cap and/or the eye until warm or eat the eye sliced In a sandwich cold.
    Many times if you rest and carve for a group by the time a slice is plated and the diner is ready to eat, the temperature is warm anyway.
    If you insist on a hot temperature, you will end up with a well done piece of meat.
    But if a high quality roast, that’s not all together a bad thing!-Richard

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