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What are you making for New Years Eve or Day??

What are you making for New Years Eve or Day??
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  • Post #61 - January 2nd, 2010, 5:24 am
    Post #61 - January 2nd, 2010, 5:24 am Post #61 - January 2nd, 2010, 5:24 am
    grits wrote:

    How was this? I ripped it out of some magazine a few weeks ago and it is up on my refrigerator.


    Hmmm, perhaps I should go back to bed. I PM'd this instead of posting it on thread:


    I've made it a couple of times now including for the Vegetarian Small Household exchange. I really like it. So does my husband who is not a usual fan of greens or sweet potatoes. I'm now partial to chard, which I wasn't before. A quick & easy weeknight offering for vegetables that I usually cook the longer southern way.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #62 - January 2nd, 2010, 9:25 am
    Post #62 - January 2nd, 2010, 9:25 am Post #62 - January 2nd, 2010, 9:25 am
    We made our traditional New Years meal of black eyed peas, collards, ham and cornbread yesterday. Only difference this year was that the recipe for each (save the ham), instead of our using traditional family recipes, was from Donald Link's Real Cajun cookbook (which I receive for Christmas). With the exception of the greens, which were a bit sweet for my taste on account of the recipe calling for some sugar and some cider vinegar that is reduced (and which I will adjust for next time accordingly), everything was better than what we've made in the past. Some pork product (or multiple pork products) in each dish; not surprising for a guy who named his restaurant Pig. Also had made the jambalaya from the same cookbook the night before (which was as good as any jambalaya I have made), so we ate leftover jambalaya with the meal instead of the typical white rice we would eat with the peas.
  • Post #63 - January 2nd, 2010, 8:33 pm
    Post #63 - January 2nd, 2010, 8:33 pm Post #63 - January 2nd, 2010, 8:33 pm
    After cleaning house all day I decided to go the easy route on New Year's Eve and ordered take-out from Katy's Dumpling House. Popped a bottle of Dom Perignon at midnight, eastern time.

    New Year's Day was Oven Fried Chicken.
    Ms. Ingie
    Life is too short, why skip dessert?
  • Post #64 - January 16th, 2010, 1:37 pm
    Post #64 - January 16th, 2010, 1:37 pm Post #64 - January 16th, 2010, 1:37 pm
    I keep forgetting to post these pics. For a NYE appetizer, I used Alton Brown's tip on microwaving crab legs. I wrapped the crab legs in damp paper towels and plastic wrap, then nuked them. It worked out great (especially since my kitchen is under construction and my makeshift 'kitchen' in the basement consists of a microwave, toaster oven that likes catch on fire and an induction burner).
    I made a bernaise sauce from Mastering the Art of French Cooking (my mom's old copy from the 60's I dug out of a box after seeing Julie and Julia).
    Image

    Image

    Image
  • Post #65 - January 16th, 2010, 1:40 pm
    Post #65 - January 16th, 2010, 1:40 pm Post #65 - January 16th, 2010, 1:40 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:I keep forgetting to post these pics. For a NYE appetizer, I used Alton Brown's tip on microwaving crab legs. I wrapped the crab legs in damp paper towels and plastic wrap, then nuked them. It worked out great (especially since my kitchen is under construction and my makeshift 'kitchen' in the basement consists of a microwave, toaster oven that likes catch on fire and an induction burner).
    I made a bernaise sauce from Mastering the Art of French Cooking (my mom's old copy from the 60's I dug out of a box after seeing Julie and Julia).
    Image

    Image



    Ive never tried that method, but those crab legs and sauce look great.
  • Post #66 - January 3rd, 2011, 4:45 pm
    Post #66 - January 3rd, 2011, 4:45 pm Post #66 - January 3rd, 2011, 4:45 pm
    Mhays wrote:
    wendy wrote: New Years is a time to look forward and hogs can't look back.

    Brilliant!
    wendy wrote:Our family made pig's stomach stuffed with sausage/pork cubes/potatowe used to steam the pig's stomach then saute in butter...The crispy 'skin' was my favorite part

    Equally brilliant! Thanks, wendy - I wish I could try it, please post pictures and more info if you make this!


    Finally!
    Pennsylvania Dutch Pig’s Stomach

    After my New Year 2010 cravings for pig’s stomach went unfulfilled, my mom ensured that my next visit home would satisfy.


    Ingredients
    2 frozen whole pig’s stomachs
    After defrosting the pig’s stomachs, they are soaked in salt water for a few hours. Scrape the stomach lining with a paring knife to remove ‘fatty bits’ and change the water a few times.

    Potato Mixture
    4-5 lbs potatoes, diced
    1 med/large onion, diced
    parsley
    salt, pepper

    Meat
    1 lb smoked sausage or 1 lb boneless country style ribs

    Image

    Stuff the stomach with the potato and pork/sausage. Though the stomach is elastic, you don’t want to overfill. (Stomach may shrink when cooking)

    Image

    Sew the stomach with twine.
    Image


    Ready to cook
    Image

    Note: Many recipes call for roasting the pig’s stomach for 2 hours in a 350 oven.

    Into the steamer for 2 hours then sauteed in butter to brown/crisp the ‘skin’
    Image


    And, ready to serve
    Image




    I continue to look for a local source for whole, cleaned pig’s stomach. There are plenty of butchers that carry pig’s stomach for buche dishes. The difference is that they are sold as a block-o-frozen-stomachs. They are not kept whole.

    I hope to have better luck when the Butcher and the Larder opens.
  • Post #67 - January 3rd, 2011, 9:42 pm
    Post #67 - January 3rd, 2011, 9:42 pm Post #67 - January 3rd, 2011, 9:42 pm
    We just finished our belated NYD dinner. On NYD, we were too lazy/hungover to make food. But tonight we had some friends over and I treated them to a traditional Korean New Years dinner of rice cake soup (aka ddukgook). I also make some tasty chapchae and some crispy zucchini scallion pancakes. Added bonus is that it was all vegetarian for my husband. There was also plenty of soju to go around!

    One of our friends lamented how he hates black eyed peas and how he wished his family had a new years tradition like the Koreans :)
  • Post #68 - January 4th, 2011, 5:18 am
    Post #68 - January 4th, 2011, 5:18 am Post #68 - January 4th, 2011, 5:18 am
    Traditional New Years Day Crab Legs

    Crab Pot
    Image

    Guests of Honor
    Image
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #69 - January 4th, 2011, 8:07 am
    Post #69 - January 4th, 2011, 8:07 am Post #69 - January 4th, 2011, 8:07 am
    stevez wrote:Crab Pot
    Image



    steve, thats a really interesting looking cooker, where did you get it?
  • Post #70 - January 4th, 2011, 8:13 am
    Post #70 - January 4th, 2011, 8:13 am Post #70 - January 4th, 2011, 8:13 am
    (1) of about (6) dishes I prepared for NYE supper.

    Sprecher Rootbeer and mirin braised babyback ribs from the oven:

    Image
  • Post #71 - January 4th, 2011, 8:18 am
    Post #71 - January 4th, 2011, 8:18 am Post #71 - January 4th, 2011, 8:18 am
    wendy wrote:Finally!
    Pennsylvania Dutch Pig’s Stomach


    That's awesome! Thanks for the pics.
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #72 - January 4th, 2011, 9:22 am
    Post #72 - January 4th, 2011, 9:22 am Post #72 - January 4th, 2011, 9:22 am
    I'm way behind but tonight I'm making champagne chicken with mushrooms and asparagus.

    And maybe a shake with pumpkin cheesecake ice cream and leftover "cool whip."
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #73 - January 5th, 2011, 6:00 am
    Post #73 - January 5th, 2011, 6:00 am Post #73 - January 5th, 2011, 6:00 am
    jimswside wrote:steve, thats a really interesting looking cooker, where did you get it?


    I found it at a garage sale around 10 years ago. It's a very cool cooker, which is technically designed for a crab boil, but I use it for lobsters and crab legs almost exclusively. If you steam enough stuff in there, you can drain the liquid out of the tap on the bottom and use it as a base for chowder, bisque or other seafood based soups.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #74 - January 2nd, 2014, 11:12 am
    Post #74 - January 2nd, 2014, 11:12 am Post #74 - January 2nd, 2014, 11:12 am
    leek wrote:Well, keep in mind that I am not a huge lobster fan. If you like lobster I'd definitely give it a try. The full French Laundry treatment involves making a bisque right then, and them making a fancy mac and cheese with the bisque, some orzo, and mascarpone, putting the chunks of poached lobster on that. I didn't do that (timing - you blanch the lobs, remove the meat from claws and tail and refrigerate it, make the bisque, then poach the meat in butter, then assemble)

    I've had that dish, and it was great when someone else did the work ;)

    Hi,

    I made butter poached lobster, because I always wanted to try this technique. I served it with mashed sweet peas and boiled potatoes. My family was disappointed by the lobster, because it didn't taste enough of lobster. I thought it was very tender, though that may be another contribution to their dismay: they expected more texture.

    If I did it again, I would prep the lobster the day before instead of just before eating. I would make the bisque as something to enjoy before moving to the lobster. Going from one to the other, there would be a more dominant lobster flavor.

    What did my family like best from this meal? The mashed sweet peas was something they'd like to do again.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #75 - January 1st, 2019, 10:22 am
    Post #75 - January 1st, 2019, 10:22 am Post #75 - January 1st, 2019, 10:22 am
    NYE dinner with friends. We steamed the lobsters with the bands on, which I understand is an ongoing pro/con discussion in Nova Scotia to rival ketchup on a hot dog or deep vs thin pizza. (No ketchup for me, and I will happily eat any pizza put in front of me)

    Lobster2018.jpg NYE


    Lobster, count me a Fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #76 - January 1st, 2019, 1:14 pm
    Post #76 - January 1st, 2019, 1:14 pm Post #76 - January 1st, 2019, 1:14 pm
    Hi,

    Christmas dinner deja vu, sort of:

    - Two bone rib roast cut off from seven bone rib roast served on Christmas
    - Cooked the last two bags of cranberries to finish them off
    - Mashed potatoes with garlic and buttermilk
    - Mozzarella and cherry tomato salad
    - Horseradish sauce of some kind
    - Pan roasted corn (an idea I hope will work)
    - Blueberries and whipped cream plus candy I squirreled away and nobody found.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #77 - January 1st, 2019, 4:12 pm
    Post #77 - January 1st, 2019, 4:12 pm Post #77 - January 1st, 2019, 4:12 pm
    I cooked the certified Black Angus choice rib roast I bought from Sunset Foods, and it was unquestionably superior to the choice rib roast I bought from Jewel for 60% of the Sunset price and cooked the exact same way last week for Christmas Eve.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #78 - January 1st, 2019, 4:43 pm
    Post #78 - January 1st, 2019, 4:43 pm Post #78 - January 1st, 2019, 4:43 pm
    Nothing much today. We ate too much yesterday at friends New Years eve party. So just smoked salmon and crackers...cheese and crackers we had left over. We will heat up some quiche for dinner. And...………...Jarlsberg cheese dip I made. Super easy and super yummy.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #79 - January 1st, 2019, 7:55 pm
    Post #79 - January 1st, 2019, 7:55 pm Post #79 - January 1st, 2019, 7:55 pm
    we had oysters, caviar, and sous-vide butter poached lobster with fresh papardelle, a samin nosrat radish/cuke/herb salad, and went a little 80's with chocolate mousse.
  • Post #80 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:45 am
    Post #80 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:45 am Post #80 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:45 am
    New Year's Eve dinner was pushed to January 2 because I wasn't feeling well. Reverse seared filet mignon, sauteed spinach, boiled potatoes.

    Image
    -Mary
  • Post #81 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:53 am
    Post #81 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:53 am Post #81 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:53 am
    We didn't book, but were treated to a New Orleans inspired New Years eve feast.

    Bacalao
    Lovely Oysters
    A little salad since something green is important in one's diet
    Amazing BBQ shrimp
    Bananas Foster

    Lots of good wine and Champers.
  • Post #82 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:14 am
    Post #82 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:14 am Post #82 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:14 am
    For our annual New Year's Day extravaganza, I made the Chili for a Crowd from the Silver Palate cook book. After year's of making YourPalWill's great chili recipe, I realized I needed something less labor intensive. The Chili for a Crowd fit the bill. It was pretty good too.
    -Mary
  • Post #83 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:23 am
    Post #83 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:23 am Post #83 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:23 am
    The GP wrote:For our annual New Year's Day extravaganza, I made the Chili for a Crowd from the Silver Palate cook book. After year's of making YourPalWill's great chili recipe, I realized I needed something less labor intensive. The Chili for a Crowd fit the bill. It was pretty good too.

    Is this Will's recipe?

    I was on WGN the other night talking about black eyed peas and other New Year's traditions. There were people from Feed in the next segment. They remembered Will's memorial service at their restaurant. Several of us read posts from LTH written by Will. He really could write, cook and eat, I still miss him.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #84 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:38 am
    Post #84 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:38 am Post #84 - January 3rd, 2019, 10:38 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    The GP wrote:For our annual New Year's Day extravaganza, I made the Chili for a Crowd from the Silver Palate cook book. After year's of making YourPalWill's great chili recipe, I realized I needed something less labor intensive. The Chili for a Crowd fit the bill. It was pretty good too.

    Is this Will's recipe?

    I was on WGN the other night talking about black eyed peas and other New Year's traditions. There were people from Feed in the next segment. They remembered Will's memorial service at their restaurant. Several of us read posts from LTH written by Will. He really could write, cook and eat, I still miss him.

    That is the recipe. I was having a hard time finding the link. It is a great chili recipe. I'm sorry I never got to meet him in person. RIP Will.
    -Mary
  • Post #85 - January 3rd, 2019, 12:04 pm
    Post #85 - January 3rd, 2019, 12:04 pm Post #85 - January 3rd, 2019, 12:04 pm
    We went French themed and made:

    Cocktails:
    -3 Mile Limit
    -Dirty Magarita

    Apps:
    -Baguettes
    -Confit Garlic
    -Charcuterie
    -Gougères

    Main:
    Duck à l'Orange

    Desserts:
    Eclairs
    Macarons
    Vanilla Crème Brûlée

    Also made our own half-sour pickles...but that's only for the sake of picklebacks, a kinda gross New Years tradition now.
    Dearest Chicago on Web
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  • Post #86 - January 3rd, 2019, 6:57 pm
    Post #86 - January 3rd, 2019, 6:57 pm Post #86 - January 3rd, 2019, 6:57 pm
    We made duck à l'orange for dinner on New Year's Day. Consulted the Serious Eats recipe. Had no luck finding bitter oranges in nearby stores, but did find a bitter orange marmalade---at Sunset, I think. Could have been Mariano's. The orange sauce packet that comes with a Maple Leaf Farms duck is better than you might expect---has some bitterness, not cloylingly sweet. Between the sauce packet and the marmalade and some fresh orange juice and zest I added, it was a bit too bitter overall, until I added some honey. The duck breasts were great, the duck fat is great, and the puppy has been loving the scraps of duck meat in her food.

    But now I need more duck in my life, and more duck practice. Today I saw Maple Leaf Farms ducks at Costco (Mettawa) for $2.99/lb, just 10 cents a pound more than the sale price I bought my NYD duck for at Woodman's and better than the price at any other store around.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #87 - January 4th, 2019, 1:26 pm
    Post #87 - January 4th, 2019, 1:26 pm Post #87 - January 4th, 2019, 1:26 pm
    We hiked up to Mitsuwa for ramen, then bought some salmon skin and sushi roll ingredients to make rolls later in the evening. Drank mezcal with orange slices and a really nice 2008 champagne. In bed by 11:30! Dogs were happy we stayed in.

    I love duck and can't get enough of it, though. Does anyone order from D'Artagnan? Their duck breasts make for great eating, and if you sign up to be on their mailing list, some good deals come your way.

    Anyways, hello everyone! I just found this site, and I'm thrilled beyond words. Happy New Year!
  • Post #88 - January 5th, 2019, 12:11 am
    Post #88 - January 5th, 2019, 12:11 am Post #88 - January 5th, 2019, 12:11 am
    pinkpajamas wrote:We hiked up to Mitsuwa for ramen, then bought some salmon skin and sushi roll ingredients to make rolls later in the evening. Drank mezcal with orange slices and a really nice 2008 champagne. In bed by 11:30! Dogs were happy we stayed in.

    I love duck and can't get enough of it, though. Does anyone order from D'Artagnan? Their duck breasts make for great eating, and if you sign up to be on their mailing list, some good deals come your way.

    Anyways, hello everyone! I just found this site, and I'm thrilled beyond words. Happy New Year!

    Welcome, and happy new year! :)

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #89 - January 5th, 2019, 5:41 am
    Post #89 - January 5th, 2019, 5:41 am Post #89 - January 5th, 2019, 5:41 am
    pinkpajamas wrote:I love duck and can't get enough of it, though. Does anyone order from D'Artagnan? Their duck breasts make for great eating, and if you sign up to be on their mailing list, some good deals come your way.


    I've not mail ordered from D'Artagnan but a good friend, who lives in Traverse City, Michigan, orders a few times a year and raves about D'Artagnan's products and service. D'Artagnan has 20-40% off sales a couple of times a year, you just missed the latest, he stocks up, mainly on Moulard duck magret and ribeye steaks. Locally I've used Chicago Game and Gourmet for duck, goose etc, though they may be wholesale/restaurant industry only.

    Another great choice for fresh whole duck, duck legs, fresh turkey, fresh chicken and frozen duck breast is Harrison Poultry in Glenview. Harrison uses White Pekin Duck from Cluver in Indiana and I've bought from them as both a restaurant and retail customer with 100% satisfaction. (It never hurts to call in advance if you want a specific product.)

    Speaking of Mitsuwa, I'm a long time fan of both the store and food courts. That said, lately I've been gravitating more toward Tensuke Market a few miles south. As of a couple of years ago Tensuke has new owners and have upped both the market and food court game considerably.

    Welcome and Happy New Year!

    https://www.dartagnan.com/
    http://chicagogame.us/
    https://www.harrisonspoultryfarm.com/index.html
    http://mitsuwa.com/ch/
    https://www.tensuke.com/
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #90 - January 5th, 2019, 8:58 am
    Post #90 - January 5th, 2019, 8:58 am Post #90 - January 5th, 2019, 8:58 am
    Hi,

    I went to an industry-event featuring products from D'Artagnan.

    One of the demonstrations was birthing a foie gras from a duck. Choice of words: birthing, was mine and not theirs. Watching the care and reverence in removing the liver, it really was akin to watching a birth.

    Thanks for the incentive to get on their mailing list.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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