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Microwave died--can I live without it?

Microwave died--can I live without it?
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  • Post #31 - February 7th, 2011, 12:05 pm
    Post #31 - February 7th, 2011, 12:05 pm Post #31 - February 7th, 2011, 12:05 pm
    I don't agonize that much about what I buy. I do research over the internet and read reviews. I hate chasing around to a zillion different stores before I buy things. I usually buy a popular brand, not something exotic or imported. After I decide generally on what I think I want I then go to a store to buy it unless I am going to order it over the internet. I wouldn't do that with a microwave because they are so easy to obtain close by. I'd probably go to Target or Walmart or Fry's because they are so close. Then I would make my decision and go with it. I do admit the color of the stainless steel matching my other appliances would be a deal breaker so that would be important to me.

    I took back 2 toaster overs to Fry's before I decided I didn't really need one. Too big for my kitchen and I have 2 ovens anyway. If I were to buy a new microwave or any other kitchen appliance I'd go to Youngs in Glen Ellyn. They have top notch service and will come out and fix things promptly and their people know their stuff, even if I pay a bit more. My microwave is built in under my cabinets and has to be hard wired and installed in there.

    For a free standing microwave, it would not be so important to buy there.

    PS I do have a friend who does not have a microwave and gets along without it fine. I think she believes good cooks do not use microwaves and is suspicious that there are health problems caused by micro waves.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #32 - February 9th, 2011, 12:42 pm
    Post #32 - February 9th, 2011, 12:42 pm Post #32 - February 9th, 2011, 12:42 pm
    I haven't had a microwave in 3 years. There simply isn't enough space in my barely existent kitchen for one. Once in a while (i.e., 3 months or so) I think one might be useful, but never enough to get around to finding a solution. I'm moving in 2 weeks and the new place has a nice built in unit, but I don't know if it will get much use.
  • Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 9:53 am
    Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 9:53 am Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 9:53 am
    Microwaves are good for softening up butter so you can put it on toast or warm bread. That and defrosting frozen things. Microwave popcorn is an abomination.
    trpt2345
  • Post #34 - February 10th, 2011, 10:41 am
    Post #34 - February 10th, 2011, 10:41 am Post #34 - February 10th, 2011, 10:41 am
    I use my microwave only to re-heat. I suggest, for people who like dishes such as braised meats or traditional stews cooked in sauces, or steamed vegetables like artichokes or potatoes, but do not have the time or the patience to wait, to use a good quality stainless steel pressure cooker. With mine I cook lamb stews in 16 minutes, veal Marengo in 20 minutes, chicken with artichokes, garlic, lemon, fresh thyme and white wine in 7 minutes, coq au vin in 8 minutes, duck legs in 20 minutes, rabbit in 18 minutes, beef Bourguignon in 40 minutes, ratatouille in 3 minutes.
    And you need less fat,
  • Post #35 - December 30th, 2017, 11:50 am
    Post #35 - December 30th, 2017, 11:50 am Post #35 - December 30th, 2017, 11:50 am
    Hi,

    I could live without a microwave, though I sure do like having one around.

    Saw a video the other day of poaching an egg in the microwave. They measured out half a cup of water, gently cracked the egg making sure it was submerged, then placed a plate over it. This was microwaved for one minute resulting in a poached egg.

    I tried this today, two ways:
    - One minute only, which had a wonderful cooked egg white and soft yolk.
    - One minute only, then added another 20 seconds: yolk was nearly cooked through.
    I'm now convinced one minute is the way to go.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - December 30th, 2017, 3:19 pm
    Post #36 - December 30th, 2017, 3:19 pm Post #36 - December 30th, 2017, 3:19 pm
    I haven't owned or used a microwave since 1996 and don't miss it.

    CSD
    Mark A Reitman, PhD
    Professor of Hot Dogs
    Hot Dog University/Vienna Beef
  • Post #37 - December 30th, 2017, 4:08 pm
    Post #37 - December 30th, 2017, 4:08 pm Post #37 - December 30th, 2017, 4:08 pm
    My microwave lives in the basement and is used primarily to defrost things that I forgot to defrost ( power level 2 for 10 minutes and then check it ) and reheating my coffee as the morning passes. I could easily live without it.
  • Post #38 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:26 pm
    Post #38 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:26 pm Post #38 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:26 pm
    The only real recipe I make in the microwave is for a potato dish. You start with new potatoes, whole if small or cut in half. Add smashed garlic cloves to taste, salt, pepper and enough olive oil to coat. Cooking time depends on the amount, just watch it and when they get soft and a little wrinkly they're done. This is usually under 15 minites. I toss them a couple times during the process. Drop dead easy and nice to do when you're grilling and don't wind up with something to make gravy out of. They're similar to oven roasted potatoes, but cook in a fraction of the time.
  • Post #39 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:45 pm
    Post #39 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:45 pm Post #39 - January 3rd, 2018, 3:45 pm
    Since we rely on frozen meats, batch-storage of sauces, and don't plan well, I don't see any alternative for defrosting. A lasagne might require defrosting sausage and tomato sauce; a stir fry needs stock and chicken thighs; etc.

    We do bacon in the micro -- it's faster, but I'm not sure it's better or easier to clean up from.

    Reheating leftovers is pretty common. How else would you warm up last night's pad thai? I have found I'm using my Breville "Smart Oven" toaster oven more for reheating things, though, especially pizza. Wouldn't work for pad thai.

    We don't do any micro-specific packaged foods (hot pockets? bleah!) popcorn is better with oil (Stir Crazy forever!); baked potatoes need crispy skins. We have on rare occasions made mug dishes such as molten cakes or "poached" an egg over leftover veg.

    If ours died, I'd want another. They're cheap, but they take up space. Thankfully we have a big kitchen, with a cabinet shelf designated for the microwave.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #40 - January 3rd, 2018, 4:04 pm
    Post #40 - January 3rd, 2018, 4:04 pm Post #40 - January 3rd, 2018, 4:04 pm
    I've never owned one. My current kitchen is too small. I survive without it. Would make reheating certain things easier.
  • Post #41 - January 3rd, 2018, 11:41 pm
    Post #41 - January 3rd, 2018, 11:41 pm Post #41 - January 3rd, 2018, 11:41 pm
    I use my microwave at least once a day. I heat milk in it for cocoa and I also cook some veggies like brussel sprouts, and occasionally I will have a frozen dinner which I just did. I also reheat left overs in it.
  • Post #42 - January 4th, 2018, 12:34 am
    Post #42 - January 4th, 2018, 12:34 am Post #42 - January 4th, 2018, 12:34 am
    I like to think I could live without my microwave because I don't use it for any serious cooking tasks. That said, heating up soups, melting butter, etc. are pretty convenient in the microwave. It also occupies a spot in my kitchen that would otherwise be dead space, so I don't have any great incentive to see if I can live without it . . . until it eventually dies.

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #43 - January 4th, 2018, 9:49 am
    Post #43 - January 4th, 2018, 9:49 am Post #43 - January 4th, 2018, 9:49 am
    For about 5 years, I lived without one and opted for a toaster oven taking up the same space. Definitely can live without one but it is a nice convenience to have around
  • Post #44 - January 4th, 2018, 11:09 am
    Post #44 - January 4th, 2018, 11:09 am Post #44 - January 4th, 2018, 11:09 am
    I have a combo convection/microwave that I use daily. I love hot milk in my coffee and I microwave the milk in a small pitcher. The microwave broke recently and I had to heat the milk on the stove-not a big deal, but it took longer and was an annoyance :D I also am a baker and it's convenient to soften butter for recipes and to melt butter and chocolate and heat cream for ganache. But I could live without it...but when my daughter was here with my granddaughter it was used frequently to heat her bottles and her meals.
  • Post #45 - January 4th, 2018, 4:45 pm
    Post #45 - January 4th, 2018, 4:45 pm Post #45 - January 4th, 2018, 4:45 pm
    23 seconds in my microwave warms my Illy espresso cup perfectly. Since I do this c. 4x every morning, the machine is pretty essential in my life! :lol:

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #46 - January 4th, 2018, 11:15 pm
    Post #46 - January 4th, 2018, 11:15 pm Post #46 - January 4th, 2018, 11:15 pm
    I've been about eight years without a microwave present. A good toaster oven does go a long way. I recently got an induction burner and it really speeds things up in the kitchen.
  • Post #47 - January 6th, 2018, 10:25 pm
    Post #47 - January 6th, 2018, 10:25 pm Post #47 - January 6th, 2018, 10:25 pm
    Here at the abode, I would be in serious culinary catastrophe without the microwave oven bought by dad from Polk Bros. on N. Central Ave. in Chicago back in September 1985; a White-Westinghouse KM250HXM-E32906.
    I must let you know that mom's cooking was not very good. :cry: She was quite upset that dad would have even bothered to buy this microwave, but dad was on solid foundation when he did this. (Mom, if they have internet access up there, and you're really perturbed that I've described your food preparation methods on the World-Wide Web, I encourage you to come back down here and settle this with me. - There is a reason a lot of foodstuffs from the late 2000s are still occupying space in kitchen cabinets.)(Who would want this?! Probably not even the Chicago Food Depository.)
    After she died, dad developed a fondness for the Michelina brand's microwave dinners. The shopping trip I made to Food4Less (in June 2015), which likely triggered dad's relocation of his will; I went over the amount I had allocated for shopping because Food4Less had a sale price of those Michelina dinners (particularly the "Popems") from 99¢ to 69¢ - I spontaneously increased the amount of those bought - but dad thought I included the wet cat food from Pet Supplies Plus in the tab. (I did not. The cat food for Mirko went on my credit card bill.) In his contempt, he moved his will from where he had told me it was. :x
    I never did find it. I looked for three months.
    If this microwave ever falters, yes, I will definitely buy a new one.
    Learn what Bing prefers you not know: http://208.84.112.25/~pudgym29/bookmark4.html
  • Post #48 - January 7th, 2018, 11:32 am
    Post #48 - January 7th, 2018, 11:32 am Post #48 - January 7th, 2018, 11:32 am
    Just had a less than 5 year old GE Microwave die (started emitting electrical smoke smell) and- couldn't find a reasonable Microwave Repair person.
    ABT- for-(only) a $95.00 diagnostic fee can examine
    one for ya- but- that's what I wound up paying for a NEW ONE there....
    Seems that our "disposable-culture"- now applies to these devices as well.
    Planned Obsolescence is one huge failure in our Consumer Culture, creating a "real-time" WALL-e experience.
  • Post #49 - January 7th, 2018, 3:49 pm
    Post #49 - January 7th, 2018, 3:49 pm Post #49 - January 7th, 2018, 3:49 pm
    Havent figured out any other way to make my microwave pork rinds. Dont feel like getting a big vat of oil going.

    -Will
  • Post #50 - January 9th, 2018, 1:08 pm
    Post #50 - January 9th, 2018, 1:08 pm Post #50 - January 9th, 2018, 1:08 pm
    I cook most veggies in the microwave instead of steaming or boiling - less heat, often faster, and fewer nutrients leached into surrounding water. The only thing that seems to not work well this way is kale. I do sauté, grill, or roast lots of veggies, and even there the microwave is great for hard veggies I might want to par-cook before roasting or grilling. Cleaning out a dish I've nuked food in also seems easier than cleaning out a pan I've boiled water in (no mineral ring). Of course I could do this without a microwave, but it makes my life a lot easier.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
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    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #51 - January 9th, 2018, 5:44 pm
    Post #51 - January 9th, 2018, 5:44 pm Post #51 - January 9th, 2018, 5:44 pm
    leek wrote:I cook most veggies in the microwave instead of steaming or boiling - less heat, often faster, and fewer nutrients leached into surrounding water. The only thing that seems to not work well this way is kale. I do sauté, grill, or roast lots of veggies, and even there the microwave is great for hard veggies I might want to par-cook before roasting or grilling. Cleaning out a dish I've nuked food in also seems easier than cleaning out a pan I've boiled water in (no mineral ring). Of course I could do this without a microwave, but it makes my life a lot easier.


    i'm with you, leek. except i would NOT want to live without my microwave. i'm sure i use it every day. in addition to vegetables, fish, and poaching chicken for chicken salad among other things, some of you may regret finding out that it's a great way to make caramel (i have an addiction problem with this stuff). check out david lebovitz's website for instructions- it's almost life changing....

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