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Popover Problem

Popover Problem
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    Post #1 - March 13th, 2007, 9:11 am
    Post #1 - March 13th, 2007, 9:11 am Post #1 - March 13th, 2007, 9:11 am
    LTH -- I need your help.

    I've been making popovers for years -- and somehow, something has gone wrong with my methods. And I have no idea how.

    I've used the same recipe for years -- 3 eggs, 1 cup flour, pinch of salt, 1 cup of milk. For years I got lovely puffy popovers. However, lately, my results are horrible. No puffing. Small weird shapes. It's as if my popover mojo had up and vanished.

    I heat the pan in the over first -- then I put melted butter in each little cup -- then I fill the batter up 2/3rds full -- after having rested the batter for a good 5 minutes -- and then i cook for 15 minutes at 450 and turn the heat down to 350 for the next 15.

    The popovers are more like popped in.

    Any help you can offer would be appreciated. I love this treat and I'm sad as sad can be.

    Shannon
  • Post #2 - March 13th, 2007, 9:16 am
    Post #2 - March 13th, 2007, 9:16 am Post #2 - March 13th, 2007, 9:16 am
    Have you calibrated your oven lately? It sounds like you're not getting enough heat.

    Flip
    "Beer is proof God loves us, and wants us to be Happy"
    -Ben Franklin-
  • Post #3 - March 13th, 2007, 9:17 am
    Post #3 - March 13th, 2007, 9:17 am Post #3 - March 13th, 2007, 9:17 am
    The first thing I would do is check the oven temperature with a thermometer. Something might have gone wrong and you could be operating at a much lower temperature than it's reporting.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #4 - March 14th, 2007, 7:15 pm
    Post #4 - March 14th, 2007, 7:15 pm Post #4 - March 14th, 2007, 7:15 pm
    Also, are you possibly using flour that is past its prime? That could contribute to baking problems.
  • Post #5 - March 14th, 2007, 7:47 pm
    Post #5 - March 14th, 2007, 7:47 pm Post #5 - March 14th, 2007, 7:47 pm
    I've given up on popovers with added fat, as much as I like Yorkshire Pudding. Whenever I omit the fat, they work fine. Also, there seems to be a very narrow window for properly filling the muffin cups. Just a a hair too much, and the popover becomes a muffin. Try underfilling the cups a bit. Good luck.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #6 - March 14th, 2007, 8:51 pm
    Post #6 - March 14th, 2007, 8:51 pm Post #6 - March 14th, 2007, 8:51 pm
    Guys, thanks for ideas -- I think I'll pick up an oven thermometer this weekend, just to check the heat but I've done cakes and bread with no problems -- granted, a popover is more delicate creature.

    The flour is an interesting idea. I think the popover problem dates back to using some garden variety flour I picked up a month or so ago -- i usually have King Arthur in the house but it was late, I needed it, couldn't get to Whole Paycheck, that whole thing. I've not had a problem with taste on this though -- the biscuits I've made with this flour are just fine.

    The underfilling isn't an issue with this -- I am always careful not to do that.

    At any rate...i will try again -- I will make a poppy popover, although I think this weekend I'll use the buttermilk and make biscuits instead.
  • Post #7 - March 16th, 2007, 9:01 am
    Post #7 - March 16th, 2007, 9:01 am Post #7 - March 16th, 2007, 9:01 am
    earthlydesire wrote:The underfilling isn't an issue with this -- I am always careful not to do that.

    I was suggesting that the problem can sometimes be overfilling. Anne Willan of La Varenne fame noted in a talk at Ann Arbor that she and her staff had had a lot of muffin-like results when baking popovers under early American kitchen conditions, apparently due to imprecise filling of the cups. She even suggested that the "discovery" of muffins (apparently an American bread form) may have resulted from such a variation. The whole oven temperature regulation thing for an early oven adds another layer of uncertaintly, though.

    Good luck with your biscuits. You might want to check out the current COOK's magazine and try for the flaky result they achieve.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #8 - April 28th, 2007, 10:14 am
    Post #8 - April 28th, 2007, 10:14 am Post #8 - April 28th, 2007, 10:14 am
    Hey guys...

    I bumped this old thread because I think I have solved my popover crisis. I think the problem was length of cooking -- I've been playing with my recipe and I have cut out an egg -- most recipes i looked at only recommend 2 eggs instead of 3 but in general, my recipe seemed sound.

    However...cooking methods varied. Today I tried preheating the pans, buttering the pans and then cooking for 10 minutes at 425 and then clicking it down to 325 for 25 minutes...which did a fabulous job.

    So I think the long slow cooking in a cooler oven seems to be the trick. I've got my popover mojo back!

    shannon
  • Post #9 - April 28th, 2007, 5:20 pm
    Post #9 - April 28th, 2007, 5:20 pm Post #9 - April 28th, 2007, 5:20 pm
    Glad you did decide to revive this, as my last batch of popovers flopped. I will try your technique and report back.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #10 - May 1st, 2007, 8:41 pm
    Post #10 - May 1st, 2007, 8:41 pm Post #10 - May 1st, 2007, 8:41 pm
    I'd like to take a stab at making popovers for Mother's Day. Forgive my ignorance, but do you use a regular muffin pan, or do you use a popover pan? Is there any real difference in the end result? Thanks.
  • Post #11 - May 2nd, 2007, 8:57 am
    Post #11 - May 2nd, 2007, 8:57 am Post #11 - May 2nd, 2007, 8:57 am
    Pucca -- i use a popover pan but only because someone gave me one, long ago -- and actually one of the cups on it has detached itself from the pan -- it's still usable but sort of annoying.

    I think you can use a muffin tin just as easily. They'll just be smaller popovers.

    Josephine -- any luck with the longer baking at the lower temp?
  • Post #12 - December 25th, 2018, 7:58 am
    Post #12 - December 25th, 2018, 7:58 am Post #12 - December 25th, 2018, 7:58 am
    Popover pans put a smile on my face. ~Doesn't take much to make me happy :)

    PopoverP1.jpg Happy holidays all!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - December 26th, 2018, 3:21 am
    Post #13 - December 26th, 2018, 3:21 am Post #13 - December 26th, 2018, 3:21 am
    Cooked our standing rib roast outside, thus no drippings. Rendered down a bit of beef fat trim to cook the popovers.

    Christmas1.jpg Rendered standing rib roast beef fat trim

    Christmas2.jpg Popovers
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #14 - January 1st, 2019, 8:12 pm
    Post #14 - January 1st, 2019, 8:12 pm Post #14 - January 1st, 2019, 8:12 pm
    In desperate straits yesterday, lacking beef fat, I made my Yorkshire puds with bacon grease. Delish. Nobody noticed, everybody enjoyed.

    Note to self.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #15 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:37 am
    Post #15 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:37 am Post #15 - January 3rd, 2019, 9:37 am
    G Wiv wrote:Cooked our standing rib roast outside, thus no drippings. Rendered down a bit of beef fat trim to cook the popovers.

    Christmas1.jpg

    Christmas2.jpg
    those are positively gorgeous!
    "A party without cake is really just a meeting" ~ Julia Child
    "There are only four great arts: music, painting, sculpture, and ornamental pastry." ~ Julia Child
    "Build a Longer Table, NOT a Wall..."

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