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#1
Posted July 9th 2006, 8:12am
Like a lemming, I followed Jim in Logan Square and company to Indianapolis this weekend. My excuse for going is the wedding of my wife’s cousin, but the real reason for the trip is to try out some of the Hoosier Treasures pointed out by Jim and his band of eaters. Before getting to the main event, the food, let me just say that I have had the opportunity during the past 7 days to experience both Northern and Southern culture as it relates to the War. What War you ask? Is there more than one? Sure, we’ve got Iraq, but I’m talking about the War for the Union or the War of Northern Aggression (depending on where you are). Many of us know it as the Civil War. During the last week, I saw both the Soldiers & Sailors Monument in Indianapolis and the Confederate War Memorial in Abbeville, SC (home of the Confederacy). Both honor the soldiers of the American Revolution, the Spanish American War and, of course, the Civil War (from their own regional perspective).

Dueling Monuments
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That’s about as political as I want to get, so now on with the show. On the drive down Friday, I had thoughts of fried chicken in my head as I dreamed about a dinner at Hollyhock Hill, but it was not to be. We called ahead at around 4:30 and all reservations for the night had already been taken. They were booked solid and there was no way we could get in…even if we just showed up, so Hollyhock Hill will have to wait for another trip. Instead we went along with a group of Julie’s cousins to Hellas Café, a Greek restaurant close to our hotel. Hellas was an interesting place, complete with belly dancer and moderately good food. I don’t think it holds a candle to any of the better Greek places in town, but the food was more than passable and the service was friendly and very good.

The Chow Poodle Shows Hellas’ Belly Dancer how to Shake that Thang
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Today I made the pilgrimage past the beautiful mansions on Meridian St. through downtown to the legendary Shapiro’s Deli to see what the fuss is all about.

Shapiro’s
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Upon entering, it is immediately apparent that Shapiro’s is Manny’s Country Cousin. They are both approximately the same vintage (with Shapiro’s being slightly older) and of the same steam table/cafeteria school.

Shapiro’s Interior
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Shapiro’s Steam Table
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I ordered the much vaunted pastrami sandwich, a bowl of matzo ball soup and an iced tea (unsweetened). Although the bill was higher than I though it would be, it wasn’t out of line with what Manny’s charges for the same meal; however it didn’t include a potato pancake like Manny’s would have at that price point. That didn’t matter to me very much, since the reports of Shapiro’s potato pancake have been less than stellar.

Shapiro’s “The Usual”
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The soup was fine. The matzo balls were light and uniform, but tasted as if they were from a mix (not that there is anything wrong with that). The pastrami itself was less garlicky and spicy than the much preferred Manny’s version, but was still pretty good. As has been pointed out elsewhere, it tasted more like flavored brisket than spicy pastrami. I could see why people like this pastrami, but it seemed a bit bland to my taste…perhaps a nod to the Hoosier palate. The bread was very good, though. It is somewhat squishy, but still has enough body to hold up to the meat. The crust was tasty and has a bit of crunch to it. The bread was so good that I ended up buying a loaf to take home with me.

Shapiro’s Pastrami
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My only complaint about the sandwich was that they ask you if you want mustard and put it on the sandwich for you. I prefer to apply my own condiments and I wish I was given the chance, since they overdid it a bit on one half of the sandwich. Also, the meat was room temp rather than hot. Both of these are small quibbles that certainly wouldn’t keep me from returning.

After that great lunch, it was off to the big wedding. The reception was held at The Bridgewater Club, a local country club. Link, from the Mod Squad and his little buddy led the way.

Link Finds Work as a Chauffeur
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Dinner was way above average for country club food (no offense to Evil Ronnie, who is the exception that proves the rule). They served a salad of very fresh mesculin and, for the main course, chicken breast in puff pastry with a layer of duxelles over real mashed potatoes along with some asparagus and a single baby carrot. Surprisingly, this was cooked to perfection. The chicken breast was very moist and the crust was nicely browned and served hot from the oven. The veggies were cooked al dente and not overdone and mushy as one might expect at a banquet.

Country Club Cuisine
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All in all, my trip to Indy was very enjoyable. I wish I had stayed a little longer to be able to check out one of the Hoosier cafeterias that have been talked about, and I would have liked to track down a good piece of pie…and, of course, that visit to Hollyhock Hill still is on my to do list. All that will have to wait for my next visit.

Hollyhock Hill
8110 College Ave.
Indianapolis, IN
317-251-2294

Hellas Café
8501 Westfield Blvd.
Indianapolis, IN
317-702-7171

Shapiro’s Delicatessen
808 S. Meridian St.
Indianapolis, IN
317-631-4041

The Bridgewater Club
3535 East 161st Street
Carmel, Indiana
317-399-2444
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Steve Z.

"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#2
Posted July 9th 2006, 9:41am
stevez wrote:All in all, my trip to Indy was very enjoyable. I wish I had stayed a little longer to be able to check out one of the Hoosier cafeterias that have been talked about,

Steve,

Jim has mentioned leading a Hoosier Cafeteria tour one of these day, I know I'd be on board. My one experience in Indianapolis was brief, from all the wonderful Indy posts it really seems a Midwest Must Do weekend.

Great pics, nice to see Link is back on his feet.

By the way, that Chow Poodle can really shake leg. :)

Enjoy,
Gary
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#3
Posted July 9th 2006, 11:28am
ER works at at city club, no? The food at clubs, country and city, has gotten much better lately thanks to folks like ER. Sort of like hotel and casino food, which has also jumped in quality. Someone figured out that people will pay for good food.
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#4
Posted July 9th 2006, 3:46pm
G Wiv wrote:Jim has mentioned leading a Hoosier Cafeteria tour one of these day, I know I'd be on board. My one experience in Indianapolis was brief, from all the wonderful Indy posts it really seems a Midwest Must Do weekend.


I'd be glad to host such a jaunt, perhaps late summer/early fall? The thing is, however, that there aren't really enough great (versus merely "good") cafeterias left in business to make that an entire theme for such a trip. Sure, MCL is everywhere, but they are really nothing extraordinary. At least, I'd certainly not want to make them a focus of a cafeteria fact-finding tour. As VI would note with chagrin, the best overall chain, Laughners, closed up shop in 2001 (I believe there was something hinky going on that bankrupted the 100-year old family business ... really sad). This leaves Gray Brothers' and Poe's (both actually in Mooresville, southwest of the city) and a couple of other independent, mega-size cafeterias such as Jonathan Byrd's in Greenwood, just south of Indianapolis. Gray Brothers' is the only one of these I have tried (and based on the feedback it gets, it probably would be a good choice if you were only doing one). Any of these would likely be a good place for SteveZ to get his pie fix (although Steve, you missed out on some good pie opportunities at Shapiro's!)

Although I'd like to get others into Shapiro's and/or Hollyhock, of course there is the German and soul food angle, which hopefully Matt986 and his lovely wife are continuing to scout. And of course there is always John's Stews, which I mentioned a couple of days back in the original Indianapolathon thread. So maybe Indianapolathon Mark II can be put together, like I say, late summer or early fall? Who wants to organize this one? :P
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#5
Posted July 9th 2006, 5:58pm
JimInLoganSquare wrote:(although Steve, you missed out on some good pie opportunities at Shapiro's!)


I was hoping for pie or some other desert at Shapiros, but honestly the selection didn't do anything for me. Nothing looked all that fresh. Maybe the selection during the week would have looked better.
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Steve Z.

"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#6
Posted July 9th 2006, 6:03pm
stevez wrote:
JimInLoganSquare wrote:(although Steve, you missed out on some good pie opportunities at Shapiro's!)


I was hoping for pie or some other desert at Shapiros, but honestly the selection didn't do anything for me. Nothing looked all that fresh. Maybe the selection during the week would have looked better.


That's too bad, and also funny -- during our visit on a recent Saturday, Mrs. JiLS noted with some amusement the cranky demand from the "boss" for the crew to "bring more rhubarb pie, now!" about 10 seconds after Mrs. JiLS took the last slice on display ... and indeed, the supply was replenished shortly. Maybe the "boss" had the day off? :wink:
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#7
Posted July 9th 2006, 6:45pm
stevez wrote:Upon entering, it is immediately apparent that Shapiro’s is Manny’s Country Cousin. They are both approximately the same vintage (with Shapiro’s being slightly older) and of the same steam table/cafeteria school.


A minor point, but worth noting: Although the current visible structure is, indeed, of a vintage on a par with Manny's, Shapiro's has been operating at this location since 1905. The original, 101-year old structure is long gone (although the support columns visible in the current dining room are the remains of the original building's outline, and I suppose if you cut into them, you'd find the circa-1905 cast-iron originals). So, "Country Cousin" or no, Shapiro's is definitely not of the same vintage as Manny's -- and in fact had been serving up groceries and lunches to the heavily Eastern-European Jewish population of pre-war southside Indianapolis for around 40 years when Manny's first opened its doors. Of course, Philco made the first television, too, and look at where that got them. I'm not trying to make an argument that older means better; but to the extent folks care, Shapiro's is a much older operation than Manny's. A Capsule History of Shapiro's
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#8
Posted July 10th 2006, 3:59pm
JimInLoganSquare wrote:
stevez wrote:Upon entering, it is immediately apparent that Shapiro’s is Manny’s Country Cousin. They are both approximately the same vintage (with Shapiro’s being slightly older) and of the same steam table/cafeteria school.


A minor point, but worth noting: Although the current visible structure is, indeed, of a vintage on a par with Manny's, Shapiro's has been operating at this location since 1905. The original, 101-year old structure is long gone (although the support columns visible in the current dining room are the remains of the original building's outline, and I suppose if you cut into them, you'd find the circa-1905 cast-iron originals). So, "Country Cousin" or no, Shapiro's is definitely not of the same vintage as Manny's -- and in fact had been serving up groceries and lunches to the heavily Eastern-European Jewish population of pre-war southside Indianapolis for around 40 years when Manny's first opened its doors. Of course, Philco made the first television, too, and look at where that got them. I'm not trying to make an argument that older means better; but to the extent folks care, Shapiro's is a much older operation than Manny's. A Capsule History of Shapiro's


yeah, was going to say, Shapiro's served a urban Jewish demographic 40 years before Manny's was open... so maybe it's country by virtue of being in a smaller city, but there is absolutely nothing "country" about a 100 year-old Jewish Deli that sits downtown in a city of 1.7 million people.

Anyway, I'll take both Shapiro's and Katzinger's (Columbus, OH) over anything Chicago has to offer in terms of Pastrami or Corned Beef. Maybe it is Manny's Country Grandfather...
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#9
Posted July 10th 2006, 4:57pm
ab wrote:yeah, was going to say, Shapiro's served a urban Jewish demographic 40 years before Manny's was open... so maybe it's country by virtue of being in a smaller city, but there is absolutely nothing "country" about a 100 year-old Jewish Deli that sits downtown in a city of 1.7 million people.


Let's not get carried away, here; Steve's "Country Cousin" quote was intended to be funny and evocative (both of which it is). But the pithy quote should not be taken out of context of the thorough and balanced descriptions in the body of Steve's post. Otherwise, the tail would certainly be wagging the dog and, moreover, Steve wouldn't have bothered to write the rest of his post if that's all he thought of the place. I certainly don't take any offense at the "Country Cousin" label. But to help set the record straight for those who don't already know much about Shapiro's or Manny's, I thought some history would be helpful to put things in context.

(Also, ab, and this is really getting trivial, but you've just about doubled the population of Indianapolis! :P The city proper is home to around 800,000; I think if you count the balance of Marion County plus collar counties as part of the metro area, you get around 1.2 million or maybe a few more.)
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#10
Posted July 10th 2006, 6:24pm
JimInLoganSquare wrote:I certainly don't take any offense at the "Country Cousin" label.


There is no offense to be taken. AB, Country Cousin is a term of endearment to indicate the kinship (in style and substance) between Manny's and Shapiro's. They are two of a kind. Two peas in a kosher-style pod. Kissin' Cousins, if you will. Country Cousin is a reference to the size and location of Indianapolis. I could have just as easily said that Manny's is the City Cousin of Shapiro's, but it just didn't have that ring. :wink:

I forgot that is is sometimes necessary to completely explain everything written on LTH lest the subtlety not be unsubtle enough.
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"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#11
Posted July 11th 2006, 11:24am
stevez wrote:
JimInLoganSquare wrote:I certainly don't take any offense at the "Country Cousin" label.


There is no offense to be taken. AB, Country Cousin is a term of endearment to indicate the kinship (in style and substance) between Manny's and Shapiro's. They are two of a kind. Two peas in a kosher-style pod. Kissin' Cousins, if you will. Country Cousin is a reference to the size and location of Indianapolis. I could have just as easily said that Manny's is the City Cousin of Shapiro's, but it just didn't have that ring. :wink:

I forgot that is is sometimes necessary to completely explain everything written on LTH lest the subtlety not be unsubtle enough.


I hear ya... just painful seeing Shapiro's being compared to the inferior Manny's :)

JILS: Metro Indy Pop: 1,687, 486 fyi (2006 estimate), 1,607,486 (2000 census)
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#12
Posted July 11th 2006, 1:24pm
ab wrote:JILS: Metro Indy Pop: 1,687, 486 fyi (2006 estimate), 1,607,486 (2000 census)


Not sure of your source, ab, but keep in mind, "Metro Indy" means a lot more than just the City of Indianapolis; it includes an entire nine-county area. The city itself lays claim to just under half of the Metro population -- much like Chicago compared to its collar counties. 800,000 or so in the City of Indianapolis (which sprawls over an area of about 400 square miles), 800,000 or so more spread over an area of approximately 3,200 square miles (the 8 counties surrounding Marion County).
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#13
Posted July 11th 2006, 2:28pm
ab wrote:just painful seeing Shapiro's being compared to the inferior Manny's :)


I'd have to dispute that claim in the strongest possible way. I think the places are different, but both good. The food at Shipiro's was a bit bland for my palate. Even the rye bread had a distinctive soft white bread quality to it. For that reason (along with the reasons stated in the Manny's GNR Award thread), I much prefer Manny's, but I've got nothing against Shapiro's, either.
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"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#14
Posted July 11th 2006, 2:53pm
stevez wrote:
ab wrote:just painful seeing Shapiro's being compared to the inferior Manny's :)


I'd have to dispute that claim in the strongest possible way. I think the places are different, but both good. The food at Shipiro's was a bit bland for my palate. Even the rye bread had a distinctive soft white bread quality to it. For that reason (along with the reasons stated in the Manny's GNR Award thread), I much prefer Manny's, but I've got nothing against Shapiro's, either.


Steve, excellent (if really unnecessary) explanation (I thought this came through clearly enough in your original post). HOWEVER, I have to say that it's a dangerous game you and ab are playing, to evaluate restaurants based on personal taste -- which is really just "kissing cousins" with personal opinion. Nobody agrees on opinions, so I propose, going forward, that we should maintain greater objectivity on this site to avoid confusion and consternation among the participants. Accordingly, I am going to limit all my future posts (and ask that others do likewise) to listing the name of the restaurant plus key demographics of the city or town in which the restaurant is located, as verified through Google searches. Steve and ab, I recognize this approach will be difficult for many, at first; but eventually, I am certain all will recognize its wisdom. Whadda ya say? :)
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#15
Posted July 11th 2006, 5:54pm
JimInLoganSquare wrote: Accordingly, I am going to limit all my future posts (and ask that others do likewise) to listing the name of the restaurant plus key demographics of the city or town in which the restaurant is located, as verified through Google searches. Steve and ab, I recognize this approach will be difficult for many, at first; but eventually, I am certain all will recognize its wisdom. Whadda ya say? :)


I say this is tedious and I'm tired of it. I went to Indianapolis. I ate at Shapiro's. It was pretty good. I like Manny's better, but I don't dislike Shapiro's either. I don't give a flying fig who lives in Indy or how many of then there are. It's still a small town compared to where I live (that's neither good nor bad. It just is). If you are ever there, go to Shapiro's if you want to. That's all I have to say in a nutshell. Now you can discuss this post to death if you want to.
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"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#16
Posted July 11th 2006, 6:18pm
stevez wrote:
JimInLoganSquare wrote: Accordingly, I am going to limit all my future posts (and ask that others do likewise) to listing the name of the restaurant plus key demographics of the city or town in which the restaurant is located, as verified through Google searches. Steve and ab, I recognize this approach will be difficult for many, at first; but eventually, I am certain all will recognize its wisdom. Whadda ya say? :)


I say this is tedious and I'm tired of it. I went to Indianapolis. I ate at Shapiro's. It was pretty good. I like Manny's better, but I don't dislike Shapiro's either. I don't give a flying fig who lives in Indy or how many of then there are. It's still a small town compared to where I live (that's neither good nor bad. It just is). If you are ever there, go to Shapiro's if you want to. That's all I have to say in a nutshell. Now you can discuss this post to death if you want to.


Steve, you said it, and I agree. I don't think that there was anything ambiguous with your initial post, or that there is anything inconsistent between your first post and your last or any in between. I thought I was clear about that, but then I went too far. For what it's worth, my last post was intended to be a joke at my own expense, acknowledging the snowballing juggernaut of tedium I had myself initiated by baiting ab (and to a lesser extent, you) on the "country vs. city cousin" and population statistics, with a facetious suggestion that I thought that sort of discussion of population trivia is a GOOD focus for a food forum. To be clear: It is not, and I was being ironic (if not as funny as I had hoped). Sorry to you, Steve, as well as ab and all others reading this thread who were unamused.
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#17
Posted April 1st 2009, 10:08pm
We're headed to Cincy to visit the folks and decided that we'd have a more pleasant time if we stopped in Indianapolis for a night on the way there and on the way back - Sparky doesn't even remember the Children's Museum, it's been so long - and we managed to snag a room near the zoo, which we've never been to.

At any rate, we'll be having a couple breakfasts and hopefully a lunch. I'm looking over the thread, but if anybody wants to toss an idea my way, let me know (Jiminlogansquare, you know what I'm looking for)
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#18
Posted April 2nd 2009, 8:09am
Mhays wrote:We're headed to Cincy to visit the folks and decided that we'd have a more pleasant time if we stopped in Indianapolis for a night on the way there and on the way back - Sparky doesn't even remember the Children's Museum, it's been so long - and we managed to snag a room near the zoo, which we've never been to.

At any rate, we'll be having a couple breakfasts and hopefully a lunch. I'm looking over the thread, but if anybody wants to toss an idea my way, let me know (Jiminlogansquare, you know what I'm looking for)
Shapiro's. Shapiro's. Shapiro's.
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is making all his reservations under the name Steve Plotnicki from now on.
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#19
Posted April 2nd 2009, 9:35am
Mhays wrote:(Jiminlogansquare, you know what I'm looking for)


Michelle - Can you let the rest of us know what you're "looking for"? I'd be happy to help if I can.
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#20
Posted April 2nd 2009, 9:46am
jpschust wrote:Shapiro's. Shapiro's. Shapiro's.


Are there three? I thought there were only two, way up North across from the hospital, and downtown near the Hoosierdome.
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#21
Posted April 2nd 2009, 9:49am
Mhays wrote:At any rate, we'll be having a couple breakfasts and hopefully a lunch. I'm looking over the thread, but if anybody wants to toss an idea my way, let me know (Jiminlogansquare, you know what I'm looking for)
If you'll be in town on a weekday, I'd recommend
R-Bistro for a good lunch, or late (11:00) breakfast.
http://www.rbistro.com/menu/
They have a house-made corned beef hash with
poached eggs and fried potatoes, and their version
of a BLT (apple wood smoked bacon, watercress, avocado
and tomato chutney) is very tasty. And their Sticky Toffee
Pudding is incredible, kinda like a moist, dense, spicy bread
pudding (and it's only available @ lunch). (This week's dinner
menu also looks strong, in particular the desserts).
Breakfast downtown is pretty weak. One pretty good
bet is City Cafe, a few blocks north of Monument Circle
@ 443 N. Pennsylvania - serving up a corned beef hash of
chunky meat and potatoes, and some of the best fresh
cinnamon rolls I've had. Personally, I'd hop in the car and
drive north to the Broad Ripple neighborhood and try cafe
Petite Chou (823 E Westfield Blvd) - for fresh croissants/
pan au chocolat and a ratatouille crepe, then a stroll around
the village (picking up some fresh carmel nut crunch popcorn
@ Just Pop In) http://www.justpopinonline.com/
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#22
Posted April 2nd 2009, 10:10am
Another lunch option is to grab a few sandwiches
at Goose - The Market, http://www.goosethemarket.com/store.htm
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then stroll around the grounds of the IMA (Indy Museum of Art);
there's a little lake/pond tucked away out back with plenty of
bird watching (saw several pileated wookpeckers a couple weeks ago).
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#23
Posted April 2nd 2009, 12:07pm
Thanks, guys! All very good recs!
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#24
Posted April 2nd 2009, 3:36pm
L'ex ist kaput, unfortunately

Shapiros: a must do! really

Biscuits: secure behind the shell of the defunct Broadripple Sunflower...still great service...still good for cod-Mexican breakfast alternatives...the chicken chilaquiles rawk

Thai Spice in Greenwood...the best Thai in the Indy diaspora(akin to Chicago's better Ameri-Thai...Opart/Rosded/Amarit)

SOBRO Patachou: I'm always happy with the omelet du jour...nothing to bowl one over, just well-executed fare
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#25
Posted April 2nd 2009, 4:15pm
Christopher Gordon wrote:Thai Spice in Greenwood...the best Thai in the Indy diaspora

The same folks run Siam Square in Fountain Square.
Tasty samosa-like curry puffs.
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#26
Posted April 7th 2009, 7:08pm
OK, take two - first post got eaten in one of those "cheese, I should have cut-and-pasted it" accidents! At any rate, thanks to everyone who tossed out ideas - I wish we had been able to get to more of them! What we did learn is that there's a lot to do in Indy with a school-age kid - certainly plenty of reason for a return visit in the near future. We got stuck for well over an hour in the not-at-all advertised road construction on 65 between Indiana State Road 2 and State Road 10 (essentially, between Lowell and DeMotte) and had stopped at Barbara Ann's on the way out, so we went right to bed instead of having a second dinner. Next morning, ravenous after a swim in the hotel pool, we headed to Shapiro's - it was frighteningly quiet, even for a Saturday morning, but I realized after we were there for a while that it's really more of a lunch place. It's nice to see an old-timey cafeteria, one that serves real food and not made-from-a-mix glop. I wish, wish, wish I had been brave enough to get a picture of the zeyde gathering up his belongings with a pickle in his mouth. Someday I hope to be that kind of grandma.

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Breakfasts and sandwiches are ordered a la carte, so the 'spouse got the lox plate, Sparky opted for French toast - while I spied the "biscuits and beef gravy," which to my near-Kentuckian upbringing meant pot roast gravy over biscuits. I queried "do you have sausage gravy?" to which the cashier responded firmly "we don't have no pork products at all." I wound up with this amusingly traefy plate of beef sausage swimming in cream:

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Not the ultimate B&G, but a very good version - the gravy only lacking porkfat goodness to make it perfect, the biscuits respectable and fresh. The spouse's lox plate had quite a lot of fish with an airy bagel - a bagel channeling its inner English muffin. Sparky's french toast was much larger than this picture would have you believe, and he ate every last bit.

Image Image

We then headed to Cincinnati overnight to visit relatives, and came back earlier than we'd planned to on Sunday (after I was chided by both JimInLoganSquare and stevez for not making time to go to Hollyhock Hill) After a stop at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum (definitely worth the price - $6 gets you admission AND a lap around the track in a narrated tourbus) we made our way through the downpour.
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While I've never visited Hollyhock Hill before, I've eaten at this restaurant many times, just not all at the same time. Restaurants of this type abound in the Southern Ohio/Northern Kentucky area - some of them are even in historic locations, and some even offer whitewashed interiors punctuated by flowery murals and wallpaper. None of them offer as complete a package as this one: the dining room is manned by pinafore-wearing women (I think I saw one male server in an apron) and the family-style food is either seasoned with pork fat or with a subtle whiff of allspice and nutmeg. You might find a similar experience at the Golden Lamb in Ohio, or at Shakertown in Berea, Ky - but the food won't quite be as good. The 'spouse was reminded of "every dinner I had in Henderson (KY.)" For those of us who don't have an Aunt Jimmie Lou, Hollyhock Hill is worth the trip. While I'm always on the prowl for chicken that tastes like chicken, I'll take chicken that tastes like bacon any day! In my book, it could have been a bit more crisp (recognizing that this style doesn't have the same crunch of commercial fried chicken,) but we ate heartily and had an excellent cold lunch of leftovers when we visited the Children's Museum the next day.

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#27
Posted April 7th 2009, 7:54pm
Cabbagehead wrote:
jpschust wrote:Shapiro's. Shapiro's. Shapiro's.


Are there three? I thought there were only two, way up North across from the hospital, and downtown near the Hoosierdome.


There's actually only one worth considering. The one up North is a Suburban-Disneyesque version of Shapiros. It's got none of the atmosphere or soul of the original downtown location.
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#28
Posted April 8th 2009, 6:31am
stevez wrote:
Cabbagehead wrote:
jpschust wrote:Shapiro's. Shapiro's. Shapiro's.


Are there three? I thought there were only two, way up North across from the hospital, and downtown near the Hoosierdome.


There's actually only one worth considering. The one up North is a Suburban-Disneyesque version of Shapiros. It's got none of the atmosphere or soul of the original downtown location.
Agreed on no atmosphere or soul, but the food is a perfect replication, strangely enough the one in the Indy airport is a perfect replication as well.
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is making all his reservations under the name Steve Plotnicki from now on.
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#29
Posted June 2nd 2010, 9:28am
On the way to and from Lexington, KY for a Memorial Day road trip, we stopped at Hollyhock Hill and Shapiro's.

On Friday, we called ahead and dined al trunko on a half chicken and biscuits from Hollyhock. If this chicken was closer to home, I'd certainly be a regular. Light and crispy crust with well cooked chicken inside. Before tasting, I was a little disappointed that I had no hot sauce with me, but it wasn't needed. Great chicken.

On Monday, we stopped at Shapiro's for a quick sandwich and were pleased with the pastrami. To me, Shapiro's is a vast upgrade over most close to the highway food in the area, but is not a big upgrade over Manny's.
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#30
Posted June 5th 2010, 9:55pm
Staying out on the fringes of Indy tonight, we found Jockamo's Upper Crust pizza. Pretty darn good
http://www.jockamopizza.com/
5646 Washington St.
Indianapolis IN 46219
317-356-6612

Breadsticks: served with dipping sauces (hummos and parmesan for us, other options include "pizza sauce", alfredo). Texture was a little too much like a Domino's style breadstick, but otherwise tasty.

Salads: dressings are homemade except for "Lite" dressings. The garlic is very much like a thinner version of Dave's Italian Kitchen, so that puts it high on my list. Creamy Gorgonzola was also tasty. House salad has several cheeses and diced cukes and tomatoes. $3.25 isn't terribly steep for a side salad these days.

We spit a Thai Chicken pizza, the daily special. Not particularly similar to California Pizza Kitchen -- smoked gouda cheese added some nice flavors.

Overall liked the place very much, would definitely go back.
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What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
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