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More Time in Wisconsin

More Time in Wisconsin
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  • More Time in Wisconsin

    Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 10:54 am
    Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 10:54 am Post #1 - March 15th, 2005, 10:54 am
    We were driving from Oconomowoc to Oak Park on Sunday. After extensive research, it was decided that it was only to Milwaukee that we would get decent chow. The first and last place that came to mind for Milwaukee, the place I most want to try in the land of butter was the Jewish deli, Jake's. A quick check on the chow hot-line, however, educated me of no Jake-y's on Sundays. We ended at Mader's, which was the choice all a long of the Condiment Queen. Later, we arrived too late for hot ham and buns (PLEASE EXPLAIN!) but had an early dinner of burgers and custard at Omega. We finished the day with some shopping at Woodman's in Kenosha. Wisconsin remains a great chow state.

    We pulled into Mader's lot around 1 PM and were initially disappointed to learn it was buffet. By the end of the meal we realized this was an intensely good deal. The buffet encompasses most of the Mader menu. More aptly put, most of the Mader's menu is no different from what is on the buffet. In other words, if you ordered sausage or sauerbraten, it's coming from the same holding cell regardless of whether you can see it. Same thing with appetizers of various Usinger meats. There are little secrets on this buffet. Which means it is food that works very well on the buffet. Fat brats and even fatter knockwursts in an onion broth, goulash that tasted almost of Texas chile and kessler ribs with sauerkraut all went down well with my New Glarus Spotted Cow beer. Before these hot meats, I ate a bunch of Milwaukee cold cuts, some herring and a big portion of smoked coho salmon--how can they get that in Wisconsin? Roast beef stood up amazingly well to the heat lamp but dessert were like school food--sheet cakes with plain frostings.

    We parked between Glorioso Brothers and Peter Sciortino's Bakery on Brady Street, just north of downtown Milwaukee, both advertising hot ham and fresh buns, only to find both places just closed for the day. Must come earlier to find out. So, we wandered the shops a bit, later getting one of the most over-extracted espressos I have ever tasted at Anodyne. We got a bum lead on a custard place that turned out to be Cold Stone Creamery!!! Around 5ish, we started south on in Rt. 32, passing through some more of Milwaukee's frozen in time neighborhoods, also got to drive right up to a lake freighter, something you cannot do in Chicago. We decided to stop at the Milwaukee chain Omega for custard and burgers.

    Omega is just the place to have handy on a Sunday evening. Nothing extraordinary. No gobs of butter on the burger, just a discreet swipe on the soft bun, yet the burger had that real taste I also associate with Fatburger or In'n Out. Again, the custard was not extraordinary yet real tasting. It fortified us to wander Woodman's.

    A few years ago, there was some debate on Chowhound on whether Woodman's was a great store or just a big store. I would say that for a long time on Sunday night, I was in the big, just big category. As has been noted, the store is claustrophobic, poorly organized and filled with a lot of just stuff. The produce is cheap but seemed on the verge of spoilage (similar to Stanley's in Chicago), and granted it was Sunday night, but the bakery stuff did not impress--hey if I skipped the kringle you know it is not so impressive. Still, the longer I wandered Woodman's, the more it grew on me. Within all those miles of shelves are tons of Wisconsin products, all those honeys and door county preserves and summer sausages and cheese spreads but always a few dollars less than at the specialty shops. We spent a while ruminating over which Wisconsin mustards to take home. Of course, there was the Tenuta's giardinaras, and we bought a jar of the finely diced mix. The selection of Usinger and Klements sausage was huge. Most interesting to me was a range of wild caught smoked fishes from different Wisconsin providers. In addition to the more common chubs and whitefish, there was smoked blue fish, smoke lake (i.e., larger) trout and even smoked carp. Woodman's is well worth the time even if it is not a great store.

    [All addresses Milwaukee unless stated otherwise]

    Jake's Deli - 1634 North

    Mader's - 1041 N Old World 3rd St

    Glorioso Brothers 1020 East Brady Street.

    Peter Sciortino's Bakery 1101 E. Brady Street

    Anodyne Coffee Roasting Co. 1208 E. Brady Street

    Omega Custard and Burgers - 32 and Kinnickinnic

    Woodman's - Just off of Highway 50 and I-94, Kenosha
  • Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 1:04 pm
    Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 1:04 pm Post #2 - March 15th, 2005, 1:04 pm
    Organization has never been one of Woodman's great qualities. The newer stores tend to be layed-out pretty well. The one in Kenosha is poorly designed. However, the WORST is the mothership store in Janesville, WI. I hate to go in there as I get completely lost and disorganized.

    We buy a lot of meat there as they tend to offer ground chuck/round for 0.99/lb in the discount bin. Also, the smoked fish is both pretty goos and a lot cheaper than the other options.

    The bakery portion has a lot of offerings but the quality is somewhat suspect from some of the smaller Wisconsin bakeries. In Carpentersville, they are starting to source from Chicago bakeries but nothing spectacular - YET.
  • Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 1:31 pm
    Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 1:31 pm Post #3 - March 15th, 2005, 1:31 pm
    FWIW, I used to do some business with Phil Woodman. He had his own opinions about how to do everything, and he wasn't shy about telling anyone in earshot what was right.
  • Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 2:02 pm
    Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 2:02 pm Post #4 - March 15th, 2005, 2:02 pm
    Having been in Madison for a year now, I must say I certainly apprecate Woodman's for certain things...grapeseed oil and oil-cured pitted olives at shocking low prices are the two that leap to mind...but am occasionally frustrated at the things they DON'T sell...unsalted butter, for instance. :roll: It turns every grocery run into kind of a scavenger hunt, though.
  • Post #5 - March 15th, 2005, 6:38 pm
    Post #5 - March 15th, 2005, 6:38 pm Post #5 - March 15th, 2005, 6:38 pm
    Don't know if this is the case at all Woodman's, but, the Kenosha store doesn't sell any Nueske products. I have become quite a fan of them, and I was surprised that a store of that size didn't stock a single one.Makes me wonder if the legendary Phil Woodman tried to put the "squeeze" on them and they didn't bite.

    I concur---The best way to describe the place is "semi-organized chaos"

    My 2 cents----
  • Post #6 - March 15th, 2005, 6:44 pm
    Post #6 - March 15th, 2005, 6:44 pm Post #6 - March 15th, 2005, 6:44 pm
    cito wrote:Don't know if this is the case at all Woodman's, but, the Kenosha store doesn't sell any Nueske products. I have become quite a fan of them, and I was surprised that a store of that size didn't stock a single one.Makes me wonder if the legendary Phil Woodman tried to put the "squeeze" on them and they didn't bite.

    I concur---The best way to describe the place is "semi-organized chaos"

    My 2 cents----


    I was surprised too to find no Nueske stuff. There were, however, some other Wisconsin bacons. You know, I was looking at some Nueske stuff on one of my last Wisconsin runs, and the ingredients did not look that "slow" so to speak. Is Nueske really that artisinal anyway, or just a good name?

    Rob
  • Post #7 - March 15th, 2005, 7:27 pm
    Post #7 - March 15th, 2005, 7:27 pm Post #7 - March 15th, 2005, 7:27 pm
    Vital Information wrote:I was surprised too to find no Nueske stuff. There were, however, some other Wisconsin bacons. You know, I was looking at some Nueske stuff on one of my last Wisconsin runs, and the ingredients did not look that "slow" so to speak. Is Nueske really that artisinal anyway, or just a good name?


    I'm a big fan of Nueske bacon. They had a small write up in Saveur--here is a quote:

    "Today, Nueske's Hillcrest Farm cures and smokes a whole line of ham, poultry, and sausage. But the bacon - smoky-sweet and lean - is the real cash cow. Robert's sons Jim and Bob, who took over in 1976, attribute the bacon's exceptional flavor to 24 hours of smoking time (commercial bacon is smoked for about five hours) over an open fire of applewood logs (instead of with smoke from the applewood sawdust that many of their competitors use). Since most of the fat is rendered in the smokehouse, Nueske's bacon doesn't shrink like other brands when cooked."

    And their not nitrite free, but their levels are very low compared to USDA standards. FWIW.
  • Post #8 - March 15th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Post #8 - March 15th, 2005, 7:34 pm Post #8 - March 15th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    trixie-pea wrote:
    Vital Information wrote:I was surprised too to find no Nueske stuff. There were, however, some other Wisconsin bacons. You know, I was looking at some Nueske stuff on one of my last Wisconsin runs, and the ingredients did not look that "slow" so to speak. Is Nueske really that artisinal anyway, or just a good name?


    I'm a big fan of Nueske bacon. They had a small write up in Saveur--here is a quote:

    "Today, Nueske's Hillcrest Farm cures and smokes a whole line of ham, poultry, and sausage. But the bacon - smoky-sweet and lean - is the real cash cow. Robert's sons Jim and Bob, who took over in 1976, attribute the bacon's exceptional flavor to 24 hours of smoking time (commercial bacon is smoked for about five hours) over an open fire of applewood logs (instead of with smoke from the applewood sawdust that many of their competitors use). Since most of the fat is rendered in the smokehouse, Nueske's bacon doesn't shrink like other brands when cooked."

    And their not nitrite free, but their levels are very low compared to USDA standards. FWIW.


    Thanks!
  • Post #9 - March 15th, 2005, 7:41 pm
    Post #9 - March 15th, 2005, 7:41 pm Post #9 - March 15th, 2005, 7:41 pm
    Rob:

    How much did you pay for the Mader buffet? If I can try a range of items, then it may be a decent deal.

    I agree Woodman's has a broad range of items. Did you find the potato chips from Rockford? I start to get frustrated at Jewel and Dominicks when I cannot find stuff in their stores I know are at Woodmans. Fortunately, I am up in northern Lake County enough to make it a side trip.

    nr706 wrote:FWIW, I used to do some business with Phil Woodman. He had his own opinions about how to do everything, and he wasn't shy about telling anyone in earshot what was right.


    Phil would fit in well with the LTHforum crowd, wouldn't he? :lol:
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - March 15th, 2005, 9:12 pm
    Post #10 - March 15th, 2005, 9:12 pm Post #10 - March 15th, 2005, 9:12 pm
    Cathy2, I believe the price for the buffet was $15 for adults and $8 for kidz. An excellent way to enjoy the place.

    We did not wander Woodman's enough to see the chip selection. Aside from the section with condiments (of course, right), we did not go down most of the packaged good aisles.

    To re-iterate what I said above, for me, I thought Woodman's an excellent source for various Wisconsin products, and I would return for such stuff. I am not sure I would wanna do "regular" shopping there.

    Rob
  • Post #11 - March 16th, 2005, 11:09 pm
    Post #11 - March 16th, 2005, 11:09 pm Post #11 - March 16th, 2005, 11:09 pm
    Vital Information wrote: A quick check on the chow hot-line, however, educated me of no Jake-y's on Sundays.


    Jake's is also closed on monday's. On Saturday night I was notified by my employer that I would be needed up here in milwaukee for the week. So I scurried to gather some spots for my chow "to-do" list .

    Of course Jake's was on top of my list and I actually headed over there as soon as I hit town monday, even before checking in to my hotel. As I was peering into the window in the locked door a passer by took the time to tell me "jakes aint open on monday". (one thing about milwaukee, it seems as friendly as a small town). On to plan B and #2 on the list, Speed Queen BBQ.


    At Speed Queen I had the outisde shoulder dinner ($9.53) with SOS (speed queen speak for sauce on side). It was a huge portion, likely 1/2 pound of very moist and flavorful pork shoulder. I have to agree with other tasters that you should pass on the mild sauce and go for the hot style. it has a very unique and interesting flavor and is a good condiment for the BBQ. And it really isnt THAT hot. I could not finish the portion and took 1/2 the order back to my hotel with me for later consumption. I grabbed a takeout menu and am sorry I wont be here on saturday when they have breakfast with such offerings as salmon croquettes (6.93) ,fried ribs? (7.99) and baked omelet (5.24)
    I know others have said that the actual BBQ is about the same as they could make at home. I would have to admit it is a couple notches better that what I can make at home and was every bit as good as my dear departed Edith's BBQ on Clybourn.

    On Tuesday I finally made it to Jakes. There is another thread on LTH with pictures of Jakes and the writers have done an exceptional job of capturing the place. I suggest doing a search of LTH and finding it. The place was crowded with 5 tables of diners and another 8 people waiting for take out. I had the corned beef on rye and a root beer (7.50 total)
    The portion is not as large as Manny's , but the CB to me is every bit as good. Personally I prefer my rye sliced a little thicker. But neither of these places really knocked my socks off like Bravermans used to.

    So, my personal hot corned beef king will still remain Elliots Dairy at nagle and gunnison in chicago. Hot CB sliced before your eyes to go for about 8.00/lb (note that jakes CB by the pound is now over 17.00) I think I may have mentioned them before and frankly am puzzled that nobody ever mentions Elliots. Is it because you have tried it and didnt like it or just have never gotten around to trying it?

    Tomorrow some members of my team want to try Safe House. Have any of you ever been? Any good recs there? The place seems a little gimmicky to me but since I am a team player I will go with the flow on this one.

    Bob
    Bob Kopczynski
    http://www.maxwellstreetmarket.com
    "Best Deals in Town"
  • Post #12 - March 16th, 2005, 11:20 pm
    Post #12 - March 16th, 2005, 11:20 pm Post #12 - March 16th, 2005, 11:20 pm
    bob kopczynski wrote:Tomorrow some members of my team want to try Safe House. Have any of you ever been? Any good recs there? The place seems a little gimmicky to me but since I am a team player I will go with the flow on this one.


    Yep, it's gimmicky all right. We took about 20 minutes to walk around the place, I probably drank a beer in that time, and got the hell out of there. If you're with a big group of people who are into it, I imagine the experience would be more enjoyable. Also, if it's not too late, I would suggest not reading up on the place too much beforehand. I might have appreciated more of their schtick if it didn't match what I'd read so precisely.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #13 - March 17th, 2005, 11:55 am
    Post #13 - March 17th, 2005, 11:55 am Post #13 - March 17th, 2005, 11:55 am
    bob kopczynski wrote:So, my personal hot corned beef king will still remain Elliots Dairy at nagle and gunnison in chicago. Hot CB sliced before your eyes to go for about 8.00/lb (note that jakes CB by the pound is now over 17.00) I think I may have mentioned them before and frankly am puzzled that nobody ever mentions Elliots. Is it because you have tried it and didnt like it or just have never gotten around to trying it?


    Bob


    I am not sure about the best (after all, I have not been to Jake's), but I do too love Elliot's. In fact, just two nights ago, I ate Elliott's corned beef for dinner. Of course, there is always the problem of actually eating it hot, and I seldom do what I have seen other customers to, eat it in their car. Elliott's also makes very good turkey and roast beef (at very low prices), although the rest of the store is so-so. Anyone ever try their pies?

    And getting back to Wisconsin, does ANYONE know the story of the Sunday ham/buns thing?

    Rob
  • Post #14 - March 17th, 2005, 12:01 pm
    Post #14 - March 17th, 2005, 12:01 pm Post #14 - March 17th, 2005, 12:01 pm
    Bob,

    In the general Safehouse neck of the woods, I would give Elsa's On the Park a try. It's a more upscale bar that also serves food. If you're a single malt fan, they have a wonderful selection.

    Another favorite of mine is Turner Hall. They do an awesome Friday fish fry, but everything else I've had there has been very good. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places, so if you don't have the time or inclination to eat there, it makes for an interesting place just to stop and have a beer. The bar area is gorgeous.

    As far as German food, I've just never been a big Mader's fan. IMHO Karl Ratzsch's food is better and the atmosphere is nicer. Again, just my opinion because I know there are lots of folks who are loyal to Mader's.

    Enjoy!

    Elsa's On the Park
    833 N. Jefferson St.
    Milwaukee, WI 53201
    414-765-0615

    Historic Turner Restaurant
    1034 N 4th St
    Milwaukee, WI 53203
    414-276-4844

    Karl Ratzsch's
    320 E. Mason St.
    Milwaukee, WI 53202
    414-276-2720
  • Post #15 - March 17th, 2005, 12:02 pm
    Post #15 - March 17th, 2005, 12:02 pm Post #15 - March 17th, 2005, 12:02 pm
    I don't know what the story is. However, I do know that the Pic-n-Save in Delavan on US-14 gives you free 6 pack of buns if you buy a ham on Sundays. It seems like a local custom.

    Considering the price of some of the hams, it sounds like a good way to move the meat.
  • Post #16 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 pm
    Post #16 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 pm Post #16 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 pm
    Mrs. JiLS and I decided to cut out and spend St. Patrick's Day (as celebrated) in Milwaukee. They have a great parade there, more human-scaled than Chicago's, and it terminates on 3rd Street more or less in front of Mader's. So that is where we had our lunch, and it was fantastic. This was a first visit for us both. Seated in the small room behind the bar, we began with a couple of nice cold steins of bier and a brilliant potato, cheese and bacon soup. This was presented almost as a "foam" that transmuted what should've been the heaviest, starch- and fatty-est concoction into a light-textured delight, that glided over the tongue and delivered flavors as intense as any high-tech food system served at Alinea or Moto. And that was just the soup. The lunch menu is pretty small, with just the "greatest hits" available. I had saurbraten that, at least in my limited experience, was a revelation. Yes, the gingery, raisin-spiked sauce was tart, spicy and delicious; yes, the spaetzle were light, delicately browned and toothsome; but the meat itself! Well, it was actually tender, and only cooked to a medium pink -- not blasted to death and a shoeleather texture I associate with this dish (no doubt based on poor experiences). Still, this was an eye-opener. Mrs. JilS's wiener schnitzel was also delightful, with a perfectly textured coating over flavorful and tender veal. Desserts were the kicker, though. VI's experience was that the stuff on the menu was identical to the buffet, but here there was an obvious difference. Six or seven desserts were displayed for our review and delectation (none of them was a sheet cake or anything else so pedestrian). We couldn't decide on a dessert, and therefore selected two of them. I had a pistachio cheesecake, served in a baking dish and topped with whipped cream and fresh strawberry slices; though not my preferred dry "German-style" of cheesecake (the kind so dry it is almost a punishment to eat it), it was a masterful work of dessert artistry. I'd go back for this cheesecake alone. But, then I'd miss out on the dessert of Mrs. JiLS's choice, namely the chocolate ganache. Whichever of Satan's helpers invented this dish, I hope he's roasting on a particularly well-situated spit in Hell's Kitchen. The Dark One could use this dish to seal the deal on soul-related transactions, and should check with Mader's management for the recipe. An elevated hockey-puck diameter chocolate cake, served the temperature of a low-grade fever, pumped full of super-saturated chocolate goo, and with a smooth, dark chocolate outer layer, just in case the rest wasn't enough. And because these are good Germans, plenty of whipped cream and a couple of choice red raspberries on top. Good thing I'd had a couple of beers by this time, or I might have tried to resist eating half of each of these desserts. Afterward, a stiff walk across town to the Will Smith's favorite Milwaukee bookstore helped clear my swimming head.
    JiLS
  • Post #17 - March 11th, 2006, 10:50 pm
    Post #17 - March 11th, 2006, 10:50 pm Post #17 - March 11th, 2006, 10:50 pm
    Jim,

    I was at Mader's a few years ago. The menu was featuring lite-versions of German favorites. They also scattered pumpkin seeds on our salads. Did you see any evidence of that? I have the feeling they have smartly returned to full strength German or at least that is my hope.

    Sounds like you had a lovely day.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #18 - March 11th, 2006, 10:54 pm
    Post #18 - March 11th, 2006, 10:54 pm Post #18 - March 11th, 2006, 10:54 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Jim,

    I was at Mader's a few years ago. The menu was featuring lite-versions of German favorites. They also scattered pumpkin seeds on our salads. Did you see any evidence of that? I have the feeling they have smartly returned to full strength German or at least that is my hope.

    Sounds like you had a lovely day.

    Regards,


    Salad, with or without pumpkin seeds, was an option we rejected. So I can't say for sure, but there was nothing "lite" about our meal today. Although the saurbraten was more artfully plated than I am used to, and the desserts were not standard German restaurant fare and seemed somewhat "updated" (but not "litened").
    JiLS
  • Post #19 - March 17th, 2006, 12:35 pm
    Post #19 - March 17th, 2006, 12:35 pm Post #19 - March 17th, 2006, 12:35 pm
    Alterra coffee (the coffee not the restaurant) is awesome. I used to work at Rochambo on Brady when they were first starting out.

    Three Brothers on the S. Side is the Beard award winning Serbian place...

    Crazy Water 839 S.2nd st.
    FANTASTIC Walker's Point restaurant. FANTASTIC.
    "Yum"
    -- Everyone

    www.chicagofoodies.com
  • Post #20 - February 21st, 2009, 2:37 pm
    Post #20 - February 21st, 2009, 2:37 pm Post #20 - February 21st, 2009, 2:37 pm
    Figured I would report on my recent dinner at Mader's, and this seems as good a thread as any to add it.

    Short version - awful.

    Long version:

    The liver dumpling soup is pretty good, though with the heavy dose of dill, it is not my preferred style. It is a generous portion of a good soup. Good beers, too.

    They have removed duck from the menu, and we were given what seemed an insulting explanation to me - they were so unhappy with the quality of duck available, they removed it from the menu altogether. Come on guys, there is no good source for duck in Wisconsin??? My guess is that the margins were not good, maybe both because of the cost of the duck, and the amounts they ended up throwing away, but that is just my guess.

    Salads were okay, in the expected old world (think iceberg) style. The Pork Shank on a bed of sauerkraut was fine, not anything special, could have profited from another hour of braising and a bit more seasoning, IMO, but it did not have any noticeable flaws.

    The desserts were flat out awful. Strudel tasted mostly of almond extract, and not in a good way. Schaum Torte was based on a meringue that appeared to have been prepared in the previous century. I suspect they just forget to deliver the hammer and chisel with it, but even then the insipid ice cream and chocolate sauce would have limited the appeal.

    And, yes, it was expensive, particularly for what we got. If I go back it will be against my wishes. One could make a decent meal of the liver dumpling soup, some rolls and a beer in the bar, I think, but unless it was just a bad night, and given those comments about the duck I suspect there is something more afoot, I sure can't see the point.

    But the room is pleasant and Usingers is just across the street. Not all bad.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #21 - February 21st, 2009, 3:26 pm
    Post #21 - February 21st, 2009, 3:26 pm Post #21 - February 21st, 2009, 3:26 pm
    dicksond,

    What happens in Wisconsin, stays in Wisconsin, so here's a local place in Franklin, that's a well guarded secret. It's Wegner's St. Martin's Inn. Owned by Dennis Wegner, chef and NASCAR fan, it's a hidden gem serving a few Teutonic delights that pack the place. You'll need to make a reservation for dinner. The small, non-smoking dining room is connected to a bar decorated with NASCAR fenders, bumpers, posters, and a display case loaded with 60's muscle car models. Forget the Friday night fish fry, unless arriving early. On Wednesday's, Dennis will pan fry perch on request. Be sure to mention that your fish should not swim in wine. Check out the menu for the German dishes. They're all very good, better than your last German dining experience and much more affordable. The reuben rolls are known throughout southeastern Wisconsin and have finally become a regular menu item, along with the reuben soup. If you go, go for the German food.

    Wegner's St. Martin's Inn
    11318 W. St. Martin's Road
    Franklin, WI 53132
    414.425.9971
    http://www.stmartinsinn.com
    Last edited by chicagostyledog on February 22nd, 2009, 7:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Born and raised in Chicago, escaped to Wisconsin.
  • Post #22 - February 22nd, 2009, 1:46 am
    Post #22 - February 22nd, 2009, 1:46 am Post #22 - February 22nd, 2009, 1:46 am
    At the risk of making it harder to get a table than it already is (Think Burt's, post No Reservations-oy), I will second the recommendation for Wegner's. Excellent German food at reasonable prices. If you go on Friday, be prepared for a fish fry menu. Nuthin' but fish. Fried.

    Okay, they've got a sausage sampler plate for the few obstinate yahoos who won't eat fish on Friday, in Wisconsin. I mean, gee whillikers, what is the freakin' problem? Even this Chicago Jewboy enjoys a nice plate of fried fish on a Friday in Wisconsin. Throw in a latke on the side (the cheeseheads call them potato pancakes **snicker**) and you're in business!

    But the rest of the week it's back to the German food. And I think they're closed on Sundays.

    Buddy
  • Post #23 - February 22nd, 2009, 10:18 am
    Post #23 - February 22nd, 2009, 10:18 am Post #23 - February 22nd, 2009, 10:18 am
    Chicagostyledog,

    We have a summer place just over the border in Bristol, Kenosha County. We have had a difficult time finding decent places to eat. We like the Bristol Diner just fine and the burgers and pizza at Vaj's, the local bar on the lake, are fine but we havent found much else. We are sort of in that no-mans land between Lake Geneva and Kenosha/Racine. Any recommendations out our way in Bristol, Paddock Lake, Genoa City and the likes.

    Thanks
  • Post #24 - February 22nd, 2009, 12:32 pm
    Post #24 - February 22nd, 2009, 12:32 pm Post #24 - February 22nd, 2009, 12:32 pm
    Hi,

    Gloria's Nautical Inn in "beautiful downtown Bristol" used to pack them in on Saturday night for steaks. It was always a joy to look at the back bar painting with the cotton wad providing smoke from a city scene. Not quite fine dining, but fun.

    You may have to venture to Kenosha, Lake Geneva or Burlington.

    Tim
  • Post #25 - February 22nd, 2009, 5:07 pm
    Post #25 - February 22nd, 2009, 5:07 pm Post #25 - February 22nd, 2009, 5:07 pm
    iblock9 wrote:Chicagostyledog,

    We have a summer place just over the border in Bristol, Kenosha County. We have had a difficult time finding decent places to eat. We like the Bristol Diner just fine and the burgers and pizza at Vaj's, the local bar on the lake, are fine but we havent found much else. We are sort of in that no-mans land between Lake Geneva and Kenosha/Racine. Any recommendations out our way in Bristol, Paddock Lake, Genoa City and the likes.

    Thanks



    This place is open only a few days a week including Friday and Saturdays. They do a Door Co. style fish boil on a weekly basis and serve it with several other items buffet style.

    I thought the food, especially the fish, was really good. The service was weird. It is one of those locals places where they expect that you know how everything works. If you don't, well, that is YOUR problem. That is a Wisconsin thing that we have encountered at least a dozen times throughout the state.

    Cash only.

    If you use the search function, Cathy2 also ahs tried this place.

    The last time that I was there, dinner was $14/pp.

    Fitzgerald Octogen House
    727 Main St,
    Genoa City, WI
    Tel: (262) 279-5200


    If you are willing to drive south of the Cheddar Curtain, there are a couple of options in Hebron. Crandall's serves some pretty good broasted chicken. Also, right by the flashing red light, there is a non-descript diner that serves up some wicked-good pies.

    The Bake House also does some pretty good pizza.

    The Chicago Pizza Co. in Lake Geneva has some pretty decent pizza.
  • Post #26 - February 23rd, 2009, 12:30 am
    Post #26 - February 23rd, 2009, 12:30 am Post #26 - February 23rd, 2009, 12:30 am
    jlawrence01 wrote: They do a Door Co. style fish boil


    This is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for. Thanks
  • Post #27 - February 23rd, 2009, 1:12 am
    Post #27 - February 23rd, 2009, 1:12 am Post #27 - February 23rd, 2009, 1:12 am
    iblock9 wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote: They do a Door Co. style fish boil


    This is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for. Thanks


    viewtopic.php?f=15&t=324&hilit=fitzgerald

    This link will take you to a link describing the Fitzgerald experience. You'll want to read it before going.

    Also, there are some references to Lake Geneva eating places although I avoid the area like the plague between May - September.
  • Post #28 - February 23rd, 2009, 8:27 am
    Post #28 - February 23rd, 2009, 8:27 am Post #28 - February 23rd, 2009, 8:27 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:This link will take you to a link describing the Fitzgerald experience. You'll want to read it before going.

    Also, there are some references to Lake Geneva eating places although I avoid the area like the plague between May - September.


    Thanks for the info. Ill save the fish boil for a boring weekend. As nice as Lake Geneva can be I try and stay as far away as I can which is why we stick to our neck of the woods. I guess burgers at Culvers in Pleasant Prarie isnt so bad. And look, wow, they opened a Noodles & Co. too. My grill beckons, as does pie from the Brass Bell.
  • Post #29 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:27 am
    Post #29 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:27 am Post #29 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:27 am
    iblock9 wrote:My grill beckons, as does pie from the Brass Bell.


    That's Brass Ball
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #30 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:59 am
    Post #30 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:59 am Post #30 - February 23rd, 2009, 9:59 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:I don't know what the story is. However, I do know that the Pic-n-Save in Delavan on US-14 gives you free 6 pack of buns if you buy a ham on Sundays. It seems like a local custom.

    Considering the price of some of the hams, it sounds like a good way to move the meat.


    This reminded me of how many signs I saw in the Wisconsin part of the Lake Michigan circle tour on local deli's/grocery stores/bakery's offering ham off the bone and biscuits every Sunday. It wasn't Sunday and its a short ride thru Wisconsin on that trip so I never thought of it again. Is this a local thing in and around the counties near the lake?

    iblock9 wrote:Chicagostyledog,

    We have a summer place just over the border in Bristol, Kenosha County. We have had a difficult time finding decent places to eat. We like the Bristol Diner just fine and the burgers and pizza at Vaj's, the local bar on the lake, are fine but we havent found much else. We are sort of in that no-mans land between Lake Geneva and Kenosha/Racine. Any recommendations out our way in Bristol, Paddock Lake, Genoa City and the likes.

    Thanks


    According to Rand McNally its only 16 miles from Bristol to Burlington. If you haven't been I would recommend at least one trip a summer to Fred's Bar in Burlington, home of the self proclaimed "worlds best burger" Best ever? that's hard to name but it sure didn't disappoint me as far as a Wisconsin bar butter burger and I think you'll enjoy them more than "just fine" It can get pretty packed at night but is pretty calm during the day but I was also there in November. The homemade curly fries might be the best I have ever had and they have spotted cow on tap. You can always make a day trip out of it and stop at River Valley Ranch and stock up on stuff for the fridge and pantry.

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