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recommend a good Jewish Deli Sandwich Shop?

recommend a good Jewish Deli Sandwich Shop?
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  • Post #31 - November 6th, 2017, 8:46 am
    Post #31 - November 6th, 2017, 8:46 am Post #31 - November 6th, 2017, 8:46 am
    What happened to the big Jewish delis in Chicago?

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/re ... story.html
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #32 - November 6th, 2017, 9:13 am
    Post #32 - November 6th, 2017, 9:13 am Post #32 - November 6th, 2017, 9:13 am
    Dave148 wrote:
    What happened to the big Jewish delis in Chicago?

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/re ... story.html

    "It has simply a few slices of shaved corned beef or turkey pastrami..." Use of the word shaved has me setting a low bar already for that sandwich
    I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be.
  • Post #33 - November 6th, 2017, 11:16 am
    Post #33 - November 6th, 2017, 11:16 am Post #33 - November 6th, 2017, 11:16 am
    Dave148 wrote:
    What happened to the big Jewish delis in Chicago?

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/re ... story.html

    I'm surprised that Louisa's survey doesn't mention The Bagel, on Broadway. The place has its detractors as well as its proponents, but the article's focus doesn't seem to be "here's a selective list of my very favorite Jewish delis," but rather "here's a survey of still-surviving Jewish delis." The Bagel unquestionably is one.
    Pithy quote here.
  • Post #34 - November 6th, 2017, 2:10 pm
    Post #34 - November 6th, 2017, 2:10 pm Post #34 - November 6th, 2017, 2:10 pm
    Mods, please move response elsewhere if need be///I am not a fan of the "mile-high" Jewish deli sandwiches and would gladly pay 12-15 for the sandwich pictured above(in the linked article). The steady decline of Jewish delis in America is well-documented. While I remain inexperienced with those in Chicago(having lived in the city for ten years, alas), Indianapolis(our home for 6 years) boasts Shapiro's(much covered on LTH), https://shapiros.com a great, long-lived Jewish deli. Living and working in grocery in New York, one experiences gradations of Jewish deli culture. (Thousands of our bodegas serve the same menu of the unfortunately-degraded Boar's Head product 24-7) My flagship store in Eli Zabar's empire on the UES is not as Jewish as the other brother's place, Zabar's, on the West Side. Funnily, enough, I catch my bus to get to Eli's a block away from Zabar's which I first visited 28 years ago. Long story, so, Eli's is not all that Jewish in general and sometimes spectacularly Jewish, especially during the high holy days. And, much of our clientele is elderly, wealthy, and Jewish in a, "how dare Eli charge these prices!" And, they shop there anyway, for, to be Jewish on the UES is to complain and complain, and feel grateful in the complaining. I have spent nearly a year immersed in a culture I knew tangentially and now grok much more. Not that I understand it, just that I grok it. I mean, NYC is still the epicenter of Jewish cultures in America. We recently took in the Modigliani exhibit at The Jewish Museum where there is a Russ and Daughters in the basement. Who knew? An addendum: I grew up loving delis and deli sandwiches: cold rare roast beef with swiss and deli(brown) mustard and a Dr. Brown's Black Cherry soda. However, delis in Houston were typically run by Pakistanis(think gas station stores), or, Italians(think Butera's) or Antone's(Syrian/Lebanese...and still one of the Italian subs I dream about, have reverse-engineered), http://antoneshouston.com My mom took me to the original in the Hospital District, they subsequently-watered down their brand by over-expansion, but still, a great deli sub/grinder/hero/hoagie. These stores (excepting original locations) were debrided of ethnicity; simply efficiently run, and delicious. Or, there was the pinnacle: Nielsen's(Danish). https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_ ... Texas.html Oh, god, Nielsen's, my mom took me to the original location as a tyke, and my dad took me to the new(relatively, this now being many years ago, new location at my request upon a visit back) housemade roast beef on Nielsen's homemade white bread with Nielsen's sauce plus a slice of their pudding -like cheese cake and a Dr. Brown's Black Cherry soda. Heaven. A protestant heaven(for an American Atheist boy), for sure.
    "Johnny thought when all purpose had been forgotten the world would end this way, with a dance. He slumped back in a corner, drew his knees up to his chin, and watched."-Derek Jarman
  • Post #35 - November 6th, 2017, 7:44 pm
    Post #35 - November 6th, 2017, 7:44 pm Post #35 - November 6th, 2017, 7:44 pm
    Sweet Willie wrote:"It has simply a few slices of shaved corned beef or turkey pastrami..." Use of the word shaved has me setting a low bar already for that sandwich


    Keep in mind that she also calls the corned beef at Kaufmann's shaved.
  • Post #36 - November 7th, 2017, 10:57 am
    Post #36 - November 7th, 2017, 10:57 am Post #36 - November 7th, 2017, 10:57 am
    riddlemay wrote:I'm surprised that Louisa's survey doesn't mention The Bagel, on Broadway. The place has its detractors as well as its proponents, but the article's focus doesn't seem to be "here's a selective list of my very favorite Jewish delis," but rather "here's a survey of still-surviving Jewish delis." The Bagel unquestionably is one.

    The Bagel (Skokie location, not Broadway) is featured in the first two photos of the photo gallery that showcases the current places. The Old Orchard location is five years older than the one in Lakeview (I was surprised to learn), so I guess it makes sense to choose that one.

    It's too bad Braverman's wasn't included with the greats. The old West Town deli that closed in the late '70s was my favorite place ever for corned beef in Chicago.

    Benny the Bull was inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame yesterday. What's that got to do with delis? One of the early Bennys (1976-85) was Howard Kirshner, owner of Sam & Hy's Deli in Skokie: "I was around when the [San Diego] Chicken was just an egg." Who knew Benny liked kishke?
  • Post #37 - November 9th, 2017, 7:52 pm
    Post #37 - November 9th, 2017, 7:52 pm Post #37 - November 9th, 2017, 7:52 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:I grew up loving delis and deli sandwiches: cold rare roast beef with swiss and deli(brown) mustard and a Dr. Brown's Black Cherry soda.

    Trafe! :shock:
  • Post #38 - November 10th, 2017, 7:46 am
    Post #38 - November 10th, 2017, 7:46 am Post #38 - November 10th, 2017, 7:46 am
    I can't seem to find it online, but yesterday's Red Eye has a very positive article about Steingold's. The writer was especially keen on the one sandwich I've tried - the sister in law- with pastrami, kimchi and spicy mustard. It's the cover sandwich on their website. The Red Eye has that photo, but called it a bacon sandwich in the caption.
  • Post #39 - November 10th, 2017, 10:53 am
    Post #39 - November 10th, 2017, 10:53 am Post #39 - November 10th, 2017, 10:53 am
    As long as we still have Manny's and The Bagel (Old Orchard store), I'm happy when I need my fix.

    Raskins used to be our landlords for our brokerage office at the corner of Jefferson & Grenshaw that Manny's deli counter expanded into. Visited them for the first time in years a couple weeks ago and was amazed and quite pleased with the transformation. Many of the same workers remain--yes, Gino the mustachioed meat slicer is still there--and chatted with Danny Raskin, congratulating him on a job well done with the change. His parents Kenny & Patty should be proud of him. Oh, and the short ribs with carrots & prunes were wonderful, as was the ultimate comfort food for this Italian from Skokie--a piece of kishke with gravy. No, I didn't need the paddles this time.
  • Post #40 - November 10th, 2017, 11:57 am
    Post #40 - November 10th, 2017, 11:57 am Post #40 - November 10th, 2017, 11:57 am
    nsxtasy wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:I grew up loving delis and deli sandwiches: cold rare roast beef with swiss and deli(brown) mustard and a Dr. Brown's Black Cherry soda.

    Trafe! :shock:


    One time, a non MOTT tried to explain to me how the Reuben was the quintessential Jewish sandwich. I had to laugh because there's no way that anything so treif as mixing milk and meat would ever qualify.
  • Post #41 - November 10th, 2017, 1:31 pm
    Post #41 - November 10th, 2017, 1:31 pm Post #41 - November 10th, 2017, 1:31 pm
    I miss the many Jewish restaurants that used to pepper The Loop...

    Bev and Bobs on Adams, shoulder to shoulder at the communal tables, buckets of complementary baby dills...

    In the Jewelers Building (where I used to work) there were two, a full restaurant on the 7th floor and a snack shop on the 2nd.

    I remember there were more but these three more than kept me fed.
    "Make Lunch, Not War" ~ Anon
  • Post #42 - November 10th, 2017, 5:18 pm
    Post #42 - November 10th, 2017, 5:18 pm Post #42 - November 10th, 2017, 5:18 pm
    I can attest to the closing of Ada's Famous Deli in the Loop as a good thing.
  • Post #43 - November 11th, 2017, 12:25 pm
    Post #43 - November 11th, 2017, 12:25 pm Post #43 - November 11th, 2017, 12:25 pm
    Burt's Deli in Libertyville continues to offer the old style Jewish deli experience. Ralph, the son of Burt, is the perfect deli schmoozer who personally assembles your sandwich.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8XZHsdMxak

    Bert's Deli
    114 Greentree Center
    Libertyville, IL 60048
    (847)367-9687
    M-F 9am-5pm
    Sat 9am-4:30pm
    Sun Closed

    CSD
    Born and raised in Chicago, escaped to Wisconsin.
  • Post #44 - November 11th, 2017, 8:07 pm
    Post #44 - November 11th, 2017, 8:07 pm Post #44 - November 11th, 2017, 8:07 pm
    When my mom still lived in Michigan, we were regulars at The Stage Deli. It's one of the things I definitely miss about Michigan. Oh, boy, was it good -- never had mushroom barley soup that good anywhere else, and the hot pastrami was phenomenal. But reading this thread suggests to me that I have some "exploring" to do -- maybe there is a replacement out there, without having to drive all the way back to West Bloomfield. :)
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #45 - November 13th, 2017, 4:27 pm
    Post #45 - November 13th, 2017, 4:27 pm Post #45 - November 13th, 2017, 4:27 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:We recently took in the Modigliani exhibit at The Jewish Museum where there is a Russ and Daughters in the basement. Who knew?

    Severely offtopic, but that's a great exhibition. Just saw it last weekend.

    I think R&D has been there for a couple of years now. Don't know anyone who's ever eaten there, so can't comment. Seems like the kind of cuisine that's pretty easy to port, though.
  • Post #46 - November 13th, 2017, 7:22 pm
    Post #46 - November 13th, 2017, 7:22 pm Post #46 - November 13th, 2017, 7:22 pm
    I had no idea that Modigliani was such an identity warrior, and, a huge psycho: this latter info given me by one of my favorite clients, a docent at the MFA. I mean, I took art history as part of my BFA, but, one loses bits and pieces. More than eating Jewish food, or, being invited to shabbat in college by a boy who wanted me, and it wasn't about to happen, still, I remember his noodle kugel. Working on the Upper East Side of New York, I see more osteoporosis than a nursing facility, I see more yarmulkes, I see more of what it is to be orthodox, but, not THAT orthodox, no prayer strings, no dark clothes, wigs, maybe, I see a culture in deep, a culture I am uncertain about(on the outside), I am an American Atheist, but, I had a client tell me, well, she is Jewish, but, an atheist. And, this is nothing new. Jews want vacherin mont d'or. Atheists desire reblochon, cabochon, Willi Schmidt's Bergfichte appeals to the most devout.
    "Johnny thought when all purpose had been forgotten the world would end this way, with a dance. He slumped back in a corner, drew his knees up to his chin, and watched."-Derek Jarman
  • Post #47 - November 13th, 2017, 9:02 pm
    Post #47 - November 13th, 2017, 9:02 pm Post #47 - November 13th, 2017, 9:02 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Jews want vacherin mont d'or. Atheists desire reblochon, cabochon, Willi Schmidt's Bergfichte appeals to the most devout.


    Lenny Bruce wrote:All Drake’s cakes are goyish. Pumpernickel is Jewish.
  • Post #48 - November 13th, 2017, 9:30 pm
    Post #48 - November 13th, 2017, 9:30 pm Post #48 - November 13th, 2017, 9:30 pm
    Darren72 wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Jews want vacherin mont d'or. Atheists desire reblochon, cabochon, Willi Schmidt's Bergfichte appeals to the most devout.


    Lenny Bruce wrote:All Drake’s cakes are goyish. Pumpernickel is Jewish.


    Every Jewish Grandmother wrote: You should eat something.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #49 - December 3rd, 2017, 9:54 am
    Post #49 - December 3rd, 2017, 9:54 am Post #49 - December 3rd, 2017, 9:54 am
    Panther in the Den wrote:I miss the many Jewish restaurants that used to pepper The Loop...

    Bev and Bobs on Adams, shoulder to shoulder at the communal tables, buckets of complementary baby dills...

    In the Jewelers Building (where I used to work) there were two, a full restaurant on the 7th floor and a snack shop on the 2nd.

    I remember there were more but these three more than kept me fed.

    My grandfather, of blessed memory, was a regular at the small lunch counter in the Mallers building. He insisted, much to my chagrin, on having the tongue each and every time.
  • Post #50 - December 3rd, 2017, 10:22 am
    Post #50 - December 3rd, 2017, 10:22 am Post #50 - December 3rd, 2017, 10:22 am
    I remember a good deli at about 200 e. Grand call Jerry and Hys. Jerry was a totally abnoxius counterman.Some great lunch time banter
  • Post #51 - December 3rd, 2017, 12:47 pm
    Post #51 - December 3rd, 2017, 12:47 pm Post #51 - December 3rd, 2017, 12:47 pm
    jilter wrote:
    Panther in the Den wrote:In the Jewelers Building (where I used to work) there were two, a full restaurant on the 7th floor and a snack shop on the 2nd.

    My grandfather, of blessed memory, was a regular at the small lunch counter in the Mallers building. He insisted, much to my chagrin, on having the tongue each and every time.

    Mallers Building Coffee Shop, a favorite of mine in the 1970s, was actually on the third floor. This sticks in my mind because when taking the stairs (I often opted for the elevators because of the rare-even-then elevator operators), the stairway door was labelled "3th Floor." Tongue was good, but I was partial to the chopped liver plate – a generous scoop with two excellent potato pancakes plus a basket of rye, a pickle spear and a few Greek olives.

    jerryg wrote:I remember a good deli at about 200 e. Grand call Jerry and Hys. Jerry was a totally abnoxius counterman.Some great lunch time banter

    I don't know anything about Hy's involvement, but in any case the big neon sign said only "Jerry's." Jerry was the subject of a short 1976 documentary by Tom Palazzolo, a notable Chicago filmmaker. You can watch it here. That version is painfully out-of-sync, but still well worth watching.
  • Post #52 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:08 pm
    Post #52 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:08 pm Post #52 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:08 pm
    I don't know if there's any relationship, but there was also Sam & Hy's in Skokie, on Dempster a few blocks west of McCormick.
  • Post #53 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:29 pm
    Post #53 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:29 pm Post #53 - December 3rd, 2017, 2:29 pm
    nsxtasy wrote:I don't know if there's any relationship, but there was also Sam & Hy's in Skokie, on Dempster a few blocks west of McCormick.

    Yes, as mentioned above, that was Benny the Bull's place!
  • Post #54 - December 3rd, 2017, 4:09 pm
    Post #54 - December 3rd, 2017, 4:09 pm Post #54 - December 3rd, 2017, 4:09 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    jerryg wrote:I remember a good deli at about 200 e. Grand call Jerry and Hys. Jerry was a totally abnoxius counterman.Some great lunch time banter

    I don't know anything about Hy's involvement, but in any case the big neon sign said only "Jerry's." Jerry was the subject of a short 1976 documentary by Tom Palazzolo, a notable Chicago filmmaker. You can watch it here. That version is painfully out-of-sync, but still well worth watching.


    I never thought Jerry's was a particularly good deli. I used to work on film news crews when I was quite young, and the film development lab was right next door. We'd frequently kill time at the lab waiting for our next assignment. I wasn't warned about Jerry's schtick before I walked in. My co-workers thought it was funnier that way.

    Giovanna

    ETA that film is hilarious, tho. I do NOT miss those fugly 70's sideburns :roll: .
    =o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=

    "Enjoy every sandwich."

    -Warren Zevon

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