LTH Home

Baked Goods at Chiu Quon (photo essay)

Baked Goods at Chiu Quon (photo essay)
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • Baked Goods at Chiu Quon (photo essay)

    Post #1 - January 27th, 2006, 6:32 pm
    Post #1 - January 27th, 2006, 6:32 pm Post #1 - January 27th, 2006, 6:32 pm
    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Chiu Quon Bakery
    1127 W. Argyle, Chicago
    Tel: (773) 907-8888
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #2 - June 7th, 2007, 2:51 pm
    Post #2 - June 7th, 2007, 2:51 pm Post #2 - June 7th, 2007, 2:51 pm
    This is beautiful and I plan on stopping by on Saturday. Any suggestions on what to sample? I am a newcomer to the entire Vietnamese culinary world.

    Also, I'm just done a search and a lot of reading. For two newbies, would Tank or Sun Wah be a better choice for dinner?
    Kacie
  • Post #3 - June 7th, 2007, 3:03 pm
    Post #3 - June 7th, 2007, 3:03 pm Post #3 - June 7th, 2007, 3:03 pm
    papua2001mk wrote:Also, I'm just done a search and a lot of reading. For two newbies, would Tank or Sun Wah be a better choice for dinner?
    Kacie


    If you're looking for Vietnamese, definitely Tank... Sun Wah is a Chinese restaurant :-)
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #4 - June 7th, 2007, 3:06 pm
    Post #4 - June 7th, 2007, 3:06 pm Post #4 - June 7th, 2007, 3:06 pm
    Ah well, there we go. I still wouldn't mind... the goal was to experience Argyle street and my understanding was it was mostly Vietnamese... but Chinese food would be fine as well. Quality and price are most important. :)
  • Post #5 - June 7th, 2007, 3:24 pm
    Post #5 - June 7th, 2007, 3:24 pm Post #5 - June 7th, 2007, 3:24 pm
    papua2001mk wrote:Ah well, there we go. I still wouldn't mind... the goal was to experience Argyle street and my understanding was it was mostly Vietnamese... but Chinese food would be fine as well. Quality and price are most important. :)


    Both are very good. It depends on whether you feel like Vietnamese or Chinese food at the time you are going.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #6 - June 7th, 2007, 3:26 pm
    Post #6 - June 7th, 2007, 3:26 pm Post #6 - June 7th, 2007, 3:26 pm
    papua2001mk wrote:Ah well, there we go. I still wouldn't mind... the goal was to experience Argyle street and my understanding was it was mostly Vietnamese... but Chinese food would be fine as well. Quality and price are most important. :)


    It is mostly Vietnamese, you're correct, but there's a smattering of other Asian foods in there as well. If it's your first visit to the neighborhood, I say start with Tank and branch out from there.
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #7 - June 7th, 2007, 3:51 pm
    Post #7 - June 7th, 2007, 3:51 pm Post #7 - June 7th, 2007, 3:51 pm
    This is beautiful and I plan on stopping by on Saturday. Any suggestions on what to sample?


    Definitely eat at Tank. If you stop by the bakery, try the coconut buns (I think you should start with the ones that are smoother on the outside, not the more photogenic ones in Mike G's picture), the sesame cookies and, my personal favorite, the bean paste cakes (I admit, more of an acquired taste).
  • Post #8 - June 8th, 2007, 10:52 am
    Post #8 - June 8th, 2007, 10:52 am Post #8 - June 8th, 2007, 10:52 am
    What all is in the sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaf? One of our most favorite dim sum items is the lotus leaf rice stuffed with all sorts of wonderfuls, like sausage and egg etc. I'd love to be able to swing by Chiu Quon and pick one up anytime.

    One time we were enjoying a particularly delicious version when a woman walked by our table, asked what it was, and when we told her, she snapped, "Well, it looks disgusting!" and pranced off. After recovering the power of speech, we spent the next few minutes poking fun at her incredible rudeness...then realized when she returned that she was sitting with the large party just inches from us, who spent the rest of the meal shifting uncomfortably.

    Still not sure if we had embarrassed ourselves or what :lol:
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #9 - June 8th, 2007, 11:09 am
    Post #9 - June 8th, 2007, 11:09 am Post #9 - June 8th, 2007, 11:09 am
    So wait, she said it was disgusting, and then she sat down at the restaurant it came from?

    I'd say any response short of a felony was reasonable...
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #10 - June 8th, 2007, 11:27 am
    Post #10 - June 8th, 2007, 11:27 am Post #10 - June 8th, 2007, 11:27 am
    Yes, the whole party had been happily chowing down for some time.

    Of course, once we realized that the judgement-passer had come from their table, we had to discreetly check out what they had ordered. Apparently sweet and sour pork, egg rolls, and orange chicken are not disgusting in the least.
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #11 - June 10th, 2007, 10:46 pm
    Post #11 - June 10th, 2007, 10:46 pm Post #11 - June 10th, 2007, 10:46 pm
    I really like Chiu Quon's winter melon cakes, at least those at the Chinatown branch.

    Wikipedia has a photo of one (though it doesn't tempt me the way these do!): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_heart_cake
  • Post #12 - June 10th, 2007, 11:11 pm
    Post #12 - June 10th, 2007, 11:11 pm Post #12 - June 10th, 2007, 11:11 pm
    Those (aka wife cakes) are my favorite thing at Chiu Quon*, but the moon cakes, custard buns (especially when just baked), and sesame balls are also not to be missed.




    *In my experience, they are slightly better at the Chinatown location.
  • Post #13 - June 13th, 2007, 9:27 pm
    Post #13 - June 13th, 2007, 9:27 pm Post #13 - June 13th, 2007, 9:27 pm
    Chiu Quon is just delightful!

    I am a devoted fan to their soft, round little buns. In particular, I enjoy grabbing a Ham & Egg and a Sui Mai (the same dumpling filling for dim sum) for breakfast.

    With gas prices pushing 4 bucks, I have returned to riding the train, which means hopping the "el" at Argyle most mornings.

    Chiu Quon can also satisfy a few dim sum cravings...although that is a bit hit and miss some days.

    In brushes with greatness: I saw Calvin Trillin discussing his new (at the time) book with one of Tribune folks one morning.

    pd
    Unchain your lunch money!
  • Post #14 - June 14th, 2007, 12:11 am
    Post #14 - June 14th, 2007, 12:11 am Post #14 - June 14th, 2007, 12:11 am
    This branch of CQ is a treasure. Much better than the one in Chinatown. I often go on Sundays when everyone is too lazy to go out for breakfast. Favorites for us include the chewy torpedo shaped "pork and shrimp" buns (if you are lucky enough to get these still hot they are one of the best things you will ever eat), flaky curry puffs, BBQ pork buns, "pointy noodles", flat custard and red bean cakes and the creme brulee or custard tarts (which melt in your mouth). I like the ham and egg and sweet onion buns too. They also make good ha gow and pot stickers though these sometimes require a wait. I'm also quite fond of their paper wrapped sponge cakes. One of my favorite places on Argyle.
    Lacking fins or tail
    The Gefilte fish
    swims with great difficulty.

    Jewish haiku.
  • Post #15 - June 14th, 2007, 8:27 am
    Post #15 - June 14th, 2007, 8:27 am Post #15 - June 14th, 2007, 8:27 am
    kuhdo wrote:They also make good ha gow and pot stickers though these sometimes require a wait.

    Kuhdo,

    I'm a fan of Chiu Quon's (Argyle) pot stickers, nice hit of ginger, thickish crisp dough served piping hot. I've always had a wait for pot stickers as they pan fry to order.

    Chiu Quon Pot Stickers (Argyle)
    Image

    Dried shrimp chow fun is a favorite, love the chewy brine of dried shrimp against the delicate softness of steamed rice noodle coupled with the bright bounce of scallion.

    Chiu Quon Dried Shrimp Chow Fun (Argyle)
    Image

    Chiu Quon does a mean fried bread cruller as well, the perfect accompaniment to congee. Though, for the life of me, I can't ever remember having congee at Chiu Quon.

    Chiu Quon Fried Bread Cruller (Argyle)
    Image

    Count me among the fans of Chiu Quon

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Chiu Quon Bakery
    1127 W. Argyle, Chicago
    Chicago, IL
    773-907-8888
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #16 - June 14th, 2007, 8:42 am
    Post #16 - June 14th, 2007, 8:42 am Post #16 - June 14th, 2007, 8:42 am
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:What all is in the sticky rice wrapped in lotus leaf? One of our most favorite dim sum items is the lotus leaf rice stuffed with all sorts of wonderfuls, like sausage and egg etc. I'd love to be able to swing by Chiu Quon and pick one up anytime.

    Suzy,

    Varies, typically, as you mention, Chinese sausage, egg, plus chicken, duck, preserved veg, reconstituted dried mushroom, dried shrimp........ Lotus leaf and glutenous rice seem to be the only real constants.

    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:One time we were enjoying a particularly delicious version when a woman walked by our table, asked what it was, and when we told her, she snapped, "Well, it looks disgusting!" and pranced off.

    Too funny! Her disgusting is my, and yours, delicious.

    Chiu Quon Rice in Lotus Leaf (Argyle)
    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #17 - June 14th, 2007, 9:39 am
    Post #17 - June 14th, 2007, 9:39 am Post #17 - June 14th, 2007, 9:39 am
    Excellent! The lotus leaf rice is one of my favorite things about Chinese cuisine. I am excited and gratified to know that I can pick one up on my way home from work.

    ....though really, who am I kidding. I can never get out of Chiu Quon without one of every thing, and two of some.
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #18 - June 14th, 2007, 11:59 am
    Post #18 - June 14th, 2007, 11:59 am Post #18 - June 14th, 2007, 11:59 am
    I'd like to stop by here tomorrow and pick up some savory items for a party on Saturday. Any more specific suggestions, specifically ones that would keep well for 24 hours?

    -ramon
  • Post #19 - June 14th, 2007, 2:28 pm
    Post #19 - June 14th, 2007, 2:28 pm Post #19 - June 14th, 2007, 2:28 pm
    Ramon wrote:I'd like to stop by here tomorrow and pick up some savory items for a party on Saturday. Any more specific suggestions, specifically ones that would keep well for 24 hours?

    -ramon
    In my experience, all the baked goods keep for about 48-72 hours. However, we usually refrigerate things filled with meat and reheat them. The fried dough balls filled with red bean paste or ground meat ("gok") should be eaten on the first day though.

    You can buy the dried shrimp rice noodle packaged to go and steam it at home. We often buy the "joong" (sticky rice wrapped in banana leaves) and freeze them until we eat them. Again, these can be steamed at home for about 20 min. I miss the ones that my great grandmother used to make.
  • Post #20 - June 16th, 2007, 5:52 am
    Post #20 - June 16th, 2007, 5:52 am Post #20 - June 16th, 2007, 5:52 am
    Chiu Quon Pot Stickers (Argyle)
    Image

    Looks very similar to Korean mandu (만두).

    I used to live right around the corner from Chiu Quon's Chinatown location on Wentworth, I loved their ham & egg bun for breakfast.
    Or any time of the day. And my ex-girlfriend used to make the leaf-wrapped thingies, she would marinate pork for a couple of days and place that in the middle of sticky rice and steam it in the leaf. Almost heaven....
    There is no such passion in human nature, as the passion for gravy among commercial gentlemen. (Dickens)
  • Post #21 - June 16th, 2007, 9:23 am
    Post #21 - June 16th, 2007, 9:23 am Post #21 - June 16th, 2007, 9:23 am
    rickvaughn wrote:Looks very similar to Korean mandu (만두).


    Actually, I've recently came to terms with the fact that although I am Korean and this may be slightly sacrilegious, I am really really really obsessed with Chinese potstickers.

    The dumpling skin in the potsticker is doughier and chewier and thicker than that of the Korean mandu. The thicker skin makes for better pan frying and you get that lovely crispy almost burnt bottom. The filling is a ball of gingery pork and I love how it sometimes shrinks in cooking, because then you get more yummy dumpling dough to eat (When I was little I sometimes just ate the crispy fried outside of eggrolls and mandu and left the insides on my plate, much to the chagrin of my parents.) And the Chinese have a better way with the sauce too--they're usually served with that slightly sweet but vinegary soy sauce that gets more delicious as you dip your potstickers, because it picks up the residual oil from the pan frying as you're eating. I'm sometimes tempted to drink the leftover soy after I'm done eating, but I can never bring myself to do this. (On a side note, I recently went to LTH and they served the potstickers swimming in sauce, kind of like little dumpling islands. That was a particularly delicious version.)

    *sigh* I love Chinese potstickers. *sigh*

    Even though I've never met a dumpling I didn't like, I'm trying to find a way to break this to my family without soiling my family honour.

    Sharona
  • Post #22 - June 17th, 2007, 11:33 am
    Post #22 - June 17th, 2007, 11:33 am Post #22 - June 17th, 2007, 11:33 am
    Sharona wrote:The dumpling skin in the potsticker is doughier and chewier and thicker than that of the Korean mandu.


    Yeah, I've had a lot of mandu fall apart on me here in Korea, maybe because most places here get lazy and sell you the frozen ones they got in the supermarket. And most Chinese places I've been wouldn't dream of that.... My ex-girlfriend, who was from China, used to make Chinese dumplings with ground pork, chopped shrimp, fresh tofu and cilantro. And some kind of mushroom. Plus she would make her own dough....

    I do love kimchi mandu though....
    There is no such passion in human nature, as the passion for gravy among commercial gentlemen. (Dickens)
  • Post #23 - August 27th, 2009, 10:21 pm
    Post #23 - August 27th, 2009, 10:21 pm Post #23 - August 27th, 2009, 10:21 pm
    Stopped on Argyle for lunch today. I'd already surrendered most of my quarters to Evanston, so I only had 15 minutes. I remembered the high praise for Chiu Quon.

    Image

    Pointed noodles (and I got them by pointing to a tray on top of the counter and saying "I'd like some of that"), walnut cookie, cha sui bao. Total with tax? $4.08

    Sweet! Thanks again, LTH!
  • Post #24 - August 28th, 2009, 11:34 am
    Post #24 - August 28th, 2009, 11:34 am Post #24 - August 28th, 2009, 11:34 am
    I just love CQ. What can I say?

    I have been riding the train more frequently these days and it is always a great stop in the morning. I haven't had the pointy noodles in a while, but after Ann's post... I am going to have to make a stop this weekend.

    pd
    Unchain your lunch money!
  • Post #25 - August 28th, 2009, 11:36 am
    Post #25 - August 28th, 2009, 11:36 am Post #25 - August 28th, 2009, 11:36 am
    Hi,

    I call those pointy noodles torpedos. Does anyone know what the real name may be?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #26 - February 27th, 2010, 3:37 pm
    Post #26 - February 27th, 2010, 3:37 pm Post #26 - February 27th, 2010, 3:37 pm
    Crisp chewy dough, gingery pork filling w/celery highlights......substantial.

    If dumplings had jobs Chiu Quon's pot sticker would be a long-haul truck driver.

    Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #27 - February 27th, 2010, 5:17 pm
    Post #27 - February 27th, 2010, 5:17 pm Post #27 - February 27th, 2010, 5:17 pm
    G Wiv wrote:If dumplings had jobs Chiu Quon's pot sticker would be a long-haul truck driver.


    I'm debating between:

    "and if decapitated veal had a job, Mado's testa would be a masseuse" and

    "if donuts had jobs, Delightful Pastries' paczki would be Johnny Weir."
  • Post #28 - May 23rd, 2010, 9:33 am
    Post #28 - May 23rd, 2010, 9:33 am Post #28 - May 23rd, 2010, 9:33 am
    Hi,

    Two weeks ago, I ordered and paid for three dozen each of BBQ buns and ham & cheese buns, plus three packages of almond cookies and an Asian snack. The plan was to pick them up yesterday around 9 am for a Culinary Historians meeting.

    My expectation my order would be packed and ready to go. The first time they gave any thought to my order was when I gave them my paid receipt. They commenced packing ten buns to a box. There was a shortage of ham and cheese, which set off a few tense words between the servers and bakers. They suggested I take some ham and egg buns to fill the balance. I needed to go and took it.

    An hour later when these were served, everything still had a warm from the oven feel. The cheese was very nicely integrated with the ham. They were well received by everyone.

    My only word of wisdom on all this, even if you order in advance you need to plug in time for them to assemble your order. Yesterday was a day when I lost time to unexpected road construction, so those moments did count. In retrospect, perhaps calling to remind them as your drive over may help.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #29 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:11 pm
    Post #29 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:11 pm Post #29 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:11 pm
    Cathy, your experience at Chiu Quon does not surprise me. My mom recently called asking them to reserve 2 pkgs of the dried shrimp & scallion rice noodles to be picked up on a Saturday afternoon. When she arrived they had sold out and forgot to pull it after my mom called. My mom was pretty mad especially since they were pretty unapologetic and blamed it on someone else on staff for the oversight. (My mom is sweet mannered and does not get mean or mad easily!)

    Although it would not have helped in your situation, the bakeries in Chinatown Square are always really good about reserving things on the side when my mom calls ahead.
  • Post #30 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:15 pm
    Post #30 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:15 pm Post #30 - May 23rd, 2010, 5:15 pm
    Next time around, try Sun Sun Snack Shop (right under the El, half a block down from Chiu Quon) for their shrimp/scallion noodle rolls. I prefer them to Chiu Quon's, and they always have a ton.

    -Dan

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more