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Boeufhaus - meat, steaks and more in Ukrainian Village

Boeufhaus - meat, steaks and more in Ukrainian Village
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  • Post #31 - November 30th, 2017, 6:00 pm
    Post #31 - November 30th, 2017, 6:00 pm Post #31 - November 30th, 2017, 6:00 pm
    I bought some 55-day aged ribeyes at the butcher counter there last week and they were spectacular. Costly, yes but a true value given the quality.

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #32 - December 1st, 2017, 12:04 am
    Post #32 - December 1st, 2017, 12:04 am Post #32 - December 1st, 2017, 12:04 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I bought some 55-day aged ribeyes at the butcher counter there last week and they were spectacular. Costly, yes but a true value given the quality.

    =R=


    How’d you cook those? I’d be nervous cooking them on my own after spending the money
  • Post #33 - December 1st, 2017, 1:57 am
    Post #33 - December 1st, 2017, 1:57 am Post #33 - December 1st, 2017, 1:57 am
    JoeChicago wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I bought some 55-day aged ribeyes at the butcher counter there last week and they were spectacular. Costly, yes but a true value given the quality.

    =R=


    How’d you cook those? I’d be nervous cooking them on my own after spending the money

    Cast iron griddle in the center of my Weber kettle. And thinking about it, this was probably a really dumb time to try something I'd never tried before. In the end, I could have done better but all's well that ends well.

    The steaks were thick and the griddle got incredibly hot, so the outsides of the steaks were ready when they were still 55 degrees F on the inside. But my oven was hot (cooking some side-dishery), so I put them in there for a couple of minutes to finish them off and they turned out very nicely. But I was lucky. If the oven hadn't been on, it may not have ended as well.

    Because the griddle was so large, there was really no way to create a usable 2-stage fire on the Weber because there just wasn't enough space on either side of griddle for the steaks to cook indirectly. A smaller griddle placed against one side of the kettle (not centered) would have been a much better way to go. And trying this method with cheaper meat would have been wise, too. But in the end, I got lucky and they turned out great (at least according to my guests, who left nothing behind).

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #34 - December 1st, 2017, 8:06 am
    Post #34 - December 1st, 2017, 8:06 am Post #34 - December 1st, 2017, 8:06 am
    i'm a big fan of the reverse sear method, especially for thick (expensive) ribeyes
  • Post #35 - March 6th, 2018, 12:14 pm
    Post #35 - March 6th, 2018, 12:14 pm Post #35 - March 6th, 2018, 12:14 pm
    Has anyone been recently and care to comment? Last year I took my best friend to Bavette's on his birthday for steak and need a new stellar steak experience for this birthday. Neither of us have been to Boeufhaus. Thanks!
  • Post #36 - March 6th, 2018, 2:24 pm
    Post #36 - March 6th, 2018, 2:24 pm Post #36 - March 6th, 2018, 2:24 pm
    My last visit was early 2018...firing on all cylinders
  • Post #37 - March 6th, 2018, 2:54 pm
    Post #37 - March 6th, 2018, 2:54 pm Post #37 - March 6th, 2018, 2:54 pm
    LaurenL wrote:Has anyone been recently and care to comment?

    Ordered pretty much everything on the menu at a group lunch in mid-January and it was all excellent. So, still humming along as always.

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #38 - March 6th, 2018, 10:17 pm
    Post #38 - March 6th, 2018, 10:17 pm Post #38 - March 6th, 2018, 10:17 pm
    Was just there a few weeks ago before an Oh Sees show at the EB. Our meal was solid as always, and had some well executed cocktails. If the tongue dish is still on the menu, you must have it.
  • Post #39 - May 8th, 2018, 12:06 pm
    Post #39 - May 8th, 2018, 12:06 pm Post #39 - May 8th, 2018, 12:06 pm
    I had a hunch that we could just walk in at 8 pm on a recent Wednesday night and I was glad to be right about that. The restaurant was about 2/3 full and we ended up having a excellent and memorable dinner. Highlights were a roasted ramp appetizer (with red and green romesco sauces) and a perfectly cooked 55-day aged Porterhouse for 2. The steak was minerally, funky and rich. A trio of sides - stewed beans, roasted mushrooms and cabbage - were excellent, too.

    As full as we were, we snarfed down an Oatmeal Cookie Bar (apple gastrique, vanilla, cinnamon crunch). We weren't as crazy about the Chocolate Bavarois (caramelized peanut butter, banana, sourdough) but it didn't matter, as we were beyond full.

    With our meal we had a reasonably priced Nebbiolo, chosen by my better half. There was a part of me that wished for a bit more fruit but I have to say that the tannins foiled the richness of the meal well, especially the steak.

    This place is not inexpensive but given the extraordinary quality of the fare, it is absolutely worth the splurge . . . and so darned easy to access on a weeknight!

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #40 - May 8th, 2018, 1:52 pm
    Post #40 - May 8th, 2018, 1:52 pm Post #40 - May 8th, 2018, 1:52 pm
    My wife and I split the same porterhouse special on Tuesday and I agree, it was excellent. The real highlight of the meal, though, was the chick pea cavatelli. I could eat a bucket of that.
  • Post #41 - September 8th, 2018, 10:38 am
    Post #41 - September 8th, 2018, 10:38 am Post #41 - September 8th, 2018, 10:38 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I bought some 55-day aged ribeyes at the butcher counter there last week and they were spectacular. Costly, yes but a true value given the quality.

    =R=

    That Boeufhaus has a butcher counter in front goes unnoticed by many, but when I'm craving an incredible dry aged steak, that's where I head. And since they're open for lunch most days, I can head there before the big dinner crowds descend upon the place (and enjoy a great lunch in the process). But of all the dry aged beef I've purchased/eaten in Chicago, I have not had better than at Boeufhaus.

    Here's some dry aged ribeye from last weekend, bagged with salt, pepper, shallots, thyme and rosemary, cooked sous vide at 131 degrees for a few hours, dried off, more salt and pepper, seared in a blazing hot pan including to crisp up the exterior fat, and then brushed with unsalted butter. I'm not sure I've ever had a better steak.

    Image

    Image

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    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #42 - September 8th, 2018, 1:18 pm
    Post #42 - September 8th, 2018, 1:18 pm Post #42 - September 8th, 2018, 1:18 pm
    Congratulations, that is a fantastic looking steak. I've been getting similar, though not quite as good results on the ceramic cooker, using low temp to 120, then raising the coals to as hot as possible and putting the steak back on for the char. Sous vide is, I think, a superior process, mostly for the control. What type of sous vide do you use? Oh, and to be sure we stay on topic, Boefhaus is an excellent source for steaks, but don't tell anyone about that.
    "Living well is the best revenge"
  • Post #43 - September 10th, 2018, 7:42 am
    Post #43 - September 10th, 2018, 7:42 am Post #43 - September 10th, 2018, 7:42 am
    Pursuit wrote:Congratulations, that is a fantastic looking steak. I've been getting similar, though not quite as good results on the ceramic cooker, using low temp to 120, then raising the coals to as hot as possible and putting the steak back on for the char. Sous vide is, I think, a superior process, mostly for the control. What type of sous vide do you use? Oh, and to be sure we stay on topic, Boefhaus is an excellent source for steaks, but don't tell anyone about that.

    Thanks! Sous Vide Supreme and I love it. For larger cuts, reverse sear all the way, but sous vide always delivers perfect results . . . even better with short rib done 48-72 hours.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #44 - September 10th, 2018, 9:36 am
    Post #44 - September 10th, 2018, 9:36 am Post #44 - September 10th, 2018, 9:36 am
    BR wrote:
    Pursuit wrote:Congratulations, that is a fantastic looking steak. I've been getting similar, though not quite as good results on the ceramic cooker, using low temp to 120, then raising the coals to as hot as possible and putting the steak back on for the char. Sous vide is, I think, a superior process, mostly for the control. What type of sous vide do you use? Oh, and to be sure we stay on topic, Boefhaus is an excellent source for steaks, but don't tell anyone about that.

    Thanks! Sous Vide Supreme and I love it. For larger cuts, reverse sear all the way, but sous vide always delivers perfect results . . . even better with short rib done 48-72 hours.


    What's your searing technique after the Sous Vide. I've had one for a few months now and I love using it, but still haven't gotten the sear down quite yet.
  • Post #45 - September 10th, 2018, 10:25 am
    Post #45 - September 10th, 2018, 10:25 am Post #45 - September 10th, 2018, 10:25 am
    JoeChicago wrote:
    BR wrote:
    Pursuit wrote:Congratulations, that is a fantastic looking steak. I've been getting similar, though not quite as good results on the ceramic cooker, using low temp to 120, then raising the coals to as hot as possible and putting the steak back on for the char. Sous vide is, I think, a superior process, mostly for the control. What type of sous vide do you use? Oh, and to be sure we stay on topic, Boefhaus is an excellent source for steaks, but don't tell anyone about that.

    Thanks! Sous Vide Supreme and I love it. For larger cuts, reverse sear all the way, but sous vide always delivers perfect results . . . even better with short rib done 48-72 hours.


    What's your searing technique after the Sous Vide. I've had one for a few months now and I love using it, but still haven't gotten the sear down quite yet.

    Remove steak from the bag, dry steak off thoroughly with paper towels, apply salt and pepper liberally, heat a little oil (enough to hit the whole surface of the steak - choose one with a high smoke point) in pan on highest heat until it just begins to smoke, sear on both sides for 30 seconds to a minute, sear edges too . . . fatty edges longer to crisp up some. I then brush the steak with a little melted butter.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #46 - September 10th, 2018, 6:34 pm
    Post #46 - September 10th, 2018, 6:34 pm Post #46 - September 10th, 2018, 6:34 pm
    I presume you use a cast iron pan.
  • Post #47 - September 10th, 2018, 7:32 pm
    Post #47 - September 10th, 2018, 7:32 pm Post #47 - September 10th, 2018, 7:32 pm
    scottsol wrote:I presume you use a cast iron pan.

    I did - it's my preferred choice, though I don't think it's absolutely critical.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago

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